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Liberals fight scandal—and gear up for carbon confrontation

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Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. On paper, this should have been a great five days for the Trudeau government, but it ended as maybe the worst week so far for the governing Liberals since they took power. They constantly tried to deal with controversies surrounding moving expenses for staff members and a possible extradition treaty with a country that has a dismal human rights record. Maclean’s Ottawa bureau chief John Geddes joins us to break it all down.

The federal government is poised for a showdown this fall with the provinces. The issue is climate change and the problem is a carbon tax. We speak with one of the country’s leading experts on environmental management, who believes the grits may be heading down the wrong path.

We also take a look at the government’s responsibilities when it comes to appointing judges to the Supreme Court.The Liberals face growing criticism from Atlantic provinces as a new selection process starts to play out.

And finally, we’ve crunched the numbers of every word spoken by MPs in the House of Commons since the last election—and we break down the key words and topics that are dominating discussions in Parliament.

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The full episode


Part 1. Liberals caught up in Ottawa scandals

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau's chief advisor Gerald Butts speaks on his phone as Trudeau holds a news conference in North Vancouver, B.C., on Friday May 29, 2015. (Darryl Dyck/CP)

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau’s chief advisor Gerald Butts speaks on his phone as Trudeau holds a news conference in North Vancouver, B.C., on Friday May 29, 2015. (Darryl Dyck/CP)

On paper, this should have been a great five days for the Trudeau government, but it ended as maybe the worst week so far for the governing Liberals since they took power. They constantly tried to deal with controversies surrounding moving expenses for staff members and a possible extradition treaty with a country that has a dismal human rights record. Maclean’s Ottawa bureau chief John Geddes joins us to break it all down.


Part 2. Ottawa gears up for a carbon fight

Pumpjacks at work pumping crude oil near Halkirk, Alta., June 20, 2007. With Canada's premiers poised to meet next week in Quebec City to discuss energy strategy and climate change, forces are girding for battle - with Alberta's oilsands the figurative no-man's land that lies between the warring world views. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Larry MacDougal

Pumpjacks at work pumping crude oil near Halkirk, Alta., June 20, 2007. With Canada’s premiers poised to meet next week in Quebec City to discuss energy strategy and climate change, forces are girding for battle – with Alberta’s oilsands the figurative no-man’s land that lies between the warring world views. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Larry MacDougal

The federal government is poised for a showdown this fall with the provinces. The issue is climate change and the problem is a carbon tax. We speak with one of the country’s leading experts on environmental management, who believes the grits may be heading down the wrong path.


Part 3. Is Atlantic Canada entitled to a Supreme Court judge?

The Supreme Court justices pose for a group photo during the official welcoming ceremony for Supreme Court of Canada Justice Suzanne Cote at the Supreme Court, Tuesday Feb.10, 2015 in Ottawa. Do you want to be a Supreme Court justice? You may have a chance at a seat on the high court if you meet the requirements and criteria to be used in the new selection process. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The Supreme Court justices pose for a group photo during the official welcoming ceremony for Supreme Court of Canada Justice Suzanne Cote at the Supreme Court, Tuesday Feb.10, 2015 in Ottawa. Do you want to be a Supreme Court justice? You may have a chance at a seat on the high court if you meet the requirements and criteria to be used in the new selection process. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

We also take a look at the government’s responsibilities when it comes to appointing judges to the Supreme Court.The Liberals face growing criticism from Atlantic provinces as a new selection process starts to play out.


Part 4. How Parliament debated key issues in 2016

Pages and staff prepare the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Canada, December 2, 2015. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

Pages and staff prepare the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Canada, December 2, 2015. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

We’ve crunched the numbers of every word spoken by MPs in the House of Commons since the last election—and we break down the key words and topics that are dominating discussions in Parliament.


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Liberals fight scandal—and gear up for carbon confrontation

  1. personally…I’m getting a sore rear end from these focks rooting around in there

  2. MacLean’s On The Hill listened to your program for the first time, I would like you to look at something else that does not work in Canada, it is representation by population one that really irritates Canadians, Quebec has 80 seats its population only warrants 40 seats, who fixed this in the first place

  3. Supreme court,??? I thought it was Santa Clause college grad photo.

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