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Maclean’s on the Hill: Liberals propose an assisted-dying law

The Maclean’s Ottawa bureau gives a weekly audio debrief on Canadian politics.


 

podcast

Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. This week, the Liberal government unveiled long-awaited assisted dying legislation—and critics have come out in full force. The government took a cautious approach by proposing more restrictions than some were expecting, and that’s leading to speculation about future legal challenges. We speak with the CEO of Dying with Dignity, as well as author Sandra Martin.

NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair was turfed by his own party in a leadership review vote, but he’ll stay on as leader until his replacement is chosen. The Maclean’s panel discusses Mulcair’s collapse, the state of the NDP and the party’s upcoming search for a new leader.

With states of emergency being declared in First Nations communities, should the government help Indigenous people in Canada move away from these areas if they want to? Former prime minister Jean Chrétien is taking a lot of criticism for that very suggestion, but Maclean’s columnist Scott Gilmore has been pushing for a similar approach for some time. It’s a controversial topic, and Gilmore joins us to make his case.

Finally, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised the recent election would be the last one using our current electoral system, and politics watchers should soon find out how the government plans to study changes to the way Canada votes. We speak with a pollster and a professor about the options.

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The full episode


Part 1. Ottawa reacts to an assisted-dying bill.

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Part 2. The NDP moves on from Tom Mulcair.

NDP leader Tom Mulcair speaks to reporters about the federal budget on Parliament Hill, Tuesday, March 22, 2016 in Ottawa. (Justin Tang/CP)

Tom Mulcair speaks to reporters about the federal budget on Parliament Hill on March 22, 2016 in Ottawa. (Justin Tang, CP)


Part 3. How should Canada help residents of Attawapiskat?

The remains of a Canadian flag can be seen flying over a building in Attawapiskat, Ont. on November 29, 2011. The federal government is forcing the troubled Attawapiskat First Nation to pay a private-sector consultant about $1,300 a day to run its finances - even though the government's own assessments say the third-party management system is not cost-effective. (Adrian Wyld/CP)

The remains of a Canadian flag can be seen flying over a building in Attawapiskat, Ont. on November 29, 2011.  (Adrian Wyld, CP)


Part 4. When will Canada see Trudeau’s pitch for electoral reform?

Canada's new Democratic Institutions Minister Maryam Monsef is sworn-in during a ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa November 4, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Wattie - RTX1URRR

Canada’s new Democratic Institutions Minister Maryam Monsef on November 4, 2015. (Chris Wattie, Reuters)


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