Here’s hoping Danny Williams got Canadian-style heart surgery

by John Geddes

Newfoundland Premier Danny Williams has finally done an interview discussing his decision to go to the U.S. for heart surgery. You’ll recall that critics of public health insurance on both sides of the border pounced on this high-profile case of medical tourism as evidence that the Canadian system is hopelessly second-rate.

But wait a minute. I see that Williams says his problem was with his mitral valve. Now, I’m no expert, but I seem to remember reading something recently about that particular part of the old ticker.

Oh, yes, here it is: a news release from Dec. 3, 2009, announcing that the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine had just published a feature article on the latest techniques for reconstructing the valve, which separates the heart’s two chambers so blood flows during a normal beat.

Maybe you’re guessing now that the premier decided to travel to the famous hospital where one of the physicians who authored the article fixes hearts. That would make sense. But here’s the funny thing: the authors are Dr. Thierry Mesana of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and Dr. Subodh Verma of St. Michael’s Hospital at University of Toronto.

Apparently Ottawa and Toronto have somehow managed to emerge as leading centres for both the theory and practice of heart surgery—in particular, it seems, the operation Williams needed—despite the horrors of socialized medicine.

In case this leaves you fearing that the the premier might have received substandard care in the U.S., please don’t worry. I understand  they have excellent physicians there. And that New England Journal of Medicine article is specifically meant to spread the word of the latest surgical techniques everywhere.

Here’s hoping Danny Williams got Canadian-style heart surgery

  1. So you're saying Williams went to the US for no reason? That he's either stupid or lying?

    • OK. so you've taken the position that he's stupid. Fair enough. I'm not a fan of the man myself, for several reasons, but I must say I don't consider him to be stupid.

    • Although you seem to be having some difficulty understanding the concept, what you are being told is that Danny boy , although when he talks as the official talking government head, he feels Newfoundland health care is adequate for the newfies. When he talks for private citizen premiere Danny boy he believes its not adequate, period, don't be naive. Anyone who believes otherwise obviously is a prime example of why Danny and all the other hypocrites continue to be re elected while they feed their egos and financial appetites

      • Where did he make any comment, even by his actions, about "Newfoundland healthcare"????

        He has a very very specific heart problem with a very very specific surgery that is performed by very very few people in the world. It happened to be invented by Canadians which tells us that our system is not preventing leading-edge technologies from being developed in Canada.

        Note that his doctors do not appear to have recommended "just go anywhere but Newfoundland". They recommended a very specific heart centre from among the hundreds and hundreds of heart centres in the US and Canada. That tells me that that particular clinic has developed or hired the kind of specific expertise that this specific heart needs.

        That is how medicine works. There are medical systems, and we can debate them, but medical practice is the same everywhere: go where the individual doctor has the specific skills and experience that this patient needs. We're a much smaller country and NL even smaller. You just can't assume the system is wrong because they can't develop that highly a specialized skill in one province.

      • Wow, I'm not really sure where to start on that.

        First off, he didn't say any such thing. The surgery is not available in Newfoundland. What that says is that a place with a low population doesn't have the latest and greatest surgery procedures, which is really not surprising- regardless of the system used, it's most likely the procedure would still not be available there. So any way you slice it, he had to travel.

        Now, he has a condo in Florida. He's had it for a while, long before he had any indication of health troubles. While it is possible he bought it in anticipation of requiring health care, I think the real motivation was to buy a vacation home in a place where he likes to vacation (along with millions of other Canadians.) So he had to travel outside the province, knew he would have to spend a month recovering and would want to do so in a warm place. His doctor told him that he could get the surgery done in Florida. He has a condo in Florida. So he went to Florida to get the surgery. Makes sense to me.

        Next, a bit of advice. If you don't want to seem like an ignorant ass, you may want to refrain from calling Newfoundlanders "Newfies." It's like calling people from Quebec "frogs" or people from out west "stupid redneck hicks who wish they were Americans."

    • He went to the U.S. because he's rich and can afford it. As he says himself, it was his choice.

      Tonight he tries to suggest on the one hand that it was his choice, and on the other, that he didn't have a choice. Having fixed the two valves of his heart, maybe they can find corrective surgery for his chronic condition of talking out of both sides of his mouth.

      • Yes, I wonder if they can do that sort of surgery in Canada, it's sorely needed. We have many sufferers of two-mouths syndrome.

    • You have the wrong reason.

      Williams went to the U.S. because it's February and he has at least one residential property in Florida and Florida is in the U.S.

    • “So you're saying Williams went to the US for no reason? That he's either stupid or lying? That his doctors are stupid or lying?“

      John`s blog said none of these things. It`s an attempt to provide an answer to those who used the Williams situation as proof of the evils of socialized medicine.

      And I don`t think YOUR intelligence would recognize being insulted.

      • Maybe you could use your hefty intelligence to enlighten me then. If WiIlliams himself says his doctors advised him to get the treatment in the US, and Williams decided they were right, and then he went right ahead and made the plans and flew to the US and had the procedure there, then your explanation for this is what? He wanted to go to Disneyworld? Please enlighten me.

      • Maybe you could use your hefty intelligence to enlighten me then. If WiIlliams himself says his doctors advised him to get the treatment in the US, and Williams decided they were right, and then he went right ahead and made the plans and flew to the US and had the procedure there, then your explanation for this is what? He wanted to go to Disneyworld? Please enlighten me.

        • The article says his doctors recommended he get treatment out-of-province (not the US per se). He chose to go to Miami. Apparently he has a condo in Florida, presumably near-ish to the hospital (that is, I assume it's in the Miami area, so that if he needed follow-up at the hospital, that would be convenient; if the condo's in, say, Tampa or Jacksonville, that doesn't hold…). So the choice to go Miami is perhaps not an unreasonable one.
          Plus recuperating in FL in winter is preferable to same in the Toronto-Ottawa-Montreal corridor — maybe if it was July he'd have chosen differently :)

          • Wrong.

            Williams told NTV that his doctor recommended he have it done at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami, Fla., where the procedure is minimally invasive.

            Next.

          • And, actually, "his doctor recommended he have it done at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami, Fla." doesn't preclude his doctor having equally recommended other locations. (That is, if his doctors had given him a short list of places it is likely the lead would have still only mentioned the place he actually went — it's shorter and contains two messages: what his doctor's recommended and where he went)

          • Sorry — was recalling the premier's quote further in the article ("…go out of province."). But the point still stands: if he had to go out of province from St John's, there is no general driving factor to prefer Ottawa or Montreal over Miami or Boston. (Though there may be particular factors in a given case.) He'd still have to pay the diff. between his province's coverage and the hospital bill, and my understanding is that Canadian hospital procedure fees are not much different from US ones (though some secondary services, eg private rooms, might not be available).

          • Actually, Williams refused to follow the advice of his regular doctors, who had suggested minimally invasive mitral valve repair via partial sternotomy. This not being to his liking, he called up some cardiologist he knows in New Jersey (apparently originally from NL) who recommended the Miami hospital. He relates no attempt to determine if the same procedure could be done elsewhere in Canada (which it can and is).

          • Wrong, his friend who currently works in the states recommended the miami doctor.

            His original doctor recommended he have out or province surgery.

            Now, I could be wrong, but a NJ doctor would know Americain doctrors better, no?

  2. Or both?

  3. I'm the kind of guy who doesn't like to speculate without decent information. So I still have no idea why the guy went to the US.

    Although in general, short of an extremely rare type of surgery not really available in Canada, there doesn't seem to be a good reason to travel to America for their expensive health care.

    • I like the premise of not speculating without decent information, just so you know as I proceed to speculate without decent information.

      So, the guy has a specific heart ailment. In addition to being premiere of Newfoundland and Labrador, he's also filthy rich. NL doesn't have the resources (doctors or machines) to perform this specific operation. He has two choices. He can pay out of his own pocket and go south, or he can pay much less and jump the queue in Ontario. Or he can refuse to jump the queue and feel unwell for longer (that's three choices but who's really counting that one?)

      Thanks, Danny! You made the right choice.

      • Do we know he would have had to wait in Canada? It sounds kind of serious, and usually we do serious stuff pretty quick.

  4. So he chose to go stateside and pay for treatment even though the world's leading experts could have provided it for free in Canada?

    Good grief…the disparity between the two systems must be even greater than I thought.

    • There is a disparity. By most commonly used measures the Canadian system is marginally better.
      That's because – aside from the method of payment – it's basically the same system.

      He had the surgery in Florida because he could buy a post-op suite.
      And because his Florida condo is in ….. Florida.

      • And because Florida's February weather is not the same as Newfoundland's.

  5. I know this is a bit of a stretch, but could it be he decided to go to Florida to get the surgery because it's far better to recover from major heart surgery there in his big-ass condo rather than Toronto in February? I'm just saying, if I just got my heart tinkered with, I'd rather deal with the 2 hour drive from Miami to Sarasota than the 2 hour drive to Pearson, then the 3 hour flight to Sarasota.

    I'm no doctor, and I don't know what Danny was thinking, but conciser the facts:
    - He had to leave the province to get the surgery.
    -It's winter.
    - He has a big place in Florida to hang out in and recover.
    - It's winter. In Canada.
    - Miami to Sarasota is just a slightly longer drive than downtown Toronto to Pearson airport.

    He had to travel to get the surgery done regardless. While he could have gotten the surgery done in Canada, he also had to recover. He has a place to recover in Florida. It's a 3.5 hour flight from Toronto to Sarasota or Toronto to St. John's. (To go Ottawa or Montreal to St. John's goes through Toronto. Or hell. Trust me, it's bad enough when you're healthy.)

    Now, what does this say about the Canadian health care system? Nothing. MCP would cover his cost to travel to get the surgery, as well as lodging after to recover. It made more sense for him to go to Florida and get it done. For him to stay in Canada just to satisfy a few mainland commentators (and commenters) would have cost the system more money.

    But hey, don't let logic, health or economics get in the way of a good ol' fashioned Danny bash.

  6. that partial quote should read "…going outside the province."
    I gotta learn to cut-and-paste….

  7. Reality check. It's nobody's business but the Premier's. Get over it!!

  8. I think the point of the post is simply that, according to the detractors, this medical breakthrough couldn't happen up here. Yet, it did.

    As to why Williams went to the US to get the delivery of the Canadian medical breakthrough, no one on this thread has any real clue.

    But everyone on this thread – either side – and in this whole discussion misses a very fundamental aspect of how medicine is practiced. Doctors may practice in a "US system" or a "Canadian system" but they do not practice "US medicine" or "Canadian medicine". When it comes to super specialized medicine, there are only so many experts available to perform the surgery. There are any number of reasons to go to one or another – anything from something as significant as Dr. X has done more of surgery Y on patients showing Z tissue deterioration to Dr. A is on mat leave/sabbatical so you'll have to Dr. B. In Canada, we have that many fewer people and therefore that many fewer doctors and therefore that many fewer super specialists. We also have that many fewer patients meaning that much less experience for new technologies.

  9. [cont] And it is not just a US-Canada way of practicing medicine. I have a cousin who lives in Halifax who has a highly specialized practice in skin diseases. He treats patients from all over the world because of his expertise.

    Until we know why Williams' doctors made the recommendation they did, we don't know squat and it is too moronically simplistic to say "actions speak louder than words" in this case.

    To me, it is far more revealing that they suggested a specific hospital clinic in Miami as opposed to the hundreds of other heart clinics in the US and Canada. That tells me there was a specialist there who fit Williams condition to a T.

  10. We Canadians, better hope that the US does not pass the Obama health care reform or we will not continue to have the option(s) that Mr. Williams had.

    • oh please

    • What option would that be pablo. The option of having your head removed from your own sphincter?

  11. So for sake of argument, lets suppose his doctors shopped around and found the earliest available opening on an operating table that is on a list of acceptable quality vendors for this operation. Furthermore, it is none of anybody else's business where a rich man goes for his personal medical care if he pays for it out of his own pocket.
    I also recall about three plus decades ago, a dispute arose between the doctors here in Ontario and the government of the day over rates of remuneration. Well after some time elapsed, the Health Minister of that Cabinet had a heart attack. It was alleged that while he lay on a gurney in the hall way of the emergency ward in a Toronto hospital, some intern stopped and asked him: " You are who? And you want what?" The patient was duly taken care of and recovered in sort order, BUT there was very little heard of a dispute between our doctors and that government from that day on!
    What most of the kibitzers are failing to mention is that today we have layers and layers of bureaucracy on the payer side, ie. the government, that do nothing but run up the cost of health care. I resent bureaucrats making decisions about how many operations that will be funded or what tests they will allow payment to be made for. Push pencils are not care givers and need to be limited to a bare minimum.

    • If you think bureaucracy is bad here, you should see the insides of a US hospital.

      Here, you have one insurance company and one entity making decisions about what should be covered and what shouldn't.

      Do you have any idea the amount of paperwork involved with dozens and dozens of different insurance companies, all with different forms, different conditions, different lists of inclusions and exclusions, different caps, different co-pay arrangements, different portability restrictions, different out-of-state restrictions.

      And none of them accountable. If you don't like the way healthcare is being organized, or what gets delisted, you can't switch (of those who have healthcare, almost all of it with employer insurance plans) and you can't vote against them and you can't use Access to Information laws to find out about their decision making.

      If bureaucracy and accountability are your concerns, steer clear of the US. France on the other hand…

    • Most of the "run-up" in the cost of health care is in areas outside the control of those
      bureaucrats …. the cost of pharmaceuticals and the cost of physician "services" – the
      stuff that doctors order before and after they do anything.
      Those bureaucrats are there to squeeze as much service out of the areas they can
      control – the people who provide those services. Part of the way they do that is to make
      things unnecessarily complicated so that people think twice about what is needed.
      They do that because, in a lot of cases, doctors don't know what they are involved with,
      so they do everything.

  12. Mr Williams has every right to do what is right for him.– It did do damage though, but not to Canadians , to Americans trying to get a system.as good as ours. We all know how Fox News and others used
    Mr. Williams.

  13. So if an ordinary Newfoundlander had the very same mitral valve condition as his premier, what are the odds that he would be operated on by Dr. Mesana or Dr. Verma? And how long would he have to wait for an operation?

    • If he really couldn't have it done in Nfld., he could easily have it done in Halifax, where mitral
      valve surgery has been done for years. And if it was a life-threatening situation it would be
      done right away. There's misinformation everywhere …. even in blogs ( shock! ).

      • It wasn't life threatening. Hence, we can be sure that he could have got it done in Canada sometime this decade for sure.

      • I have absolutely no idea about the severity of Danny's heart condition, but my guess is that it wasn't immediately life-threatening, so he would have had to wait. He can't jump queues, so going to the US was probably his only option for immediate surgery.

        • It was reported as being diagnosed some time ago but was considered as being
          non-urgent. A "watch and wait" situation. The same report (can't find the link right now)
          indicated that more recent testing showed a situation of rapid deterioration.
          Queues are "jumped" on a daily basis … because conditions change and queues change.

      • The report mentions that a minimally invasive technique was used to treat the problem…..is that technique available in Halifax? Will that turn out to be the difference between Canadian and US options?

        • The report also mentions that his surgery was scheduled for 2.5 hours and clocked
          in at 6 hours. The technique matters to doctors. To the patient, results matter.

          I have a friend who had a hip repair done last year. The shiny new doctor wanted to
          try a new European technique that would take longer but promised to speed the rehab
          period and get him back on the golf course quicker. It didn't and he wound up with a
          blood clot in the leg. The technique has not since been used by that doctor. Which is
          probably a shame. I suspect he and my friend simply paid the price for being early adopters.

          • Ummm, OK…

            I hate speculating, but apparently not enough to not speculate. My wild-ass theory is that DW's NL doctor says:
            – Danny, you need surgery, and pretty soon
            – no one in NL does this surgery
            – there are some world class surgeons in Ontario, although they use a "standard" technique that will require a lengthy recovery time
            – there are some other surgeons in Florida who are pretty well as good, and they use a minimally invasive technique that will allow you to recover much quicker
            – so, which option do you prefer?

            Williams chooses the quicker recovery option (Florida), which has the happy consequence of being available almost immediately, whereas the Ontario surgery would have been booked for late March, unless his condition worsened even more, at which time he would have been seen in Ontario "right away".

          • And – I'm not sure if it's in the article I linked or not – but apparently Danny called
            a Newfie doctor who practices in New Jersey and that doctor recommended the
            the Florida job. Maybe because that is what a New Jersey doctor knew ? Who knows ?
            Speculation, sure .. bur relationships matter." My neighbour's nephew is a doc in New
            Jersey. He seemed like a good guy when I met him a few months back. I'll ask him.
            And since I'm sort of a paranoid l'il freak anyway I'll trust what he says instead of sticking
            myself in a "private" room where I'll have no privacy anywhere in Canada. Screw'em all."

          • Don't disagree with your thoughts at all.

            Btw, from CBC Radio this morning, the "routine" method of doing this surgery involves breaking the sternum so as to gain access to the heart so as to perform the valve repair job, and I gathered that this is what he was "offered" in Canada.

            The minimally invasive technique does not involve breaking the sternum, and I gather that it does require some very rare equipment. It does have the advantage of a much shorter recovery time, but I will guess that the actual surgery is more expensive.

            Anyhoo, I am confident that this case does not show that Canada's health care system is useless or broken beyond repair. OTOH, there is room for improvement, mostly in the area of wait times.

    • Odds are he would go to Halifax, or Toronto, or Hamilton, or Ottawa. Maybe Montreal, depending upon the cost share agreement between the provinces. That said, Newfoundland has a program, as do most provinces, that will pay for out-of-country medical treatment in emergencies (if you're already there) or by prior approval, backed up by your doctor.

      The procedure is here: http://www.health.gov.nl.ca/mcp/html/health.htm

      As to waiting time? Depends on Buddy Wasisname's condition? In really bad shape, he's in right away.

    • Odds are he would go to Halifax, or Toronto, or Hamilton, or Ottawa. Maybe Montreal, depending upon the cost share agreement between the provinces. That said, Newfoundland has a program, as do most provinces, that will pay for out-of-country medical treatment in emergencies (if you're already there) or by prior approval, backed up by your doctor.

      The procedure is here: http://www.health.gov.nl.ca/mcp/html/health.htm

      As to waiting time? Depends on Buddy Wasisname's condition? In really bad shape, he's in right away.

  14. As with so many other things like this, the truth is very simple: The man owns a condo in Florida. Where would you rather recover from heart surgery this time of year, Florida or Newfoundland? Gee, tough choice.

  15. Geddes report is about nothing, really. What relevance does this report have?

    Everywhere in the western world are new and better procedures being developed.

    The question remains why a provincial premier choose to be treated in the US. I'm not saying that he shouldn't be able to make such a choice, but why?

    Since health care falls within provincial jurisdiction, and since the Premier serves as head of the province, and since Williams, as premier of the province choose to have surgery out of nation, I think an honest explanation is in order, for sure.

    Or, are we ready to accept that Williams, as private persona, can look for the best, but when acting as public persona, he will agree to the mantra that "one fits all?"

    Danny Williams the loudmouth is awfully quiet these days…..

  16. "Apparently Ottawa and Toronto have somehow managed to emerge as leading centres for both the theory and practice of heart surgery"

    In light of this development, can we expect Ottawa and Toronto to be destinations that people from all over the world travel TO for heart surgery? Is this the start of a new MEDICAL TOURISM industry in Canada that caters to foreigners , especially Americans? Perhaps this is the type of industry Ontarion needs to replace some of the lost manufacturing jobs. It would require more hospitals , and clinics , but if you build them , the patients will come

    • I believe that for many procedures, patients ALL READY come from all over the world to get treated in Toronto, just like Americans sometimes go to Europe for certain treatments, or anyone from X might go to Y to get the best treatment available. I don't know about "medical tourism" per se, but there are plenty of people from outside of Canada who travel to some of our excellent hospitals and research centres to get various treatments. In Toronto, Sick Kids for pediatrics and the Princess Margaret for cancer treatments being two well known examples.

  17. Mr. Geddes, the press release to which you link says "repair, don't replace" faulty mitral valves. Fine. Dandy. What the press release does NOT mention is whether the Mesana / Verma innovation was the minimally invasive technique that Premier Williams underwent. Before I accept your premise that Williams was disingenuous about the not-available-in-Canada line, can you confirm that Mesana-Verma indeed developed the minimally invasive technique?

  18. Those that are not doctors shouldn't be writing articles on it.

    He has a condo in Florida – as I understand it. Perhaps he want to recupe there?

  19. My hypotheses remains that given all the healthcare woes in NFLD, it was politically safer for DW to go the US than Toronto or Ottawa, and likely neutral for his health.

  20. The existence of one (1) surgical procedure, out of tens of thousands of procedures, developed in Canada does not automagically constitute a robust defense of Canada's "health" "care" system, but rather seriously indicts the reason, or lack thereof, of the individual attempting to make such a claim. It's mathematically incorrect, and grotesquely so.

    • expecting a statement to be automaticaly accepted as fact is… how do you say, but rather seriously indicts the reason, or lack thereof, of the individual attempting to make such a claim. It's mathematically incorrect, and grotesquely so.

  21. The difference between the Canadian and American options was the invasiveness of the procedure (having the sternum opened to provide access) and so the recovery time. The only story here is how badly the Premier's office managed information. A brief press release explaining what was happening the day after his departure for Florida would have prevented this non-story from having such legs.

    • In a later post, I have a couple of Canadian surgeons wade in on the "minimally invasive surgery" question. It seems to be readily available in Canada, but isn't always recommended.

      http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/02/23/canadian-healt

  22. I wish people would read multiple stories before making any sort of decision or commentary. He could have had the operation done in Canada, but it would require breaking bones, leading to a longer recovery time. He was informed of a doctor in Florida who can (and does) do the operation with a mere incision instead of breaking bones. Danny Williams could afford to have this procedure (with the millions he made as a businessman, not using taxpayer money) and decided to have this procedure instead. It's not that he COULDN'T have his problem fixed in Canada, it's just that the alternative provided by an American specialist was more convenient for him. Detractors of Canada's healthcare system will say that this points to fundamental problems with our healthcare. In reality, it's just a case of a man with money doing something in his own best interests, and something that has no impact on anybody else. The fact that he's a premier is irrelevant; his health, his choice.

  23. The difference is anyone in the US with insurance could have received the same care your millionaire received. In Canada only the rich get such care.

    • @ BrianC: What you're saying is most likely not true. American insurance firms are renowned for their declination of insurance claims. They would probably say that Williams had a pre-existing condition, or something else that would've forfeited his claim. Even if they accepted it, they would likely opt for the surgery that would most affordably cure his ailment. That would not be the option he chose; instead, Williams would've had the more prevalent broken sternum option, unless he chose to pay for it out of his own pocket.

      Proponents of privatized health care will say that this is proof that the American system is superior. This is hardly the case, since only the affluent can avail of the system. The large number of people with partial or no coverage would never be able to afford a similar surgery in the United States. Over 60% of American bankruptcies last year were a result of medical bills. and many of those people were insured. You'd be hard-pressed to find a similar figure in canada.

  24. How funny watching you Canadians spin this story. You know if Obamacare was ever passed here in the states, it would be the same: Only the rich would be able to go to the front of the line. Fact………

    • It's also funny watching Americans trying to create a story out of nothing. The sad truth is that the American system only works for the wealthy, leaving the poor by the wayside. Obama is proposing a secondary system for Americans who cannot afford insurance. This is being labeled (or spun) as "socialist" by the Republicans. He is in no way trying to eliminate private health care. As a Canadian, it saddens me to hear stories of people denied coverage by an insurance company whom they have been paying for their whole lives. Neither system is perfect; Canada has long wait times, America refuses patients due to lack of money. Of the two, I prefer the former.

  25. He could have come to London, Ontario, and has his mitral valve repair done robotically. It leaves only a scar of a few inches rather than the cracked breast bone procedure more commonly performed. I had it done that way about seven years ago and I am still doing fine and not taking any maintenance drugs. It was all pretty slick and done right here in Canada.

  26. > The man owns a condo in Florida. Where would you rather recover from heart surgery this time of year

    Agreed. As I check around, it's not yet clear whether of not Williams will be reimbursed by the Canadian system. Despite his claiming not to know or care, maybe the thought he would. Or maybe he didn't do his homework on availability of the procedure in Canada (reportedly it is). Or maybe, surprise, surprise, a politician went on a junket! Conclusions drawn from this anecdote, this one data point, are worthless in judging the merit of either system.

  27. Folks, the bottom line is that one's ability to access timely and quality health care is directly proportional to one's wealth. Thus, one's wealth in our society is the measure of a man. Pretty gauling, as we have plenty of unmonied types who contribute much to the quality of those who live among them, but because they lack deep pockets, they must languish whilst waiting for procedures they desperately need. Let THEM eat cake! What makes Danny's case more gauling is that as premier, he reigns over healthcare in his province. Thus, what he's saying is that he thinks his province's healthcare system works well enough for his subjects; it just doesn't measure up for himself. Now THAT's sick!

  28. It is a very interesting debate health care that is. Well unless everyone starts bickering over it like at my family gatherings boo. I know that in Canada it is available to all citizens but not all services are offered in every providence. Canadians often come down here to the us for specialized services. Its a win/lose in both situations.

  29. I agree it is hypocritical and funny at the same. Time i'd say more ironic that someone of that stature from Canada has to come down to the US for surgery.

  30. Tim i really agree with you. "if Obamacare was ever passed here in the states, it would be the same: Only the rich would be able to go to the front of the line."

  31. a news release from Dec. 3, 2009, announcing that the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine had just published a feature article on the latest techniques for reconstructing the valve, which separates the heart's two chambers so blood flows during a normal beat.

    Very pleased to see the below info.

  32. The thing with heart surgeries these days is that the recovery is so intense. You often need a myriad of vitamins and supplements to help you get on track. Not only are you losing money since you aren't working while recovering, you often spend an arm and a leg on supplements, vitamins, and minerals. I always recommend to shop online for these types of purchases. I like to go to Bodybuilding.com, and I always use these Bodybuilding.com coupons to help save on my purchase. Supplements for my heart and blood pressure are all purchased online using coupon codes and I couldn't be happier and healthier because of it! Gotta love online shopping ;)

  33. Wow that's pretty insane. Way to represent Canada Mr. Premier!

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