'All allegations have been unfounded' - Macleans.ca
 

‘All allegations have been unfounded’


 

From QP this morning, Lawrence Cannon’s response to question about the latest Afghan detainee allegations.

Mr. Speaker, in the case of allegations, senior Canadian Forces leadership immediately ordered investigations into all of this. The Canadian Forces make sure that any allegation put forward is looked into and all of these investigations will determine whether or not the allegations are founded or unfounded, but up to now, all allegations have been unfounded.


 

‘All allegations have been unfounded’

  1. Okay, but the last posting just referenced a document that it said it took the forces two years to investigate an allegation.

    From what I understand of the Forces, when senior brass orders you to do something, you don't do it in two years, you do it now. Or yesterday.

    Something doesn't jive.

  2. Irrelevant. Parliament has the right to provide oversight to government on any matter, especially by majority vote, especially in a time of war. Produce the documents, now, dammit.

    • And management (ie Government) has every right to restrict information in the interests of national security. And we do happen to be at war, a very vicious war. So the government gets the benefit of my doubt.

      • The fact that you think that the government is "management" in a scenario involving the two parties "government" and "Parliament" indicates to me just how little some Canadians understand our system of government.

        Parliament is ABOVE the government on the managerial org chart, not below.

        • Or one could equally argue that Parliament IS the government of Canada.

        • Why could Liberal MP Derek Lee not manage to cast his vote last week (regarding foreign aid and contraceptives) if Parliament is to be ABOVE all important?

          Why not answer the real questions, Mr.Kitchener

      • If the government is management, then Parliament is most definitely the board of directors.

  3. There's something not quite right about this document "release", the near immediate media and opposition identification of potential issues therein and the government's easy dismissal thereof.

    Speculation…. could it be that the PMO released these docs not only to give Speaker Milliken more reason to defer/delay a privilege ruling in favour of the opposition but, also as a trap for them? By trap, I mean the PMO knows – of course – every detail of what is contained in yesterday's doc release,and they have pre-constructed solid defenses (with evidence) against each one. Thus the PMO sets the opposition up to pursue claims the PMO already knows are dead ends. It also doesn't hurt that this is taking medai attention away from the LibThink in Montreal this weekend.

    Have I become completely paranoid about this government or what?

    • If you're right then the opposition should have simply refused to accept the docs at all. It occurred to me yesterday that they might have strengthened their case with the speaker if they had simply refused to play along. Although that would run the risk of them looking obstructionist themselves, but so what, either you have a principle[ parliamentary sovereignty] worth fighting for, or you don't. I hope you're wrong. That might lead one to suspect there's a mind worthy of Rove behind this…and little or no corresponding savvy on the opposition benches.

      • " either you have a principle[ parliamentary sovereignty] worth fighting for, or you don't."

        Why not ask Liberal MP Derek Lee, who is afterall the brians behind finding Parliament surpreme, yet stands back when a vote within Parliament is called for. I know the LPC doesn't want to see this blantant oversight, but I certainly hope the people of Canada can spot a phoney from afar

  4. And you can take Lawrence Cannon's word on that.

    Actually, you have to, since the government refuses to respect the will of Parliament.

    • Personally, Lawrence Cannon saying that things are fine inspires even less confidence than Peter MacKay saying it. No small feat, that.