0

Amid crisis, Greece orders islands to slow migrant traffic

Thousands of people are stranded on the mainland in increasingly desperate conditions


 
Lifejackets are seen abandoned by Syrian refugees on a beach after they crossed the Aegean Sea in a dinghy from Turkey to the Greek island of Kos, August 8, 2015. Some 124,000 refugees and migrants had arrived in Greece by sea at the end of July this year, a staggering 750 percent increase on the same period in 2014, the United Nations (U.N.) refugee agency detailed on Friday. (Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)

Lifejackets are seen abandoned by Syrian refugees on a beach after they crossed the Aegean Sea in a dinghy from Turkey to the Greek island of Kos, August 8, 2015. Some 124,000 refugees and migrants had arrived in Greece by sea at the end of July this year, a staggering 750 percent increase on the same period in 2014, the United Nations (U.N.) refugee agency detailed on Friday. (Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)

ATHENS, Greece – Greece’s government on Friday ordered authorities on islands near Turkey to reduce the number of migrants allowed to travel by ferry to the mainland, where thousands of people are stranded in increasingly desperate conditions following border closures in the countries to the north.

Ferry companies and regional authorities were handed the instructions as the number of people stranded in Greece continues to rise, with thousands sleeping rough in parks and along the country’s highways, and existing shelters filled to capacity.

In Athens, migrants staged peaceful protests, briefly blocking traffic at the country’s main port, while hundreds walked out of a transit camp and were heading on foot to the city centre.

Merchant Marine Minister Theodoros Dritsas said up to two thirds of migrants arriving on Lesbos and other Greek islands would be held there until Sunday.

“The reason is that we need more time to prepare additional sites for temporary shelters,” Dritsas said.

He said chartered ferries would be used on islands to provide temporary shelter over the next three days.

About 2,000 people – more than half from Syria and Iraq – are arriving daily from Turkey using dinghies and small boats, but the number of people crossing into neighbouring Macedonia has dropped dramatically in the past week, and was down to just 150 on Thursday, according to Greek police figures.

Athens is blaming Austria for the flare-up in the crisis after it imposed strict transit restrictions last week, controls that were also implemented by Balkan countries further back on the route.

Greece recalled its ambassador to Austria Thursday and rejected a request to visit Athens by Austrian Interior Minister Johanna Mikl-Leitner, government officials said.

Athens says it is unable to stop migrants crossing its sea borders without endangering their lives.

“The policies of Austria and Hungary are turning Greece into a giant refugee camp,” deputy Education Minister Sia Anagnostoipoulou told state-run NET television.

“What are we supposed to do: Let people drown in the Aegean Sea?” she said. “Instead of making a plan. Europe is burying its head in the sand … Europe is unraveling.”


 
Filed under:

Sign in to comment.