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Deaths of Quebecers strengthen resolve in terrorism fight: Couillard

Premier Philippe Couillard paid tribute to seven Quebecers who died in terrorist attacks abroad last week


 
A police armored vehicle is parked outside a Starbucks cafe after an explosion in Jakarta, Indonesia Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016. Attackers set off explosions at a Starbucks cafe in a bustling shopping area in Indonesia's capital and waged gunbattles with police Thursday, leaving bodies in the streets as office workers watched in terror from high-rise buildings. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)

A police armored vehicle is parked outside a Starbucks cafe after an explosion in Jakarta, Indonesia Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016. Attackers set off explosions at a Starbucks cafe in a bustling shopping area in Indonesia’s capital and waged gunbattles with police Thursday, leaving bodies in the streets as office workers watched in terror from high-rise buildings. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)

QUEBEC – Nothing can explain barbaric attacks on people who were simply working to build a better world, Premier Philippe Couillard said Monday, referring to the seven Quebecers killed in recent terror attacks.

A Montreal-area man died Thursday in Jakarta while six people from the Quebec City area were slain during a siege in Ouagadougou late Friday.

The premier said the fight against terrorists must continue, all without compromising core values of freedom, democracy and tolerance.

“These actions also strengthen our resolve to fight these barbarians with all our strength, alongside our allies,” Couillard said, adding the attacks were a stark reminder that violence that seemed so distant in the past can touch people at home.

“We live in a troubled world,” he said. “Smaller too. Everything is now so close to us.”

Flags were lowered to half-mast at the provincial legislature in honour of the seven.

Tahar Amer-Ouali, 70, a father of five and a hearing-aid specialist, was killed in Jakarta in an attack by militants tied to the Islamic State group, while six Quebecers on a humanitarian mission were killed in Burkina Faso’s capital during a terrorist attack carried out by al-Qaida.

Four of the dead were from the same family: Yves Carrier, his wife Gladys Chamberland, their adult son Charlelie Carrier and Yves’ adult daughter, Maude Carrier.

The others who died were their friends, Louis Chabot and Suzanne Bernier.

They were among at least 28 people killed when terrorists stormed a hotel and cafe in the African country’s capital of Ouagadougou.

Couillard said there’s a feeling of helplessness in the face of such heinous, gratuitous acts.

“Nothing can explain that one attacks the people who contribute by dedicating themselves to building a better world,” Couillard said.

“This attack against them is also an attack on us all.”

Four of the six killed in Burkina Faso were previous or current employees of a Quebec City school board, where friends and colleagues of the victims were struggling to deal with their deaths.

Classes were cancelled Monday for students at Jean-de-Brebeuf and Cardinal Roy high schools, both part of the Commission scolaire de la Capitale school board in Quebec City.

Erick Parent, the board’s secretary-general, told a news conference that support was being offered to friends and colleagues of the victims.

While there were no classes, doors remained open to students. A dozen psychologists were also on hand to help staff deal with their grief and prepare to respond to students in the coming days.

“It’s a tragedy,” he said. “What we must do is support our employees, and also our students, who are affected by the hundreds through the teachers they’ve frequented in recent years.”

He said the board’s 5,000 employees and 28,000 students will hold a minute of silence on Tuesday before classes begin.

“I think things will have to be handled delicately,” Parent said of the discussions to follow.

Yves Carrier was an assistant principal before his retirement and Bernier had been an administrator at two elementary schools before she retired.

Chamberland, a civil servant, worked for Quebec’s Natural Resources Department, while Charlelie was a student.

Maude Carrier and Chabot were secondary school teachers as of Friday.

A mother of two, Maude Carrier had a twin sister and husband who both worked as teachers at the same board.


 

Deaths of Quebecers strengthen resolve in terrorism fight: Couillard

  1. Quebecers should have considered this possiblity during the last election.

    conservatives under harper: Faced reality, and said up front that Islamic extremism was a real threat to Canadians’ and enacted laws to allow for the removal of extrmists, and the ability of Government to strip Canadian citizenship.

    Liberals under Trudeau: spent more time visiting mosques, and taking selfies with women in Hijab’s (to prove his bona fides) than he’s spent condeming or showing concern of the islamic threat posed by many Canadian muslims.

    But hey…at least he’s pretty.

    • You think that a Harper government could have stopped this? How so?

      The ‘problem’ with West Africa developed under his watch.

      • Balderdash…..

        two points:

        1st. The Harper government could not have stopped this. But what Harper would have done would have been quite different than what Justin Trudeau has done. Harper would condemn terrorism; including calling it Islamic terrorism and Jihad; and vowed to fight it even more strenuously (and he would have done it). Trudeau, went to a mosque In peterborough Ontario, took selfies with Muslim women in hijabs, stated Islam is not a problem, but that he was sad these people were killed.

        2nd. The West Africa problem did not develop under anyone’s watch. It developed under ISLAM’s influence. it will not go away until ISLAM also goes away from the region. Recently, I heard that Nigeria has found a possible solution to the scourage, but the usual suspects in the United Nations are concerned about the methodology.

        Too bad. Screw the UN.

  2. One thing all these atrocities seem to have in common is that ‘security’ shows up, after they happen, and, with only a little more destruction, removes the perpetrators. This often leaves the rest of us with no real idea of ‘why’ they did it, but with the notion, as expressed here, that more security may stop ‘them’ before ‘they’ do it again, next time. I think we need to find out what happened this time and, if relevant, last time – with a view to correcting the underlying reason(s) why someone would act so irrationally. And if there are things we could do, besides selling them more weapons and training them, let’s do it. For there is no amount of security on earth that can stop this stuff 100 percent of the time. Removing an ‘ underlying cause’, if there is one, might.

    • Balderdash wrote:

      “One thing all these atrocities seem to have in common is that ‘security’ shows up, after they happen, and, with only a little more destruction, removes the perpetrators”

      Again, a couple of points.

      1st. True, but it is the same for a house on fire. The fire trucks show up AFTER the fire; as showing up before anything is on fire makes no sense.

      2. What these atrocities have in common, is what atrocities in many areas of the world have in common. THE PROBLEM IS ISLAM !!!

      Until people wake up to this, these acts of terror will become even more common; increasing at the same rate as Islam’s influence in any country. Where Islam goes….murder, mayhem, intolerance, and chaos follows.

      We need to be intolerant of this ideology and not allow anyone who follows it into the country.

  3. thank God we oceans keeping the barbarians away from our gates. Any of the Barbaric invaders that manage to get to Canada at least had to pass some beaurocrats along the way. I wonder how that happens?

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/01/20/sex-harassment-death-threats-violence-are-norm-inside-asylum-centres-says-social-worker/

    After reading this, just remember, these are the folks they let IN to the country, not the ones they kicked out.

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