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Four stories in Canada we’re watching

In the news today: Jury selection begins for the trial of the man charged with 2012 shooting at PQ election headquarters


 
Parti Québécois Leader Pauline Marois on stage before the shooting. (Paul Chiasson/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Parti Québécois Leader Pauline Marois on stage before the shooting. (Paul Chiasson, CP)

Five stories in the news today:

JURY SELECTION STARTS IN ELECTION NIGHT SHOOTING TRIAL

Jury selection finally begins today for the trial of the man charged in connection with the fatal 2012 shooting at the Parti Quebecois election headquarters. Richard Henry Bain is charged with first degree murder, attempted murder and several weapons related offences. Lighting technician Denis Blanchette was fatally shot outside the PQ headquarters where then-Parti Quebecois leader Pauline Marois was toasting her party’s election win.

NO LAW IN CANADA TO REGULATE MEDICALLY ASSISTED DYING

Canada no longer has a law in place governing medically assisted dying. The Supreme Court gave the government until today to pass a new law to replace the ban on medically assisted dying that it struck down last year. But the Trudeau government’s Bill C-14 is still in the Senate and isn’t expected to be put to a vote there before the end of the week. The top court directed that assisted dying should be available to consenting adults with “grievous and irremediable” medical conditions who are enduring intolerable suffering. The government’s proposed law, however, is more restrictive than what the court set out.

SOCIAL FINANCING DREAMS RUN INTO TURBULENCE

A concept championed by the former Harper government and taken on by the Liberals appears to be struggling. Social financing _ government programs financed through arrangements with the private sector _ was touted as a way for governments to cut costs, put more money into social programming and improve the essential skills of Canadian workers. But government documents suggest the investors who would provide the funding are showing only limited interest and that government red tape is also slowing the process.

COLD CASE UNITS ACROSS CANADA TRY TO CRACK UNSOLVED CRIMES

Toronto police are overhauling their cold case unit by bringing stacks of old documents into the new digital millennium. Squad leader Stacy Gallant says his team of seven detectives has been poring over boxes of unsolved homicide cases as they digitize the documents they contain. The digging led to success last fall when the unit charged a man with first-degree murder in a case dating back 25 years. And Gallant says his team is close to solving about a dozen other cold cases.


 
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