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Toronto ComiCon 2016: Where the surreal and real collide

Spiderman in line for the washroom. Kylo Ren, menacing a meeting room. It’s a different kind of world inside Toronto ComiCon.


 

It is, for the thousands of fanatics who go every year, church: Toronto ComiCon, a three-day festival of geek culture, workshops, and celebrity appearances, becomes a kind of cathedral for a weekend Mass. And just as church has its rituals, so too do these ComiCons—specifically, in the attendees’ elaborate costumes, the painstakingly crafted monuments to their favourite characters. As the convention winds down, here’s a look at some of the fans who put on their Sunday best.


 

Toronto ComiCon 2016: Where the surreal and real collide

  1. Candids of cosplayers looking their worst. Not a great representation of the photographer’s profession. These people spend thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours getting their cosplay ready for show, only to have some hack take pictures while they’re waiting in line at the ATM. For shame, Maclean’s. Show a little respect.

  2. This is so disrespectful. As a photographer, your job is to make sure that everyone looks good and comfortable. It is highly disrespectful to take photo’s of cosplayer’s without their permission. None of these look like you asked permission at all. People take thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours to create these masterpieces of cosplay’s and you decided to not do your research when it comes to convention protocol and rules. Everyone has to make sure everyone is comfortable and happy and ready for a photo, it is such a shame… ask. That is all you have to do.

  3. This article is brutal!! I would certainly say ComiCon is a special experience, but I have never heard anyone relate it to attending Mass. The sentence structure here makes no sense.
    “It is, for the thousands of fanatics who go every year, church: Toronto ComiCon, a three-day festival of geek culture, workshops, and celebrity appearances, becomes a kind of cathedral for a weekend Mass. And just as church has its rituals, so too do these ComiCons—specifically, in the attendees’ elaborate costumes, the painstakingly crafted monuments to their favourite characters.” Improper use of a colon, starting a sentence with AND, and just the worst analogies I have ever heard. How is wearing a costume a “ritual”?

    It is a shame that such a reputable magazine/site let someone who has never attended a Con post such a poorly written article.

    Maclean’s clearly has no idea what ComiCon or etiquette is. The first rule of photography is that you ask first. 99% of these pictures are taken from the side as cosplayers go about their days, or pose for a totally separate camera.

    You guys should be ashamed of this coverage and article.

  4. It’s obvious from the comments that cosplayers misunderstand the purpose of news photography (and I’m both a cosplayer and a photojournalist). News photographers are looking for the unusual, the incongruous and the unique – all of which these photos exhibit. As long as a journalist is credentialed by the Con, those attending are fair game. It’s not, as one poster says, the news photographer’s “job to make sure that everyone looks good and comfortable.”

    Secondly, I agree with the comments regarding the intro blurb, which probably weren’t written by the photographer, but an editor. It does display a bias against cosplayers and Cons in general, seeing them as a “festival of geek culture.” I’d love to see Maclean’s exhibit the same attitude towards football or baseball fans and see what kind of backlash there would be.

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