0

Four stories in Canada we’re watching

March 23: Patrick Brazeau has his day in court, shabby conditions at Canadian border posts, and Harper meets NATO


 

Senator Patrick Brazeau leaves Parliament Hill in Ottawa

BRAZEAU GOES ON TRIAL

Suspended senator Patrick Brazeau gets his day in court as he goes on trial today on criminal charges that resulted in his expulsion two years ago from the federal Conservative caucus. Brazeau is charged with assault and sexual assault in connection with an incident in 2013. Few details about the allegations against him have been made public, but he has pleaded not guilty. Prime Minister Harper named Brazeau to the Senate in 2008.

HARPER MEETS TOP NATO OFFICIAL

The Secretary General of NATO is in Ottawa today to meet with Prime Minister Stephen Harper. Sources in government say Harper and Jens Stoltenberg will talk about the situation in Iraq and rising tensions with Russia. The meeting comes the same week that Harper is expected to ask Parliament to expand and extend Canada’s combat mission to combat the Islamic State.

CANADIAN BORDER AGENTS AT REMOTE CROSSINGS DON’T LIVE IN LAP OF LUXURY: REPORT

A federal evaluation says border officers at small crossings face hazards that range from high radon levels to poor heating and pests. The report by Canada Border Services Agency says some even have a lack of drinking water and proper shelter. It says the government must go ahead with planned improvements to buildings and computer systems at these smaller crossings in order to meet promises made under the new Canada-US perimeter security deal.

ARE THE PM’S PROTESTS HE WAS TAKEN OUT OF CONTEXT ON RURAL GUN OWNERS BALONEY?

A host of federal and provincial politicians jumped on Prime Minister Stephen Harper for saying earlier this month that gun ownership in rural Canada was partly for home security. When some of Harper’s critics suggested his comments would encourage Canadians to take the law into their own hands, the prime minister had to make a clarification. He said he never suggested that Canadians are allowed to take the law into their own hands. Was Harper correct in saying he was misinterpreted?


 

Sign in to comment.