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11 stories in Canada we’re watching

The latest from Fort McMurray, Western Premiers Conference begins — minus Notley


 
A helicopter battles a wildfire in Fort McMurray, Alta., on Wednesday May 4, 2016. The wildfire has already torched 1,600 structures in the evacuated oil hub of Fort McMurray and is poised to renew its attack in another day of scorching heat and strong winds. (Jason franson/CP)

A helicopter battles a wildfire in Fort McMurray, Alta., on Wednesday May 4, 2016.  (Jason Franson, CP)

Eleven stories in the news today:

ALBERTA EVACUEES FACE SECOND EVACUTION

Exhausted residents of Fort McMurray, Alta., boarded buses with weary resignation Wednesday night when they were told they had to be evacuated yet again, this time from their emergency accommodations in nearby Anzac. The Rural Municipality of Wood Buffalo said changing weather patterns required people to leave Anzac, Gregoire Lake Estates and Fort McMurray First Nation to be bused to Edmonton.

EVACUATION ORDER LIFTED AT SECOND ALBERTA FIRE

An evacuation order in another part of Alberta has been cancelled. A blaze west of Edmonton caused an evacuation of houses and schools on the Alexis reserve as well as in the hamlet of Glenevis. But late Wednesday night, the order for the entirety of the County of Lac Ste. Anne was lifted and residents were told they could return home.

OWNERS FEAR FOR ABANDONED PETS

Laura Gislason and her boyfriend Kyle Benio escaped the Fort McMurray wildfires with just the clothes on their backs. Now safe with relatives in Edmonton, her thoughts centre on the dog and cat they were forced to leave behind: a 16-year-old bichon-Shih Tzu named Gabi and Pastel, a five-year-old calico.

FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION MONEY SET TO FLOW

Canada’s infrastructure minister says he expects Ottawa and most of the provinces to sign agreements in the next month to allow new infrastructure money to flow to cities. The funding agreements are a key milestone in the government’s new infrastructure program because the billions promised to municipalities can’t reach them without provinces signing on the dotted line.

REPORT SAYS MEDDLING IN WIRELESS MARKET FAILED

A report being released today says Canadian consumers were on the losing end of a gamble by the former Conservative government to create more competition in the wireless market. And the study by researchers at the Montreal Economic Institute says the country’s telecom regulator can learn from that failed policy by backing away from calls to interfere in the broadband Internet marketplace.

FOUR-MEMBER PANEL TO REVIEW CANADA POST

The federal government embarks today on a formal review of Canada Post that will look at whether the Crown corporation should continue with its plan to cut door-to-door mail delivery. The four-member independent panel could also examine whether the national letter carrier should get back into the banking business.

ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:

The two-day Western Premiers Conference begins in Vancouver.

Treasury Board President Scott Brison appears before a Commons committee to discuss the Access to Information Act.

The Commons justice and human rights committee will hear witnesses on Bill C-14, medical assistance in dying.

The Parliamentary Budget Officer will post a report titled “Federal Spending on Postsecondary Education.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will speak at the National Holocaust Remembrance Day Ceremony in Ottawa.


 
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