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12 stories in Canada we’re watching

In the news today: Peter Mansbridge announces retirement, Hudson’s Bay to release results, PM Trudeau honours war dead


 

PETER MANSBRIDGE TO RETIRE NEXT SUMMER

After almost 30 years as anchor of CBC’s flagship news program, Peter Mansbridge will leave the The National next summer. He told viewers during Monday night’s broadcast that he will step down after anchoring the network’s Canada Day coverage next July 1, when the country will mark its 150th birthday. Mansbridge’s career has spanned nearly five decades, including 28 years at the helm of The National as anchor and chief correspondent.

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PM TRUDEAU HONOURS WAR DEAD IN HONG KONG

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau paid homage Tuesday to Canadian soldiers who died after fighting to defend Hong Kong during the Second World War. On the final day of his week-long visit to China, Trudeau toured the mountainside Sai Wan War Cemetery. He also laid a wreath at a memorial engraved with the names of Canadian soldiers and walked past rows of Canadian graves decorated with a single poppy and the Maple Leaf.

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CANADIANS URGED TO AVOID WESTERN MEXICO AS HURRICANE NEARS

Canadians are being advised to stay away from western Mexico as hurricane Newton approaches. Global Affairs Canada says Canadians should avoid all non-essential travel to the coastline between Cabo San Lazaro and Loreto. By early this morning, Newton was about 200 kilometres southeast of Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo with maximum sustained winds of 150 km/h.

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ALBERTA JUDGE ON HOT SEAT

The Canadian Judicial Council will decide whether an Alberta judge should keep his job after asking a sexual assault complainant why she couldn’t keep her knees together. Justice Robin Camp made the comment in 2014 while a provincial court judge in Calgary and acquitted the man accused of assaulting the woman. Camp, who was later appointed to the Federal Court, has indicated he wants to remain on the bench and will issue an apology.

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MUNICIPALITIES WANT FEDERAL DOLLARS DOLED OUT DIFFERENTLY

Municipalities are pressing the federal government to change how it decides how much money cities should get for transit and water projects. Municipal leaders want more money to go to small centres to help them build a transit system or improve private septic systems. The details are in reports prepared for Infrastructure Minister Amarjeet Sohi after he met in June with members of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.

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APPEAL OF TRUCKER’S ACQUITTAL IN ABORIGINAL WOMAN’S DEATH

Alberta prosecutors are set to begin appeal arguments today in the acquittal of an Ontario trucker charged with killing an aboriginal woman. A jury last year found Bradley Barton not guilty of first-degree murder in the death of Cindy Gladue, a 36-year-old prostitute who was found dead in a bathtub in an Edmonton motel room in 2011. The verdict sparked protests in several cities and calls for justice for aboriginal women across the country.

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NORMAN KWONG TO RECEIVE PUBLIC STATE MEMORIAL

The Alberta government says there will be a public state memorial on Sept. 13 for former lieutenant governor and CFL pioneer Norman Kwong, who died Saturday at the age of 86. Kwong, who played for both Calgary and Edmonton was the first Chinese-Canadian to play in the CFL, and served as Alberta’s lieutenant governor from 2005 until 2010.

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ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:

Robert Wood, the last engineer to inspect the Elliot Lake, Ont., mall before it collapsed, will face trial starting today.

Two Bathurst, N.B. police officers charged in the shooting death of a businessman appear in court for a preliminary hearing.

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil leads a delegation on an 11-day trade mission with visits to several Asian cities.

Hudson’s Bay Company will release its second-quarter results.

Conservative leadership candidate Maxime Bernier will make an announcement in Ottawa about maple syrup exports.


 
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