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Maclean’s on the Hill: Will the feds give cities housing money?

Our #cdnpoli podcast is your debrief on the week that was on Parliament Hill


 

podcast

Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. After 19 years in federal politics, longtime Conservative MP Jason Kenney has taken off for provincial pastures. On his way out, he took a big parting shot at a former cabinet colleague Kellie Leitch. Kenney kicks off our show this week in an exit interview.

How did a person of interest in a terrorism investigation get so close to the Prime Minister that he was able to wrap his arm around Justin Trudeau—and take a picture with him? A former RCMP Deputy Commissioner weighs in.

The fall session of Parliament has brought no shortage of federal funding requests. On top of the provinces demanding more money for a new health accord, and more freedom for a climate change strategy, Canada’s big cities want a massive cash injection for social housing. Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson discusses the housing crunch for municipalities.

And: You’ve been trumped! We speak with a documentary film maker about his new project, which is a doc about Donald Trump’s battle with a Scottish farmer, which is taken right to the presidential campaign

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The full episode



Part 1. Jason Kenney opposes a ‘values test’

Conservative MP Jason Kenney in Edmonton, Alberta on Thursday, July 7, 2016.  (Photograph by Amber Bracken)

Conservative MP Jason Kenney in Edmonton, Alberta on Thursday, July 7, 2016. (Photograph by Amber Bracken)

After 19 years in federal politics, longtime Conservative MP Jason Kenney has taken off for provincial pastures. On his way out, he took a big parting shot at a former cabinet colleague Kellie Leitch. Kenney kicks off our show this week in an exit interview.



Part 2. The perils of the selfie era

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau makes an announcement during an event in Bridgetown, N.S. on Tuesday, August 16, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

How did a person of interest in a terrorism investigation get so close to the Prime Minister that he was able to wrap his arm around Justin Trudeau—and take a picture with him? A former RCMP Deputy Commissioner weighs in.



Part 3. Cities face a housing crunch

Photograph by Andrew Tolson

Don Iveson. Photograph by Andrew Tolson

The fall session of Parliament has brought no shortage of federal funding requests. On top of the provinces demanding more money for a new health accord, and more freedom for a climate change strategy, Canada’s big cities want a massive cash injection for social housing. Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson discusses the housing crunch for municipalities.



Part 4. You’ve been Trumped!

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a rally with supporters in Council Bluffs, Iowa, U.S. September 28, 2016. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a rally with supporters in Council Bluffs, Iowa, U.S. September 28, 2016. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

You’ve been trumped! We speak with a documentary film maker about his new project, which is a doc about Donald Trump’s battle with a Scottish farmer, which is taken right to the presidential campaign

Download this podcast.

 

Maclean’s on the Hill: Will the feds give cities housing money?

  1. The cities want more money … of course they do: it provides them with a revenue stream that insulates them from taxpayer complaint. The pitch is that this is an investment yet cities rarely do anything without major cost over-run and 2/3 of what they want is merely to remedy insufficient maintenance and make up for operational deficiencies. Most of the larger cities have espoused densification which shifts the residential unit base to higher value housing units replacing existing low end housing units, with the obvious result of increasing housing costs by depleting the low end supply and increasing the median price of new units (Vancouver is the poster boy for this having been an early adopter of densification); this is exacerbated by the use of reduced development charges to incentivize densification. In short, they are largely a) the cause of the problem and b) have no intention of taking any responsibility; the interviewee’s attempts to blame the problem on poor people is disgusting but symptomatic. The best they (city politicians) can come up with is looking for an Ottawa bailout (shamelessly hoping that there incompetence and mismanagement isn’t too obvious).

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