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Maclean’s on the Hill, Nov. 11: What Trump means for Canada

It’s the big question on everyone’s mind. So this week’s politics podcast tries to figure out Donald Trump’s rise—and how it’ll affect Canadians.


 

podcast

Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. This week: Canadians grapple with the meaning and the aftermath of the U.S. election that made Donald Trump a president-elect.

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The full episode


Part 1. How Donald Trump became president-elect

U.S. President elect Donald Trump arrives to address supporters with his son Barron and wife MelaniaRepublican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. (Brendan McDermid/Reuters)

U.S. President elect Donald Trump arrives to address supporters with his son Barron and wife MelaniaRepublican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. (Brendan McDermid/Reuters)

Well, it happened. Despite the polling and the punditry, Donald Trump trounced the Democrats’ Hillary Clinton to win the U.S. election; he will be inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States in January. It’s all anyone interested in politics can talk about—how did this happen? Jonathon Gatehouse, who wrote a ten-chapter longread tracking his ascendance, has some answers.


Part 2. Tom Mulcair calls for Trudeau to talk tough to Trump

NDP leader Tom Mulcair speaks to reporters about the federal budget on Parliament Hill, Tuesday, March 22, 2016 in Ottawa. (Justin Tang/CP)

NDP leader Tom Mulcair speaks to reporters about the federal budget on Parliament Hill, Tuesday, March 22, 2016 in Ottawa. (Justin Tang/CP)

For Justin Trudeau, the election of Donald Trump poses huge tactical issues, on NAFTA, climate change, and more. But Trudeau has so far remained positive about the relationship between his office and a Trump White House. NDP interim leader Tom Mulcair, however, thinks left-learning voters want to hear more than mere statecraft.


Part 3. Could Trump-style politics come to Canada?

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During the U.S. election, Canada’s immigration website went down—a light-hearted reflection of Americans considering fleeing the country in the wake of Trump’s election victory. But Canadians shouldn’t get too smug; Trump’s victory has been welcomed by at least one politician who is hoping to become the leader of the opposition Conservative Party: Kellie Leitch, who pitched a values test for incoming Canadians. Former Conservative cabinet minister James Moore explains why he thinks Trump-style populism won’t take root in his party or his country.


Part 4. Kent Hehr on the veterans’ file

Veteran Affairs Minister Kent Hehr, left, chats with veterans as Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, centre, looks on, as they attend a spaghetti dinner at a local community centre in St. Andrews, N.B., on Monday, Jan. 18, 2016. The federal Liberal cabinet is meeting in the seaside town, working on their plans for the year, including their upcoming budget. (Andrew Vaughan/CP)

Veteran Affairs Minister Kent Hehr, left, chats with veterans as Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, centre, looks on, as they attend a spaghetti dinner at a local community centre in St. Andrews, N.B., on Monday, Jan. 18, 2016. The federal Liberal cabinet is meeting in the seaside town, working on their plans for the year, including their upcoming budget. (Andrew Vaughan/CP)

To mark Remembrance Day, Kent Hehr—the minister of veterans’ affairs—spoke to Cormac about progress and problems in his department, and what comes next.


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Maclean’s on the Hill, Nov. 11: What Trump means for Canada

  1. Kelly Leitch does not speak for very man Conservatives – at least not this one. All parties have some questionable candidates at the fringe and she looks like one of them. Trump should have been at the fringe with her.

  2. The forces that elected Trump are well and alive in Canada. Trump was essentially elected by angry people who lost their jobs in the rust belt due to American companies shipping their labour offshore to low wage countries with poor environmental and labour standards.

    Ontario’s manufacturing industry is being battered by these same forces. Trudeau’s worrisome tendency to prioritize UN popularity over Canadian jobs will not help matters. One cannot deny that there is little holding the Ontario economy together beyond frightening levels of debt and transfer payments from provinces such as Saskatchewan and Newfoundland. That can’t last.

  3. Macleans is guilty of the same variety of paranoid vilifications that are causing psychologists to be working with Hispanic infants in America. Even at the height of the Cold War with monthly ‘duck and cover exercises’ and the US Navy fending-off Soviet Nukes on the way to Cuba, nobody thought it was smart to be terrorizing children with ‘bugaboos’ over which they had no control.

    We’ve raised up a couple of generations if idiot children since then, the same kind who encourage their kids to thing there’s nothing abnormal about two men pleasuring each other in public but dreaming of ‘bad politicians coming to get them’ at night. A pox on their house. And Macleans wants to import the infection?

    We won’t know what Trump holds for Canada before he takes office. Hopefully by then our ‘media’ won’t have given him a lot of negative assholicity to discuss with our Prime Minister.

  4. The good thing about the Trump presidency will be his stepping out of the ridiculous Paris Climate change hoax and refusing to apply a carbon tax. This in and of itself will be the final nail in Kathleen Wynne’s coffin. Justin will continue to breast feed the U.N. and pander to communist countries while industries in Canada will be forced to relocate back to the U.S. because they can’t complete with the low U.S. 15% tax. Buh Bye Justin in ’19.

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