9

BTC: Thin line


 

3,994,682. Total votes received by the Conservative party in 2004, Stephen Harper’s first election as leader.

3,629,990. Total votes received by the Liberal party in 2008, Stephane Dion’s first election as leader.


 

BTC: Thin line

  1. Lesson learned: Martin I guess should have put out ads after ads calling Harper a ninny. Saying his politics are bush-like is not the same as assassinating his character, a lesson that Harper schooled every future leader.
    Guess we should be proud of that, right?

  2. I think we should all be clear on one thing:

    This election was not about winning a majority (although I have no doubt that Harper would have gladly accepted that as an additional bonus). Instead, it was a “Dump Dion” election. Harper could see, like many other Canadians, that Dion was becoming increasingly dangerous for the future well-being and prosperity of this country and probably felt he had to get rid of him as quickly as possible.

    Hey, I support that, because I just hate it when a life-long Marxist masquerades as a “Liberal” and then takes the role of party leader with only 8-11% of the support of Liberal party member (yes, folks, that’s what the undemocratic delegated convention vote bought the Liberals in the end).

    And Dion wonders why donations have dried up?

  3. Werner, do you think the US Congressional Budget Office is full of Marxists too? They conclude that a carbon tax with substantial tax cuts, weighed toward the lower income brackets, would be several times more efficient and much better for the economy than a cap and trade.

    This is not a right or left thing, it is trying to do what is right. Being realists, the Congressional Budget Office also provides advice on how to design a cap and trade to be most like a carbon tax in case politicians want to hide a tax behind words like cap and trade. Doesn’t make it more or less Marxist though, just means that politicians sometimes have to spend our money less efficiently and cost the economy more overall because they cannot sell what is right. Most are not even willing to try.

  4. 3,276,929. Total votes received by the Canadian Alliance party in 2000, Stockwell Day’s first election as leader.

    Stockwell Day’s term as leader: 17 months

    Stephane Dion’s term as leader: 22 months

  5. … and of course Gordon Frickin’ Campbell, Mr. Right Wing himself has turned into a marxist. Apparently.

    However, I think Aaron’s comparison is spurious, because (as noted) Harper was growing the Conservative brand whereas the Liberal Brand is dying right now.

  6. 350,000 is a lot of votes.

  7. “This election was not about winning a majority (although I have no doubt that Harper would have gladly accepted that as an additional bonus). Instead, it was a “Dump Dion” election. Harper could see, like many other Canadians, that Dion was becoming increasingly dangerous for the future well-being and prosperity of this country and probably felt he had to get rid of him as quickly as possible.”

    You think this election happened because Dion was a disaster as leader of the opposition and Harper felt that this was the best way to strengthen the…Liberal Party of Canada? Did you really think that comment through before you typed it out? Because I’m pretty sure even the most slavishly partisan Harperistas don’t even think that.

  8. sw deserves the prize for comment of the day… nice.

  9. “You think this election happened because Dion was a disaster as leader of the opposition and Harper felt that this was the best way to strengthen the…Liberal Party of Canada?”

    Well, no. It’s (seen as) the best way to weaken and ultimately to destroy the Liberal Party of Canada as ‘natural governing party’ of the country.

    Or so said Tom Flanagan in August:

    Tom Flanagan, a political scientist at the University of Calgary, believes Harper would be satisfied to return with a strengthened minority — a result that would throw the Liberals into chaos, thereby advancing the prime minister’s longterm strategy of destroying Canada’s so-called natural governing party.

    “I don’t think Harper has to be thinking about a majority at all,” Flanagan said in an interview.

    “Strategically, this is sort of a prolonged war of attrition.”

    Get them another ten million in debt (they took out loans to finance the campaign) and force another leadership convention on them.

    Which is why, incidentally, it was a dumb idea to force out Dion — it’s exactly what Harper wanted.

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