Liberals look to tighten workplace harassment rules - Macleans.ca
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Liberals look to tighten workplace harassment rules

New legislation aims to give workers and employers clear course of action to handle allegations of bullying, harassment and sexual harassment


 
Federal Labour Minister Patty Hajdu speaks to reporters during a weekend meeting of the national caucus on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Saturday, March 25, 2017. Hajdu, a Thunder Bay MP, says she's not surprised by "appalling" new numbers that suggest the Ontario city has the highest rate of metropolitan hate crime in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Federal Labour Minister Patty Hajdu speaks to reporters during a weekend meeting of the national caucus on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Saturday, March 25, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

OTTAWA – Federal labour rules are in for a regulatory overhaul to crack down on harassment in the workplace – from Parliament Hill to local bank branches.

New legislation being unveiled today is aimed at giving workers and their employers a clear course of action to better deal with allegations of bullying, harassment and sexual harassment.

The changes will merge separate labour standards for sexual harassment and violence and subject them to the same scrutiny and dispute resolution process.

Once passed, the legislation would also allow anyone unhappy with how their dispute is being handled to complain to the federal labour minister, who could step in to investigate.

The Liberals wants the rules to apply to politicians, their staff and other Parliament Hill employees.

Department officials say it could take a year or more before the rules come into effect, since regulations would have to be crafted once the bill receives parliamentary approval.


 

Liberals look to tighten workplace harassment rules

  1. The main obstacle to this is the tribal nature of most organizations (military, police, church, education, healthcare, any business, financial institution – in fact all workplaces). The problems are:
    – no way to lodge a complaint outside of the tribe (the worst route is the human resources department, as one comment said- would you go to the k g b to complain about P u t i n?
    – too many self regulated groups that make their own rules or act outside of their scope (teacher unions investigating sex assault complaints, judiciary judging their own, etc). The notion of regulating professional practice stops when the laws of society are being broken.

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