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Liberal gas plant scandal trial scheduled for September 2017

David Livingston and Laura Miller, who were McGuinty’s chief of staff and deputy chief of staff, deny the charges


 

TORONTO – Two of former Ontario premier Dalton McGuinty’s top staffers are set to go on trial in September 2017 on breach of trust and mischief charges.

David Livingston and Laura Miller, who were McGuinty’s chief of staff and deputy chief of staff, were charged after a police investigation into the deletion of emails about the Liberals’ decision to cancel two gas plants prior to the 2011 election, at a cost of up to $1.1 billion.

They face charges of breach of trust, mischief in relation to data and misuse of a computer system to commit the offence of mischief.

Police have alleged in court documents that Livingston and Miller hired her partner – a computer expert under contract to the Liberals – to wipe clean about 20 hard drives in the premier’s office.

Both Miller and Livingston have denied the charges.

Their lawyers appeared in court Thursday and scheduled the trial for six weeks starting Sept. 11, 2017.

The case will also be back in court June 28 of this year for a disclosure motion, and Feb. 21, 2017 for a focus hearing.

The federal Crown is prosecuting the case instead of Ontario’s Ministry of the Attorney General.

Miller has accused the provincial police of having a bias against her because of a complaint she filed with the Ontario Independent Police Review Director. She has raised more than $74,000 to fund her defence through a crowdsourcing website.

Miller now works as the B.C. Liberal Party’s executive director. She stepped down when the charges were laid last year, but the party’s executive board reappointed her in March.

It was the Ontario Liberals’ initial refusal to hand over gas plant documents to the legislature’s justice committee that sparked a contempt debate that eventually forced McGuinty to resign as premier under a cloud of scandal in October 2012.

Wynne has apologized repeatedly for the gas plants scandal, which the opposition parties called “an expensive Liberal seat-saver campaign.”

The gas plants scandal is one of several criminal investigations the Liberals have faced.

The Ontario Provincial Police are looking into financial irregularities at the Ornge air ambulance service, and potential breaches of a bribery section of the Election Act related to a 2015 byelection in Sudbury, Ont. A Liberal fundraiser was charged in a criminal investigation over the same byelection allegations, but those charges were stayed.

The provincial police also recently started another investigation after Trillium Power Wind Corp. complained to police about the alleged destruction of documents in a lawsuit it filed against the province.


 

Liberal gas plant scandal trial scheduled for September 2017

  1. The problem is Wind and Solar are not reducing C02 and our government will not admit this costly failure. Ontario’s professional Engineers, those tasked with generation, transmission and billing, have reported the problem. our government continues to build more wind and solar.

    Reference: “Ontario’s Electricity Dilemma – Achieving Low Emissions at Reasonable Electricity Rates”. Ontario Society of Professional Engineers (OSPE). April 2015.
    (Archived at: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.ospe.on.ca/resource/resmgr/DOC_advocacy/2015_Presentation_Elec_Dilem.pdf)

    Page 15 of 23. “Why Will Emissions Double as We Add Wind and Solar Plants ?”

    – Wind and Solar require flexible backup generation.

    – Nuclear is too inflexible to backup renewables without expensive engineering changes to the reactors.

    – Flexible electric storage is too expensive at the moment.

    – Consequently natural gas provides the backup for wind and solar in North America.

    – When you add wind and solar you are actually forced to reduce nuclear generation to make room for more natural gas generation to provide flexible backup.

    – Ontario currently produces electricity at less than 40 grams of CO2 emissions/kWh.

    – Wind and solar with natural gas backup produces electricity at about 200 grams of CO2 emissions/kWh. Therefore adding wind and solar to Ontario’s grid drives CO2 emissions higher. From 2016 to 2032 as Ontario phases out nuclear capacity to make room for wind and solar, CO2 emissions will double (2013 LTEP data).

    – In Ontario, with limited economic hydro and expensive storage, it is mathematically impossible to achieve low CO2 emissions at reasonable electricity prices without nuclear generation.

  2. For an update on the Health Impacts of Wind Turbines, here is a talk by Carmen Krogh, speaking at University of Waterloo.
    https://livestream.com/itmsstudio/events/7194480

    DATE: Wednesday, March 29, 2017
    TIME: 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM
    LOCATION: DC 1302, University of Waterloo.

    TITLE: Industrial wind turbines can harm humans
    PRESENTER: Carmen M Krogh

    ABSTRACT:
    The topic of the risk of harm to human health associated with wind energy facilities is controversial and debated worldwide. On May 7, 2014, Carmen Krogh presented a seminar at the University of Waterloo which considered some of the research dating back to the early 1980’s. A snapshot of some of the current research available in 2014 was provided. The research is challenged in part by the complexities and numerous variables and knowledge gaps associated with this subject. This presentation will explore some of these research challenges and provide an update on the growing body of evidence regarding human health risk factors. Included will be the emerging research indicating risks to those working in this field.

    BIO:
    Carmen M Krogh is a full time volunteer and published researcher regarding health effects and industrial wind energy facilities and shares information with communities; individuals; federal, provincial and public health authorities, wind energy developers; the industry; and others. She is an author and a co-author of peer reviewed articles and conference papers presented at wind turbine scientific noise conferences. Ms Krogh is a retired pharmacist whose career includes: senior executive positions at a teaching hospital (Director of Pharmacy); a drug information researcher at another teaching hospital; a Director of a professional organization; and a Director (A) at Health Canada (PMRA). She is the former Director of Publications and Editor in Chief of the Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties (CPS), the book used by physicians, nurses, and health professionals for prescribing information in Canada.

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