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Who’s suing whom

A runaway food cart and too many moose


 

Newfoundland:
Forty people injured in auto collisions with moose have signed on to a class-action lawsuit against the provincial government, claiming it is its responsibility to halve the moose population of Newfoundland. There are 125,000 moose in Newfoundland: one moose for every four citizens, which the plaintiffs’ lawyer claims “exceeds ecological standards by five to 10 times.” In response, the government stated that it is “confident in its moose management strategies and highway maintenance programs.”

Prince Edward Island:
A veterinarian is suing the University of Prince Edward Island for $250,000, claiming the school forced him into retirement. He had worked at the school since 1996 on a renewable contract basis, and in December 2009, he alleges, the school denied him two positions he had applied for in favour of younger candidates.

Ontario:
A career criminal sentenced to 23 years in prison is suing the federal government, alleging that he was placed in solitary confinement for more than three years and denied family visits, leisure activities and rehabilitation programs. Convicted of bank robbery and attempted murder in 1994—he shot three police officers in Port Perry during his getaway—the Kingston man has a total of 160 criminal convictions dating back to 1968, and has escaped from three different prisons during that time.

Alberta:
An Edmonton woman is suing a clothing store after she walked into a sliding glass door, claiming she suffered severe injuries after being knocked to the floor. She argues that the door should not have been closed when the lights were on and customers were still being served.

British Columbia:
A Coquitlam woman is suing Air Transat after an unsecured food cart allegedly came rushing toward her seat as her plane was landing in Cancun, Mexico. She says she suffered a number of injuries, including neck and back pain.


 
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Who’s suing whom

  1. Oh, I can top all of these! A man in British Columbia, was obnoxious to an acquaintance…. His obnoxious behaviour manifested itself over many months, but culminating in an incident which the acquaintance found so rude and irritating, that they wrote to a mutual friend: 'I realize that you two are friends, but I can't stand him, and I need to let you know that I wish to have nothing further to do with him' and "he is no longer welcome in my home". The mutual friend then forwarded on the correspondence to the acquaintance… who responded by writing formally to the man who had banned him "I find this offensive!" and further went on further to reveal that he had "provided a copy of the correspondence to (his) lawyer!"… presumably to try to a suit for having been told that he was no longer welcome in someone's home…. Ummm, I think he just proved unequivocally that the person who banned him was entirely justified for considering the guy personae-non-grata!!!!! What a loser! It takes all kinds!

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