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Maclean’s on the Hill: Brexit, Duffy, CPP and immigration

The Maclean’s Ottawa bureau gives you its weekly podcast on all things #cdnpoli


 

podcast

Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. This week, after a stunning vote, the ‘Leave’ camp won the Brexit referendum—and that means the U.K. has voted to leave the European Union. The news caused turmoil in global markets and prompted Prime Minister David Cameron to announce his intention to step down. What does this mean for Canada’s economy and our pending trade deal with the EU? We speak with Conservative finance critic Lisa Raitt.

The Mike Duffy expense saga isn’t over yet. A Senate committee is demanding the senator repay nearly $17,000 in expenses. That comes just two months after he was acquitted in court. Duffy’s lawyer, Donald Bayne, tells us his client is prepared to take legal action.

The Trudeau government began the week with a major deal with the provinces over retirement savings. They struck an agreement-in-principle to expand the Canada Pension Plan. How will it work? And what will it mean for you? We get answers from economist Kevin Milligan.

Finally, what is triggering much of the anti-immigrant sentiment we’re seeing among disenchanted voter bases around the world? That’s the subject of a new academic study, and we get some of the details from its lead author.

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The full episode



Part 1. What the Brexit vote means for Canada’s economy

British Prime Minister David Cameron turns to walk away as he finishes making a statement appealing for people to vote to remain in the European Union outside 10 Downing Street in London, Tuesday, June 21, 2016. Britain votes whether to stay in the EU in a referendum on Thursday. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

British Prime Minister David Cameron turns to walk away as he finishes making a statement appealing for people to vote to remain in the European Union outside 10 Downing Street in London, Tuesday, June 21, 2016. Britain votes whether to stay in the EU in a referendum on Thursday. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

After a stunning vote, the ‘Leave’ camp won the Brexit referendum—and that means the U.K. has voted to leave the European Union. The news caused turmoil in global markets and prompted Prime Minister David Cameron to announce his intention to step down. What does this mean for Canada’s economy and our pending trade deal with the EU? We speak with Conservative finance critic Lisa Raitt.


Part 2. Mike Duffy refuses to pay back more expenses

Senator Mike Duffy leaves the courthouse after being cleared of bribery and fraud charges in Ottawa, Canada on April 21, 2016. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

Senator Mike Duffy leaves the courthouse after being cleared of bribery and fraud charges in Ottawa, Canada on April 21, 2016. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

The Mike Duffy expense saga isn’t over yet. A Senate committee is demanding the senator repay nearly $17,000 in expenses. That comes just two months after he was acquitted in court. Duffy’s lawyer, Donald Bayne, tells us his client is prepared to take legal action.


Part 3. What does an expanded CPP mean for you?

Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau, centre, is flanked by his provincial and territorial counterparts as he speaks during a news conference after reaching a deal to expand the Canada Pension Plan, in Vancouver, B.C., on Monday June 20, 2016. (Darryl Dyck/CP)

Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau, centre, is flanked by his provincial and territorial counterparts as he speaks during a news conference after reaching a deal to expand the Canada Pension Plan, in Vancouver, B.C., on Monday June 20, 2016. (Darryl Dyck/CP)

The Trudeau government began the week with a major deal with the provinces over retirement savings. They struck an agreement-in-principle to expand the Canada Pension Plan. How will it work? And what will it mean for you? We get answers from economist Kevin Milligan.


Part 4. What is driving anti-immigrant sentiment around the world?

Supporters of anti-immigration right-wing movement PEGIDA (Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the West) take part in in demonstration rally, in reaction to mass assaults on women on New Year's Eve, in Cologne, Germany, January 9, 2016. Wolfgang Rattay / Reuters

Supporters of anti-immigration right-wing movement PEGIDA (Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the West) take part in in demonstration rally, in reaction to mass assaults on women on New Year’s Eve, in Cologne, Germany, January 9, 2016. Wolfgang Rattay / Reuters

What is triggering much of the anti-immigrant sentiment we’re seeing among disenchanted voter bases around the world? That’s the subject of a new academic study, and we get some of the details from its lead author.


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Maclean’s on the Hill: Brexit, Duffy, CPP and immigration

  1. Have fun Mike. When you read the original auditor’s report on which the senate based its adventures and then the arbitrator’s report, one finds more than a little of the ridiculous. In one case they called out a senator for stopping at a hotel when returning home from Ottawa when the roads and highways were closed by the police and her home area was under an evacuation order. In another, they faulted a senator for not taking a direct flight home when none was scheduled – perhaps they should have rented wings. One must also wonder why the questionable accounts of senators Stewart Olsen and LeBreton have never been investigated. One might certainly question whether a senator can hold down a full time job as a cabinet minister or party executive and also be paid as a full time senator: surely senator pay and expenses are meant for senate business and nothing else.

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