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The Vatican is reining in America’s radical nuns

Nuns, who’ve been critical of the Church’s teaching feel blindsided by the move


 

The mills of the Vatican grind slowly. So when the Roman Catholic Church delivered a critical assessment of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious—an umbrella group whose 1,500 members represent 80 per cent of the 55,000 nuns in America—after considering it for two years, nuns said they felt blindsided. Some, like Sister Simone Campbell, thought the Vatican was miffed over “our health care letter.” She was referring to the standoff between the U.S. government and Catholic bishops over Barack Obama’s health care regulation requiring Catholic institutions to provide employee insurance that covered contraceptives. Dozens of nuns, many of them LCWR members, had signed a letter in support of the measure.

Although the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the Church’s chief doctrinal enforcement body, did not specify the health care issue, many observers read it into the “major areas of concern” the CDF identified. Those included various LCWR stances “not in agreement with the Church’s teaching on human sexuality, and LCWR members criticizing male-only priesthood. The rebuke to the LCWR may be only the Vatican’s first move in reining in American nuns. A much wider ranging Church examination into all women’s religious orders in the U.S., which began in 2006, delivered its report to the pope in December, but the results haven’t yet been made public.


 

The Vatican is reining in America’s radical nuns

  1. I have a lot of friends who’ve looked into joining various orders of nuns, only to be turned off by the radical feminism and open rejection of Catholic teaching they saw within them. There is a good reason that the only female religious orders flourishing in North America are the most traditional and loyal ones. Young ladies who love the Catholic faith aren’t interested in joining covens – they want to carry on the noble tradition of nuns (and monks) passed down through the centuries: poverty, chastity, and obedience.

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