6

Canada signs no-hacking deal with China

Both countries agree not to engage in state-sponsored hacking of business secrets


 
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau(left to right) make their way down the Hall of Honour to take part in a signing ceremony on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, September 22, 2016., 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau(left to right) make their way down the Hall of Honour to take part in a signing ceremony on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, September 22, 2016., 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand

OTTAWA – Canada and China have agreed not to engage in state-sponsored hacking of each other’s trade secrets and business information.

The two countries reached the agreement during a meeting last week that was part of their new high-level national security dialogue.

“The two sides agreed that neither country’s government would conduct or knowingly support cyber-enabled theft of intellectual property, including trade secrets or other confidential business information, with the intent of providing competitive advantages to companies or commercial sectors,” says a communique from the Prime Minister’s Office.

The two sides also had “candid” discussions about a possible extradition treaty, said the statement – something China wants, but that Canada has said is a long way off.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang have deepened the political engagement between the two countries with regular “dialogues” such as the security one that took place last week in Ottawa.

Daniel Jean, Trudeau’s national security adviser, led the talks with Wang Yongqing, the secretary-general of China’s Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission.

Cybersecurity was one the many topics on the agenda, along with counter-terrorism, combating organized crime and regional security issues such as the crisis in Syria and North Korea’s nuclear sabre-rattling.

The government statement says the two sides also discussed “judicial and rule of law issues.”

John McCallum, the former immigration minister now serving as Canada’s ambassador to China, has previously flagged judicial issues as an area of disagreement between the two as Canada tries to deepen its economic ties.

“We disagree on the death penalty,” McCallum told a House Commons committee in March.

“We disagree on some aspects of the rule of law and privately and publicly on how the Chinese government treats human rights advocates.”


 
Filed under:

Canada signs no-hacking deal with China

    • Hmmm, well the Liberals are planning to allow the sale of NorSat to China *without* going thru a full-fledged national security review – a move which seems odd unless one cynically believes that China insisted on the sale as a condition for the free-trade talks that the federal government seems hell-bent on.

        • Yep, Harp was going to sell it. Everyone objected. Australia, Britain etc… Kind of like the deal with Columbia, wink, wink.

          Whatever happened to China shutting down opioid production/exports? Isn’t that what was reported a while back? Trudeau government reaching a deal with China?

        • I can’t find any mention of the Harper government approving the sale of NorSat without a full-fledged national security review.

          The Liberals also reversed the Harper government’s blocking of the sale of ITF Technologies to China. This was done despite the prior recommendation of security officials to block the takeover

          It appears that China is to Trudeau as Russia is to Trump.

          h$$ps://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/us-congressmen-criticize-ottawas-oversight-of-chinese-high-tech-takeovers/article35417357/

          h$$p://nationalpost.com/opinion/andrew-coyne-rush-to-sell-norsat-raises-troubling-questions-about-trudeaus-approach-to-china/wcm/30220c40-3e51-438a-a060-e419a1586430

          • My bad. I think Harp approved cell phone or something like that???

            I knew the Trudeau/Liberal relationship with China was close when they suddenly out thin friggin’ air came up with the infrastructure bank idea. The idea was presented after a visit to China. China had been toying with the idea before the Libs came to power. It should have been carefully looked at not rammed through in an omnibus. I Have a lot of questions.

            Politicians are only around for 4 years. The rest of us think 20 years down the road. I want a good relationship with China. I don’t want them up my ass like the south of us. I know some of us love to hate the south but really, business wise, they have been very good to some of us.

Sign in to comment.