Terror in Manchester, Tory leadership: Maclean's on the Hill - Macleans.ca
 

Terror in Manchester, Tory leadership: Maclean’s on the Hill

Also on our weekly politics podcast: No way was that a photobomb, Prime Minister!


 

podcast

Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. This week, terror in Manchester. Nearly two dozen people in the U.K. were killed this week after a bomb exploded at an Ariana Grande concert. It was a horrendous attack, but should Canada be concerned as we prepare to celebrate Canada150 with large public gatherings around the country? We speak with Stephanie Carvin, a former government security analyst.

The government has launched its competition to eventually award nearly $1 billion to so-called innovation superclusters. University of Toronto professor David Wolfe explains the supercluster concept, as well as the economic impact they could have.

This weekend, federal Conservatives choose a new path forward with a new leader. The leadership race has been a soul-searching moment for the Tories as they prepare for the challenges the party faces ahead of the 2019 election. Here to look back at the campaign, and tell us what it has meant for his party, is Conservative strategist Jason Lietaer.

And finally, the Prime Minister made another social media splash this week thanks to a picture of him running behind a group of high-school students who seemed oblivious to who he was. But Maclean’s associate editor Aaron Hutchins has written a piece arguing no on should be calling it a photobomb. He explains why he’s upset with the faux photobomb.

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The full episode



Part 1. What’s the terror threat as we celebrate Canada150?

A girl leaves flowers for the victims of an attack on concert goers at Manchester Arena, in central Manchester, Britain May 23, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls - RTX379QY

A girl leaves flowers for the victims of an attack on concert goers at Manchester Arena, in central Manchester, Britain, on May 23, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls – RTX379QY

Nearly two dozen people in the U.K. were killed this week after a bomb exploded at an Ariana Grande concert. It was a horrendous attack. Should Canada be concerned as we prepare to celebrate Canada150 with large public gatherings around the country? We speak with Stephanie Carvin, a former government security analyst.



Part 2. What are innovation superclusters?

Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Navdeep Bains speaks during a news conference, Tuesday, June 14, 2016 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/CP)

Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Navdeep Bains speaks during a news conference, Tuesday, June 14, 2016 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/CP)

The government has launched its competition to eventually award nearly $1 billion to so-called innovation superclusters. University of Toronto professor David Wolfe explains the supercluster concept, as well as the economic impact they could have.



Part 3. Reflecting on the Tory leadership campaign

Maxime Bernier, Member of Parliament (MP) and Conservative Party leader candidate, speaks during the final Conservative Party of Canada leadership debate in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on Wednesday, April 26, 2017. The Canadian Conservative party leadership front-runner, celebrity investor and reality-TV star Kevin O'Leary, withdrew from the 14-way race and threw his support behind rival Maxime Bernier in an effort to beat Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in 2019. (Cole Burston/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

(Cole Burston/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

This weekend, federal Conservatives choose a new path forward with a new leader. The leadership race has been a soul-searching moment for the Tories as they prepare for the challenges the party faces ahead of the 2019 election. Here to look back at the campaign, and tell us what it has meant for his party, is Conservative strategist Jason Lietaer.



Part 4. No way was that a photobomb, Prime Minister.

(Photograph by Adam Scotti)

(Photograph by Adam Scotti)

The Prime Minister made another social media splash this week thanks to a picture of him running behind a group of high-school students who seemed oblivious to who he was. But Maclean’s associate editor Aaron Hutchins has written a piece arguing no on should be calling it a photobomb. He explains why he’s upset with the faux photobomb.

Download this podcast.


 

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