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If I were an editorial cartoonist


 

… looking at the spate of recent polls showing massive public hostility to the coalition and all its works, I’d sketch out the following scene for the next day’s paper:

Dion, Layton and Duceppe dressed as US soldiers circa Iraq invasion. They’re about to enter a city, or maybe disembarking from some sort of military transport — anyway, it’s obvious they’re in the first wave. Above them flutters the banner of the Coalition. Just around the corner, however, lurks an angry mob of locals brandishing rifles, bombs, etc., ready to make mincemeat of the unwary threesome.

Dion, oblivious to the impending carnage, is saying to Layton: “Relax, they’ll greet us with flowers.”

Gable, Clement, Aislin: over to you. No charge.


 

If I were an editorial cartoonist

  1. Umm Isn’t that a little silly considering that it was Harper who wanted Canada to participate in George Bush’s destructive war of aggression.

    Dion and the Liberals were totally opposed to that nonsense that Harper so willing and naively fell for.
    I mean talk about an error of judgement that reveals Harper’s character.

    Also, this angry mob… Are you trying to say that Conservative supporters are like radical Islamic militants? Blinded to reason by their ideology. The haters of democracy and everything wholesome.
    ;)

    That’s pretty harsh of you toward the Conservative base.

  2. Why don’t you dialogue with the commenters who make the effort to read your blog, rather than launch yet another propagandistic salvo?

    We get it. You hate the coalition. You don’t want massive fiscal stimuli. You want Canada to wait and see what the Americans do.

    Why not just argue that directly?

  3. By the way, didn’t you call the Iraq invasion a “just war?”

  4. Iraq, that’s the country Stephen Harper wanted us to invade alongside the Americans, right Andrew?

  5. You are a cartoonist Andrew.

  6. Sorry I meant to say: monumental error of judgement (that reveals Harper’s character)

  7. My editorial cartoon:

    Dion and Harper are at a chess board. Harper is on the ropes, most of his pieces lost, possibly with an obvious looming checkmate. Dion is in the process of moving his King into a square where it will be taken by a large number of Harper’s pieces and saying “King me”!

    The different pieces can possibly be different politicians… Flaherty will be visibly to the side, showing that he has been taken.

  8. “Iraq, that’s the country Stephen Harper wanted us to invade alongside the Americans, right Andrew?”

    You sound like one of the same idiots that was offended by the New Yorker cover. Editorial cartoons aren’t meant to be literal – in fact, that this one presents a massive right wing failure in judgment makes its point emphatically to Liberals in particular.

    PS: what do you think Chretien would have done if there was no Quebec election on?

  9. Iraq’s a sore point with Canadians, Hoosier.

  10. So trying to form a democratic coalition is kind of like a failed war that costs trillions of dollars and thousands and thousands of lives. yeah I get it. its pretty much the same.

    PS Do you think Harper would have joined McCain in an attack on Iran if he had been elected

  11. hosertohoosier: ” what do you think Chretien would have done if there was no Quebec election on?”

    Just for the record, that’s not true, the story’s in Eddie Goldenberg’s book: they were thinking long-term, both re: Quebec and re: multilateralism, the latter pushed especially by Paul Heinbecker, our UN Ambassador at the time. Turns out they were 150% right, eh? Not Mr. Coyne’s finest hour.

  12. How about “Mission Accomplished”?

    These guys couldn’t think one move ahead in checkers let alone play chess against a Grand Master.

    Mine’s free too.

  13. Jack: You mean the Chretien government didn’t take into account all the fabricated intelligence and the fact that the Attorney General at the time had concluded that the invasion was illegal?

  14. Just so you know…Mr. Count Ignatieff was a BIG proponant of Iraq war.

  15. You’re turning into a cartoon yourself, Mr. Coyne.

    I know it’s tough being assigned to blog duty on the weekend, but surely you can do better.

  16. Just so you know…Mr. Count Ignatieff was a BIG proponant of Iraq war.

    Yes, but he was an American at the time. He’s since re-discovered Canada, and so…all is good.

  17. In a way the republican misinformation campaign surrounding the Iraq war does bear a ressemblance to the misinformation spread by the Conservative party about our parliamentary democracy.

  18. The Rovian tactics of smear and lie on Iraq

    And the Harper tactics of misleading the public about the constitution and what he has done in Ottawa

    Andrew Coyne: Are you for or against Canadian parliamentary democracy?

    Harper has abused our democracy with regular confidence motions that threaten an election.
    This abuse of power must end.

    As Liberals stood up to the onslought of Republican lies about the Iraq war and weapons of mass destruction, they need to stand against the lies about our democracy and its abuse.

  19. How popular was Bush when he invaded Iraq?

    How popular is he today?

  20. So is screaming separatist, trotting out fake liberals and cooked polls all the Cons have to offer. I have to say I’m less than impressed with the vaunted Con messaging machine.

  21. Wow, quite the Lib-Dip circle jerk going on in here. Don’t you guys have lives? Maybe you could get out of your basements on a Saturday night and and meet a real, live girl. One not named “Rosie”, I mean. (and I’m home because I have a child, meaning I’ve already met a real, live girl. Try it sometime, you’ll be a lot less angry)

  22. Poor child.

  23. In a way the republican misinformation campaign surrounding the Iraq war does bear a ressemblance to the misinformation spread by the Conservative party about our parliamentary democracy.

    It hasn’t been successful though. Their message has gone from, “They can’t do that,” to, “Okay, they can do that but…” I think 2 years of simply forcing legislation through Parliament by terrifying the Liberals instead of arguing their case has made the Conservatives lazy.

  24. yep you win rat.

    why discuss when a smear will do.

  25. Try it sometime, you’ll be a lot less angry

    The evidence suggests otherwise.

  26. My political cartoon: Dion and Layton sitting in a tree with Harper, a snarling bear, climbing up.

    Dion: Negotiate!
    Layton: Shoot it! shoot it now!

  27. If you think we’re angry, you should see Mrs. Rat.

  28. “and I’m home because I have a child, meaning I’ve already met a real, live girl.”

    It always brings a tear to my eye whenever I see evidence of successful coitus

    Mazeltov, Rat. May you have many years of successful boning.

  29. “Andrew Coyne: Are you for or against Canadian parliamentary democracy?

    Harper has abused our democracy with regular confidence motions that threaten an election.
    This abuse of power must end. ”

    Yes, ordinary Canadians have a DUTY to support the coalition because it is purportedly legitimate (actually it is only legitimate if the governor-general things it is), regardless of its merits. If you challenge the coalition you are against Democracy.

    Why exactly are you proving Mr. Coyne’s point for him?

    The governor-general can install the coalition (I do think calling an election is a legitimate option – the public strongly prefers that course, suggesting that new norms of democratization make the King-Byng precedent largely obsolete), and it would be legitimate. That is unqestionable. What is questionable is whether or not we have to like that coalition. What is unquestionable is that we have the right to express why we dislike an alliance of incompetence and separatism – not just in the hopes that our opinions will affect the governor-general’s decision, but also in the hopes that borderline Liberals will swing against the VONC.

    The governor-general shut down parliament – you want to shut down debate, over something that is far more debatable than you admit. If only you could see that you, yes, you, specifically, and the mind-bogglingly empty hive mind you evidently share with Stephane Dion are the precise reason this coalition has ballsed up what was almost a slam dunk. You never sold Canadians the merits of the coalition, you just said you were taking power. Thankfully, the vast majority of Canadians ask more of their leaders than “Harper sucks” as a raison d’etre (apparently the urbane intellectual folk of Toronto and Montreal do not).

  30. I’m glad Coyne is posting more, but apparently we have to pick quantity vs quality

  31. Well, if you want to debate Iraq, isn’t that war pretty much over? A victory for the US led coalition? The only “grim milestones” I’m hearing about these days are happening two-countries-over in Afghanistan.

    Also, there’s some revisionist history going on here regarding Canada’s decision to sit out Iraq. Chretien wasn’t making some principled stand. He essentially said, “We won’t let the US make our decisions for us! We’ll go if the UN authorizes it…”

  32. First, Coyne set the tone here. Don’t blame me.

    Second, The coalition was born of Harper’s repeated practise over the last two years of making routine legislation a matter of confidence. You want to poison the opposition, then go ahead threaten an election all the time. Let’s not forget Harper’s manual distributed to committee chairs on how to obstruct the business of parliament.

    Despite this forced cooperation, Harper called an election to get a majority. He didn’t get it. Now he wants to force another election. He will keep doing this until he gets a majority. Perpetual elections is an abuse of his power. I want to see the elected members of parliament. That’s why I favour a coalition that will provide an economic stimulus and stop the useless election posturing.

    Fourth, polls go up and down. I don’t care if what I am saying is not popular this week. Bush was very popular for awhile spreading untruths. Now he is not. How long until the Harper Conservatives have their Palin.

    Third, You and the rat like to make alot of assumptions about people you disagree with. Is it because I want to see politicians cooperate rather play chicken all the time?

  33. I want a strong economic stimulus. (Harper seems for deficits when he is not against them)

    The economic update says we are in surplus territory, when the parliamentary budget officer says we are in deficit.

    I am from Montreal and I want a strictly enforced gun registry because I live in a big city.

    The GST reduction was poorly thought out. I would have prefered an income tax deduction.

    Flaherty squandered the buffer between surplus and deficit.

    Overall government spending since the Conservatives took power is up. But to appease their base they make a big deal of small potatoes like Arts funding and per-vote subsidies.

    I think the government has not been telling us the truth about Afghanistan.

    And Harper sucks (thanks for reminding me)

  34. Ahh.. if you can’t win an argument.. nit pick!

    The coalition is being slaughtered at the polls. I know lifelong NDPers who are up in arms and attending anti-coalition rallies. Young people (the supposed bastion of the Liberals-NDP) are totally opposed to the coalition (see Facebook largest anti-coalition group: 130 000, largest pro-coalition group: 30 000). Poll after poll shows that Canadians are reacting extremely negatively to the coalition and the thought has sent the Tories skyrocketing up to levels not even seen by Brian Mulroney back when there were only 3 viable parties (not the 5 now).

    The coalition boasts that they are the ‘62% majority’ but so far the support for the coalition is mired in the mid 30s. Meanwhile opposition to it is over 60%.

    Just admit. Your coalition is unpopular and was a mistake.

  35. Is this some (not-so?) subtle self-mockery on AC’s part? I mean, given his cartoon exactly repeats his own mistakes regarding the war? I’m not trying to be cute, I’m serious. I remember his blogging & columns from that time. And he seems too smart & with too good a memory not to be aware of it himself. I’d hate to think he was deep into Ignatieffian reinventionism. Or am I guilty of “misplaced specificity” (pg. 92, Ignatieff’s World)?

  36. Nit pick?

    People are losing their jobs and their savings.

    What will Parliament be doing about this on Monday.

    Nothing.

    Because Harper took the unprecedented step of shutting down our elected House of Commons to avoid facing them. My representative in parliament was sent home.

  37. The coalition is being slaughtered at the polls.

    You Conservatives really do love your violent rhetoric, don’t you?

    You really should start dialling it down. Canadians have had enough of it.

  38. Umm to be fair ti-Guy, I did kindof post that linked video in response to the rats comments.

    Ok enough joky snarkiness. (what has coyne done to me)

    Good night all. And god bless.

  39. Do I believe that 46% of Canadians would truly support Mr. Harper in the event of an election? No I do not. Do I believe that 62% are “angry with the opposition coalition’s attempt to take power from the Conservatives”? I do not. At least not when it’s as simply stated as that. Do I believe that at the particular moment in time those polls were conducted those above-mentioned percentages were willing to say this to a pollster – without any further thought about the consequences of their actions? Yes I do. Why? Because they were pumped up to levels of hyper-emotionality by the Conservative war room and by the inflammatory and divisive language of Mr. Harper and surrogates of his like Pierre Polivere and Dean Del Mastro. I am reminded that at the height of the Meech Lake debacle there were a few polls that indicated that over 60% of Quebecers favoured independence. I believe it even hit a high of 70% in one poll. Do I believe that was a true reflection of Quebec public opinion? No I do not. It was something that occurred in the considerable heat of the moment. It was an aberration. I believe the polls taken over the last couple of days are similar kinds of aberrations.

    I believe we are now facing a moment in our country’s history that is similar to one that occurred shortly before Confederation. The country is polarized between reformers/progressives (i.e. the coalition supporters) and reactionaries (the Conservatives). The only way the reformers can win is by forming an alliance with progressives in Quebec, many of whom have ambivalent feelings about the Canadian nation. Will such an alliance be comfortable? No. Will it necessarily be popular? No. Is it the necessary and right thing to do? Absolutely. Will our leaders – or if you prefer our “elites”- have to lead the way the same as they did during Confederation? Yes. I think they have to until public opinion can catch up with them.

  40. Let me be even more explicit about what I think the stakes are here: I believe that, if handled right, this moment in history is a way to truly engage Quebec once again in the Canadian federation. I also think it is an opportunity for all of the country’s progressive forces, whether they be Liberals, NDP-ers, Greens, soft nationalists, Red Tories, unaligned but progressive-minded Canadians, all of them, all of us –to come together. If handled poorly then I have concerns about our national unity.

    About the West: first of all it is very important to state that public opinion in the West is not any more monolithic than it is in the East. It is nuanced, fluid and complex. There are many Western Canadians who, for instance, vote NDP and Liberal in election after election although usually too few to win individual ridings. That being said it is an undeniable fact that a great deal of Conservative and anti-coalition support is concentrated in Western Canada. Since I have suggested that the Conservatives are reactionary does that then mean I believe that Western Canadians are reactionary? Not at all. Rather, I think it is completely natural that the further away from Quebec one goes the less understanding there would be about terms like “sovereignty” or “soft nationalism”. This lack of understanding does not reflect any kind of intellectual failing on the part of Western Canadians. I think it simply reflects the ignorance – and ignorance’s two bastard children: fear and hatred – that comes more easily with geographic distance. It is important to stress that ignorance, fear and hatred is not any more the property of the West than any other part of the country. You can find it just as easily in Brockville, in Hérouxville, in Peterborough, in Lac-St-Jean, in St. John’s, in Montreal, in Toronto or in Vancouver as you can in Lethbridge or Nanaimo.

  41. I simply think it is much easier to say “Aww let Quebec leave if it wants to. I am tired of their blackmail” or “If this COUP happens then Western Canada needs to separate” if one lives in rural B.C. or Calgary then if one lives in…say New Brunswick or Northern Ontario or Toronto. Especially if one is encouraged to do so by the example of MPs like Dean Del Mastro who shout “traitor” at Liberal and NDP members who dare to enter into a strategic and limited alliance with the (democratically elected) Bloc Québecois. The sort of alliance, by the way, that Harper was only too happy to strike when it was politically expedient for him to do so. I am reminded that Jacques Parizeau became a separatist on a cross-Canada train trip. He was amazed at the sheer geographic immensity of Canada and he concluded that there was no away a country so large could remain united, that its different peoples could never truly understand and appreciate each other. Was he right? I do not believe so, but then I always choose to be optimistic and to give others the benefit of the doubt. I think, in part, that is what it means to be a liberal and a progressive.

    All of this to say: do not believe the polls. Do not let the polls make up your mind for you. Think critically. Think carefully. Think about what is best for this country. I remain fully committed to the coalition and defeating Stephen Harper. I urge you to do so as well.

  42. Andrew, keep enabling our angry disfunctional PMSH. Because we know that when the piper comes to be paid, ie pitching an illegal war, that the media never has to answer for it.

  43. Harper has finally helped define our democracy for us so that we can breathe and stretch from the yolk of ungodly liberalism.
    Now we know that elections must be held on set-election dates (unless its PM Harper’s call); that the government must answer and respond to the will of parliament (unless its PM Harper’s government); that in a minority, government’s must face the possibility and responsibility of non-confidence votes (unless its Harper’s gov’t); that Canadians vote for MPs who compose the will of the people in parliament (unless it goes against Harper’s government, then its a republic); and that opposition parties in a minority have the right to make coalitions to defeat and replace the government (unless, well, you get the picture).
    Thanks Andrew, you’ve helped straighten us out and can prepare for that senate appointment.

  44. Wow, that would in absolutely no way aid and give credence to a campaign of misinformation created by people who should know better, now would it?

  45. Jesus Andrew, the flypaper you put up is sure attracting some ugly ones today.

  46. Jean Proulx writes: Let me be even more explicit about what I think the stakes are here: I believe that, if handled right, this moment in history is a way to truly engage Quebec once again in the Canadian federation. I also think it is an opportunity for all of the country’s progressive forces, whether they be Liberals, NDP-ers, Greens, soft nationalists, Red Tories, unaligned but progressive-minded Canadians, all of them, all of us –to come together.

    You progressives really do love each other don’t you? It’s like the country is just sort of an afterthought.

    Oh, and Woodstock, you might want to lay off the “come together” crap. I don’t think anyone’s used that line since the 1970s university campus riots – and it’s still not back in vogue. Not even in a cheesy, retro-y kind of way.

  47. Hey Ranter,

    You raise a good point. I do think that love is on our side actually. While what we consistently get from Harper and his minions (and I’ll include you in that group if you don’t object…or even if you do object actually) is hatred, fear, intolerance, anger, cynicism and ugliness.

    Your crowd reminds me of the old Orange Order in Ontario or the Chateau Clique in Quebec. Sorry you may need to crack open a history book now. My apologies. The only way the neoconservative movement can be seen as anything “new” is because your ideas (classical liberal economics, social conservativism, a fetishistic love of the military and “strong leaders”) are so ass-backwards and had been soundly rejected so long ago that reviving them now makes it seem as if they are something fresh.

  48. “I believe that, if handled right, this moment in history is a way to truly engage Quebec once again in the Canadian federation.”

    A few of us Conservatives are thinking the same thing. With a Conservative majority and with Jean Charest winning a majority we can now bring Quebec into the constitutional fold with honour and enthusiasm. More autonomy for the provinces? After the federal clown show this week the people will support it. Enter our friend Mario Dumont to sell it to Quebec.

    200-250 seats for the Conservatives is a given at the moment; can they win 300 seats if they bring Quebec into the fold? Time will tell.

    “That being said it is an undeniable fact that a great deal of Conservative and anti-coalition support is concentrated in Western Canada.”

    51 seats in Ontario last election, and that number would climb to 75-80 if an election were held today.

    Every single criticism of Harper and the Conservatives made by his pathological haters is either wholly false or superficial. Every single one. The only valid possible criticism of Harper is his increase in spending, and his enemies are just ticketyboo with that, so they make up pretty much everything else and hope it sticks. It doesn’t.

    “Western Canada” now starts at the Ottawa River, sweetie; this episode didn’t just move the needle, it redrew the map. Liberals are now confined to inner-city gay villages and ungrateful Atlantic provinces.

  49. Ah, you were making a slightly more sophisticated argued PTC until your last sentence about “inner-city gay villages and ungrateful Atlantic provinces” revealed the fear and hatred at the hear of your project. Couldn’t resist could you?

    Only a deeply delusional ideologue would think that Charest, or any Quebec politician, could align themselves with Harper after this week’s disgraceful behavior on his part. And your assessment of Ontario public opinion has been overly influenced by Coyne’s polls which i have already argued are HIGHLY SHADY and should be seen with a great deal of skepticism and critical thought. Finally you risk underestimating how much coalition support there is among Western Canadians. I suspect public opinion is not nearly as monolithic in your backyard as you believe. All the talk about Alberta separation this week must have had a sobering effect on more pragmatic and tolerant people in the West.

  50. Jean, when a completely unelectable Bob Rae needed a seat, where did he run?

    The gayest riding in Canada and possibly the world: Toronto Centre. The rest of Ontario simply would not elect the man who wrecked the Ontario economy, so he found the most radical possible riding, which happens to be the gayest riding.

    Now the gay community will have a hard time disassociating themselves from Rae’s spendthrift legacy. It means the next time a gay politician runs for office the public has a legitimate economic argument to make against that candidate. Gay voters, according to the facts and undeniable data, don’t care about taxes and deficits, they want their gay agenda and they want it now, even if it means electing the most widely reviled Ontario politician to represent them.

    Recent polls show only 7% of gay men support the Conservatives. The percentage of non-gay men who support the Conservatives is over 40%, or about 500% higher. That’s a problem. Mutlibillion dollar bailouts to GM and Ford and bags of cash to Big Union is not a different opinion, it is a wrong opinion, which will cost me and other serious Canadians real money for many years. And 93% of gay men support that wrong opinion, to the great detriment of the 95% of Canadians who aren’t gay. Again, that is a problem.

    Gays have nothing but hatred towards heterosexual activists. They are not endangered porcelain dolls but rather vocal and vicious partisans. As long as Canada remains a free country I will criticize them however I wish, wherever I wish, and whenever I wish, especially when they are acting in concert to bankrupt the federal treasury.

    In the 1950s, Ottawa elected a lesbian mayor. Nobody cared much that she was a lesbian; she was the city controller and was judged on her ability to do the job. Fifty years later, the putative favourite for the mayor’s chair, a gay man named Alex Munter, lost the election quite badly, in large part for the reasons I listed above: his social extremism is impossible to decouple from his fiscal fecundity and at a time where property taxes are skyrocketing the public deemed a gay man to be too risky to put in charge of a $2 billion budget.

    Politicians who are not professionally gay, such as certain members of Harper’s cabinet, and don’t allow their orientation to dictate their politics, seem to have less trouble getting elected, even in socially conservative ridings like Ottawa West-Nepean (lots of seniors there). I argue that by aligning themselves to the radical left, gays have made themselves nearly unelectable and place great strain on their relationship with the straight community, and the data supports me on this point.

  51. Where are these polls you speak about showing only 7% of gay voters are conservative? I am skeptical, because US exit poll data in a country where the right is far less friendly to gays shows very different numbers.

    Gay voters 2000
    Bush: 25
    Gore: 75

    Gay voters 2004
    Bush: 23
    Kerry: 77

    Gay voters 2008 (they went for Hillary over Obama in the primaries)
    McCain: 27
    Obama: 70

  52. Um, that’s a great bunch of unsourced alleged data, hoser. Here are the real numbers:

    Gay community united in stance against PM: poll

    “While gay men tend to vote Liberal and lesbians back the NDP, Canada’s homosexual population is united in its opposition to the Conservatives, according to a new report.

    A study conducted by the Laurier Institute for the Study of Public Opinion and Policy (LISPOP) found just 7.3% of homosexual men and 10.4% of gay women supported the Conservatives in the 2006 election. By comparison, 40.7% of straight men and 32.4% of straight women voted for the Conservatives.

    “Clearly, they are anti-Conservative,” said Barry Kay, a professor at Wilfrid Laurier University and LISPOP researcher. “The hostility there is dramatic … these are numbers that are worse than the NDP gets in much of the country.”

    The report also found that nearly 40% of gay voters cited morality issues such as same-sex marriage as well as abortion as their top concern in the last election, compared with less than 10% of the straight population.

    So, they oppose Harper, and largely due to gay agenda issues, rather than “straight” issues like taxes and the economy, just like I said they did, and in the numbers that I said they did. Don’t shoot the messenger.

    Hoser, you put your finger on it nicely there: in a country less “gay friendly” than Canada the rightwing party (GOP) gets several times the gay vote than do the Conservatives, who are more “gay friendly” than the GOP. Part of it is due to marginal tax rates, I think, but there really is no rhyme or reason to the gay community’s “dramatic hostility”, to use Barry Kay’s words, toward the Conservatives. It’s time it stopped.

    source:
    nationalpost dot com / todays_paper / story.html? id=780579
    James Cowan, National Post Published:
    Wednesday, September 10, 2008

  53. Jean Proulx: “Ah, you were making a slightly more sophisticated argued PTC until your last sentence about “inner-city gay villages and ungrateful Atlantic provinces” revealed the fear and hatred at the hear of your project. Couldn’t resist could you?”

    There is political correctness and then there is what you just said. To dare to type the word gay is now hate? it’s like this idiotic bit we’ve been hearing about Quebec, shhhhhhhh! Don’t call them separatists, they’ll get mad and want to separate. F Them. Big time. You should got to work for the thought police, they’re called the CHRT in case you were wondering.

  54. Andrew,

    keeping it real for Macleans.

    Actually objectively viewing the facts of the last week. All the more impressive given I know you are (were?) a fan of Dion’s.

    Fellow Maclean’s writers here take note: this is the type of professionalism the public expects of its journalists.

  55. At SDA with a link:

    “Related: Dion finally provokes his members to open their wallets. “Card carrying Liberal Party members. incensed at what their Party leadership have pulled, are calling Conservative Party HQ and donating… BIG TIME.””

    To those who think Harper’s “on the ropes” – your ideological blinders apparantly have sealed your eyes shut completely.

    The polls are reflecting what I’ve been saying (no, it wasn’t b.s.) all week. I’ve never seen people from all political stripes so angry. A Liberal friend of mine said he would never vote Liberal again. Another mild mannered friend (who I put between an independent and liberal), wrote an angry letter to the GG telling her NOT to let the coalition govern, but rather call an election so he could “tell the coalition what he really thinks about them!”

    Groups of people – at the gym, buying an x-mas tree, at the coffee shop, would gather (strangers all so they were even outside of their political comfort zone in not knowing if they were offending) spontaineously agreeing that the coalition was political insanity: “stealing government”, “we just voted Harper in” “deal with the devil” were angry phrases used over and over again.

    If anything the polls are under guaging the depth of anger at the coalition.

    By far the biggest political blunder in the history of the Liberal party.

  56. Not bad. What you are saying is that they are expecting a reaction that they definitely arent getting.

    You can ignore one poll but when 3 and even 4 polls are showing essentially the same thing you have a pretty good idea where the public mood is. Regardless, you will be able to tell more from politicians reactions over the next week…MP’s will report back. The only time it will be an issue is if you have a dream palace like Dion’s staff…..reality never seems to intrude.

    I am less certain of Layton’s. I think the reality will work its way up, unlike Dion’s where it wont even be brought forward. Whether Layton will listen is a completely different story, he and Mulcair are currently whipping each other up with their great plan.

    Duceppe, he knows whats going on, and he also sees the threat and opportunity, hence his recent charge that the word “frog” was used. Time for the Quebec equivalent of Rev Sharpton to make his rounds.

    If the polls arent what they appear you will see the tories fall apart, likely offer up Harper as lamb du jour and completely self immolate on the budget, not much different than what happened with Frank Millers tories in 87. Right now, this doesnt look that way….for all the clalls of astrofturfing etc (hard to take from either side) there is a genuine wtf coming from Canadians on this. And the reality is the source of the probelm is two fold

    1) Dion doesnt carry water with most, rightly or wrongly he is 100% discredited
    2) Involving the Bloc was a major major mistake. You can point to other deals, but they would have been rejected just as bad. It was a mistake, remains a mistake.

    Problem for the coalition is incremenetal backing down wont help….there is an argument that you peel each of the offending pieces off to see what happens….same offer with Dion gone, then remove the Bloc. That wont fly in this circumstance, too much improv, too much looking like a “sales job”.

    Wisemen on both sides will recognize the long term issue. While the NDP may not mind Sovereignty Association (which is what this is) they will find that it really doesnt find favour with the electorate.

    That the coalition placed all their chips on a GG initiated transfer, yes it might be constitutional, shows they have misread the public. While Canadians may not like another election so soon, they like being told they can’t vote even less.

    Dion will go first, and if it continues on its current path, Jack will be gone sometime in 2009. With them gone, then people wil start looking at replacing Harper. Not the result that the coalition was seeking.

  57. The only way the neoconservative movement can be seen as anything “new” is because your ideas (classical liberal economics, social conservativism, a fetishistic love of the military and “strong leaders”) are so ass-backwards and had been soundly rejected so long ago that reviving them now makes it seem as if they are something fresh.

    Yet revive them we have!! Woo hoo.

    PTC, do you seriously think that Bob Rae has stigmatized future gay politicians? I find that absurd. Your logic seems to be:

    1. A fiscally retarded politician won a seat in a heavily gay riding.

    2. Therefore, even though said politician is not even gay, he will have tainted the fiscal credentials of all future gay politicians.

    No offense, but that’s just ridiculous. Will voters forever associate gays with shoplifting because of Svend Robinson? Did you even think before posting?

  58. Get a grip Coyne. This polling also finds:

    “55 per cent of respondents think Canada’s on the wrong track, while just 33 per cent think we’re headed in the right direction.

    – 47 per cent of Canadians say Harper “can no longer be trusted to lead the government,” while 51 per cent think he can be trusted

    – 45 per cent blame the Tories for the political crisis
    – 40 per cent blame the opposition”

    I would say there is massive public hostility to Harper and the Conservatives as well. Most Canadians are saying a pox on all their houses, and want the various political parties to sort it out by compromise. Will Harper be able to demonstrate any leadership or ability to compromise, in the coming weeks? That’s the real question.

  59. Ti-guy:

    Like I said.. if you can’t win an argument.. nit pick! Seems to be your favoured course of action.

  60. Speaking of which, southernontarioan, you know it’s “Ontarian,’ right?

  61. The poll numbers are neither a surprise nor a cause for concern for the coalition, because they are driven by very short term factors.

    First, most Canadians are conservative (not Conservative) about their political institutions and their first reaction to anything new on the political scene is knee-jerk rejection. This is clearly the case with Coyne and most other major media commentators. Once the coalition has been around for long enough for people to get used to it, that will die off.

    Second, M. Dion lacks charisma. He will be replaced at the leadership convention in May and the charisma deficiency will be remedied.

    Third, people genuinely do not understand our constitution. A minority government means that NOBODY won the election and that anybody who can get the confidence of a majority of the house gets a shot at governing. Once people get past the erroneous idea that the Conservatives won the last two elections, they will come to accept that there is nothing illegitimate about the coalition,

    Fourth, Canadians generally do not like to be bothered by questions of government between elections. The coalition’s plan to replace the Conservative is bothersome, hence unpopular. After the coalition has been in office for a while, it will be the opposition Conservatives who are bothersome.

    Finally, there is a wide spread notion that the coalition will do a bad job of governing and will pander to Quebec. After the coalition has been in office a while, it will become apparent that this is not true.

    In short, the coalition will take office by the beginning of February and will initially face substantial public hostility. However, by the time Parliament breaks for the summer, most of that hostility will be gone, and by next Christmas the coalition will be the accepted government and nobody will pay any attention to Conservative whining.

  62. …and the land is strong. Ha! Ha! Ha!

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