Do you live in a smart city?

See how your hometown rates on the learning index—compared to 4,700 other cities and communities in Canada.

Do you live in a smart city?

For the full interactive map, which allows you to compare and contrast your hometown with nearly 5,000 other Canadian cities and communities, click here.

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Do you live in a smart city?

  1. In related news "UNIVERSITIES and PRIVATE RESEARCH OFTEN NEAR CITIES".

    Once you take out non-urban areas most places range from about 70 to 80. How useful is this index if it is really capturing the degree of urbanization?

  2. Just as an observation, would this not give in to the general idea that government should be made up of the urban population not the rural?

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    • A good start would be to more equitably redistribute constituencies – urban ridings are underrepresented in the HOC.

  4. Governments don't come up with their own unique policy solutions, they use ideas produces elsewhere (eg. by policy entrepreneurs). The job of elected governments is making tradeoffs between the values of citizens. Excluding rural Canadians would be counterproductive to the purpose of government. Our elected representatives are not selfless – they are re-election-motivated. Even if every MP was a professor of something, you wouldn't get higher quality government. Re-election-minded politicians would continue to fling the same crap, because it is the crap that their constituents want them to fling.

    I mean consider that probably Canada's best PM in recent years was a small-town lawyer of a decidedly un-intellectual bent.

  5. To answer the article's question, I would have to say 'yes.' Go Calgary.

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    • Will yours help you thrive in tough times

  7. And who would that be?

  8. I’m glad horsetohoosier qualified his statement with “…in recent years…” because I think we’d be hard pressed to find any politicians of recent times that qualify among the best overall, LOL.

  9. Jean Chretien

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    • Excellent. You hit the nail right on the head. The results are useless.

  11. Anyone notice that a lot of data, most of it important like high-school dropout rates and post-secondary achievement rates, are only available at the provincial level in a lot of places?

    Looks like the scores are essentially the provincial average with a one or two point variation based on internet availability and distance to schools. This would explain why the scores within provinces seem to populate very well with population density, and why there are such huge differences across provincial borders.

    What’s the point of presenting the data with such high granularity when the source data is so coarse?

  12. Interestingly, there is more variation in scores between rural and urban communities than between provinces. There is almost as much variation between communities of the same type in the same province as there is between the provinces themselves. Although cities in general tend to fare better than rural communities, the highest scores tend to belong to some of the least urbanized cities in Canada.

    Our goal with the CLI is to emulate the inferences that would be made by a reasonable person who had access to the most recent and relevant data. Although there are few data sources with national coverage that will provide statistics for local communities, there are many data sources that describe larger regions (e.g. economic regions, provinces). Rather than act as if we have no data about specific communities, we use the data that describes their surrounding areas and adjust our inferences based on other data that we do have at the local level. This method minimizes the statistical error in the interpretations of the data at all levels. Complete descriptions of the original data can be found at <a href="http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CLI2009/AboutCLI.html#4.” target=”_blank”> <a href="http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CLI2009/AboutCLI.html#4.” target=”_blank”>www.ccl-cca.ca/CLI2009/AboutCLI.html#4.

    Fernando Cartwright
    Canadian Council on Learning

  13. Interestingly, there is more variation in scores between rural and urban communities than between provinces. There is almost as much variation between communities of the same type in the same province as there is between the provinces themselves. Although cities in general tend to fare better than rural communities, the highest scores tend to belong to some of the least urbanized cities in Canada.

    Our goal with the CLI is to emulate the inferences that would be made by a reasonable person who had access to the most recent and relevant data. Although there are few data sources with national coverage that will provide statistics for local communities, there are many data sources that describe larger regions (e.g. economic regions, provinces). Rather than act as if we have no data about specific communities, we use the data that describes their surrounding areas and adjust our inferences based on other data that we do have at the local level. This method minimizes the statistical error in the interpretations of the data at all levels. Complete descriptions of the original data can be found at http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CLI2009/AboutCLI.html#4.

    Fernando Cartwright
    Canadian Council on Learning

    • The problem is that the data is not "relevant", and your "inferences" are not valid. In my community, the only data that refers to us alone is distance to facilities and access to broadband internet. With our "economic region" comprising nearly 1/8 of the entire province of Alberta, the difference in all other data between my small town and the surrounding region, with multiple reserves scattered hither and yon, is vast. Your compiled data, with arguably the most important stats being drawn from province-wide figures, shows me nothing useful.

  14. Interestingly, there is more variation in scores between rural and urban communities than between provinces. There is almost as much variation between communities of the same type in the same province as there is between the provinces themselves. Although cities in general tend to fare better than rural communities, the highest scores tend to belong to some of the least urbanized cities in Canada.

    Our goal with the CLI is to emulate the inferences that would be made by a reasonable person who had access to the most recent and relevant data. Although there are few data sources with national coverage that will provide statistics for local communities, there are many data sources that describe larger regions (e.g. economic regions, provinces). Rather than act as if we have no data about specific communities, we use the data that describes their surrounding areas and adjust our inferences based on other data that we do have at the local level. This method minimizes the statistical error in the interpretations of the data at all levels. Complete descriptions of the original data can be found at <a href="http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CLI2009/AboutCLI.html#4.” target=”_blank”>www.ccl-cca.ca/CLI2009/AboutCLI.html#4.

    Fernando Cartwright
    Canadian Council on Learning

  15. A good start would be to more equitably redistribute constituencies – urban ridings are underrepresented in the HOC.

  16. Interestingly, there are no data for the Yukon, NWT, and Nunavut. As one who lives in the territories, I wonder why MacLean's thought fit to ignore the fact that actual people live in actual communities north of 60.

  17. Interestingly, there are no data for the Yukon, NWT, and Nunavut. As one who lives in the territories, I wonder why MacLean's thought fit to ignore the fact that actual people live in actual communities north of 60.

  18. Excellent. You hit the nail right on the head. The results are useless.

  19. The problem is that the data is not "relevant", and your "inferences" are not valid. In my community, the only data that refers to us alone is distance to facilities and access to broadband internet. With our "economic region" comprising nearly 1/8 of the entire province of Alberta, the difference in all other data between my small town and the surrounding region, with multiple reserves scattered hither and yon, is vast. Your compiled data, with arguably the most important stats being drawn from province-wide figures, shows me nothing useful.

  20. I don't understand how you got your numbers. In the distance to libraries, for instance, no one in our municipaility (Thorold, ON) is more than 20 minutes from a full service library and half that to a branch. The time you have would take us beyond Hamilton and would require us to pass at least 8 full service library brancheson the way.

  21. I don't understand how you got your numbers. In the distance to libraries, for instance, no one in our municipaility (Thorold, ON) is more than 20 minutes from a full service library and half that to a branch. The time you have would take us beyond Hamilton and would require us to pass at least 8 full service library brancheson the way.

  22. Excellent. You hit the nail right on the head. The results are useless.

  23. Excellent. You hit the nail right on the head. The results are useless.

  24. Go Winnipeg! Above Canada average for the high-school dropout rate :)

  25. Go Winnipeg! Above Canada average for the high-school dropout rate :)

  26. Will yours help you thrive in tough times

  27. i'm canceling my subscription , your mag doesn't have moose jaw sk as a city, which it is and has been for years.

  28. i'm canceling my subscription , your mag doesn't have moose jaw sk as a city, which it is and has been for years.

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