Free ride

by Aaron Wherry

The Globe finds six NDP MPs who were elected on the cheap.

Another one of the NDP no-spenders is Philip Toone, a lawyer and a first-time MP for Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine. “I had me and my orange tie,” Mr. Toone remembered, saying he relied on word-of-mouth to spread news of his campaign. “Miracles are rare.”

Mr. Toone didn’t put up lawn signs or billboards and recorded no campaign expenses – though he did make note of $12.50 in auditing work that was marked as received in August, four months after the election.

Three of those MPs are from the McGill Four, who I profiled last fall. Another is Ruth Ellen Brosseau, who I wrote about here and here.




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Free ride

  1. Not even a toonie?

  2. Stories like this will finally put to bed the notion that people vote for the person, rather than the party.

    •  it’s  a strong indicator many people might tend towards this, but we knew or suspected that already.

    • No, it just proves that parties have convinced many to vote for a party.  We still vote for a person.

      • Which is the most depressing part of the whole thing.

  3. In Quebec City campaigns were extremely cheap as well.

  4. Funny.  But it causes me to wonder how many Conservatives could have been
    elected in Alberta without spending a cent. Completely different circumstances,
    I know. But fun to think about.

    •  Maybe they could spend party $ on the shadow candidates with the savings.

    • They’d have to spend heavily to get the nomination in Alberta.

      This circumstance is unique because in many ridings in the country its rare to get a party nomination, let alone be elected an MP.

      These people were basically drafted because nobody else would do it

      •  That’s why he said “completely different circumstances, I know…”

    • The funny thing is that the Conservatives spend quite a bit to get elected in Alberta. The numbers for 2008 are available and even in safe seats like Jason Kenny’s Seat (73.83%) they spent $40,322. Most of the seats in Edmonton and Calgary, they’re spending somewhere between the mid to high five digits. Even in Stephen Harper’s riding of Calgary-Southwest, where he got 72.9% of the vote in 2008 the party spent $61,102.

      • Well, that’s where the expenditures were claimed. Given the CPC’s history of campaign irregularities, who knows where the money was really spent?

  5. You get what you pay for.

    • He who pays the piper calls the tune.

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