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Maclean’s on the Hill: U.S. election, Ottawa’s fiscal troubles

A Canadian politician observes the U.S. election. What Bill Morneau’s fiscal update didn’t say. Get your fix of Canadian politics.


 

podcast

Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. This week, the U.S. election campaign is in its home stretch, and some public opinion polls show Trump and Clinton are neck and neck. We start off our show this week by checking in with Allen Abel, who’s covered much of the action south of the border in Maclean’s. Abel discusses the mood of the American people in these final days before the vote.

Next, we speak with NDP MP Nathan Cullen, who is also south of the border as a part of a Canadian delegation observing the vote. He joins Cormac to discuss the impact of the election on Canada.

Are you getting sick of the sky-high price of flying, or have you ever been bumped from a flight or had your luggage lost? Well, the Trudeau government has announced a new transportation strategy aimed at lowering costs and granting new rights to air travellers. Transport Minister Marc Garneau is here to break it down.

And finally, this week the Trudeau government gave its fall economic update, promising to boost infrastructure spending and post larger deficits. We’re joined by Stephen Tapp, research director at the Institute for Research for Public Policy, who highlights some numbers missed by many observers.

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The full episode



Part 1. The last days of the 2016 campaign

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. (Jim Young/Reuters)

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. (Jim Young/Reuters)

The U.S. election campaign is in its home stretch, and some public opinion polls show Trump and Clinton are neck and neck. We start off our show this week by checking in with Allen Abel, who’s covered much of the action south of the border in Maclean’s. Abel discusses the mood of the American people in these final days before the vote.



Part 2. Canadians observe American voters

Nathan Cullen during the 2016 NDP Federal Convention in Edmonton Alberta, April 8, 2016. (Jenna Marie Wakani/NDP)

Nathan Cullen during the 2016 NDP Federal Convention in Edmonton Alberta, April 8, 2016. (Jenna Marie Wakani/NDP)

We speak with NDP MP Nathan Cullen, who is also south of the border as a part of a Canadian delegation observing the vote. He joins Cormac to discuss the impact of the election on Canada.



Part 3. Liberals beef up passenger rights

Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Are you getting sick of the sky-high price of flying, or have you ever been bumped from a flight or had your luggage lost? Well, the Trudeau government has announced a new transportation strategy aimed at lowering costs and granting new rights to air travellers. Transport Minister Marc Garneau is here to break it down.



Part 4. What Bill Morneau didn’t say

Minister of Finance Bill Morneau speaks during a press conference before tabling the Fall Economic Statement, on Parliament Hill, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Minister of Finance Bill Morneau speaks during a press conference before tabling the Fall Economic Statement, on Parliament Hill, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

This week, the Trudeau government gave its fall economic update, promising to boost infrastructure spending and post larger deficits. We’re joined by Stephen Tapp, research director at the Institute for Research for Public Policy, who highlights some numbers missed by many observers.


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