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Maclean’s on the Hill: Mike Duffy is not guilty

The Maclean’s Ottawa bureau presents its weekly audio briefing on #cdnpoli


 

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Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. This week, Mike Duffy is not guilty. The P.E.I. senator was acquitted of all 31 charges of fraud, breach of trust, and bribery after a year-long trial. We take a look at the verdict with Nicholas Köhler, who covered every second of the case for Maclean’s, and we also speak with lawyer Michael Spratt about the judge’s criticism of the Crown—and what this all means for for other senators’ ongoing legal battles.

Now that Duffy has been cleared of wrongdoing, he gets to go back to his old job in the Upper Chamber. It may make for an awkward return, since so many of his colleagues turned on him at the height of the scandal. We speak with one Conservative senator who voted to suspend Duffy—and another who defended him from the start.

It was a happy 4/20 for many Canadians. On Wednesday, Health Minister Jane Philpott unveiled the timeline for the government’s plan to legalize marijuana‚ and pledged to introduce legislation next spring. Cormac speaks with Philpott about the announcement.

Finally, Indigenous affairs minister Carolyn Bennett joins Cormac to discuss the suicide crisis in Attawapiskat, and the measures the government is taking to help remote First Nations.

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The full episode


Part 1. Mike Duffy is acquitted.

Senator Mike Duffy leaves the courthouse after being cleared of bribery and fraud charges in Ottawa, Canada, April 21, 2016. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

Senator Mike Duffy leaves the courthouse after being cleared of bribery and fraud charges in Ottawa, Canada, April 21, 2016. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

Mike Duffy is not guilty. The P.E.I. senator was acquitted of all 31 charges of fraud, breach of trust, and bribery after a year-long trial. We take a look at the verdict with Nicholas Köhler, who covered every second of the case for Maclean’s, and we also speak with lawyer Michael Spratt about the judge’s criticism of the Crown—and what this all means for for other senators’ ongoing legal battles.


Part 2. How will the Senate react to Duffy’s return?

The Senate chamber on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday Jan. 13, 2011. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

The Senate chamber on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday Jan. 13, 2011. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

Now that Sen. Mike Duffy has been cleared of wrongdoing, he gets to go back to his old job in the Senate. It may make for an awkward return, since so many of his colleagues turned on him at the height of the scandal. We speak with one Conservative senator who voted to suspend Duffy—and another who defended him from the start.


Part 3. Liberals still plan to legalize pot.

A protester lights a joint during a 4-20 marijuana rally on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, April 20, 2012. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

(Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

It was a happy 4/20 for many Canadians. On Wednesday, Health Minister Jane Philpott unveiled the timeline for the government’s plan to legalize marijuana‚ and pledged to introduce legislation next spring. Cormac Mac Sweeney speaks with Philpott about the announcement.


Part 4. How will the government help Attawapiskat?

The remains of a Canadian flag can be seen flying over a building in Attawapiskat, Ont. on November 29, 2011. The federal government is forcing the troubled Attawapiskat First Nation to pay a private-sector consultant about $1,300 a day to run its finances - even though the government's own assessments say the third-party management system is not cost-effective. (Adrian Wyld/CP)

(Adrian Wyld/CP)

Indigenous affairs minister Carolyn Bennett joins Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the suicide crisis in Attawapiskat, and the measures the government is taking to help remote First Nations.


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Maclean’s on the Hill: Mike Duffy is not guilty

  1. For some reason or other, I can see Eve Adams sitting back putting her feet up with a Rhum(Screech) and Coke with lots of ice, saying in her mind to the people who lampooned her and dragged her name through the mud after leaving the Harper party, “I Told You So”. Good on you Miss Adams, for having the guts and the fortitude to stand up to the biggest Bully(Harper and his PMO) that ever tried to run this country. When Miss Adams left, I thought more would follow, and they would have, but they all figured that Harper would bring them back to power. The people of this country were astute enough to see through a Snake Oil salesman. Now Harpers left over minions are trying to find the right color lipstick to stick on their lips in order to try and take away the smell(Harpers MPs), that has permeated in the conservative party and HOCs for the last 10 years. Good Luck Mike Duffy and Eve Adams on your future endeavors, I honestly believed you people from the start.

    • Like Duffy, Helena Geurgis was person who was hard to like or admire.
      But as I recall her treatment by Stephen Harper and his henchmen was disgraceful; the politics of personal destruction at its most effective, if crude sometimes. Wasn’t she the one whose life was ruined by leaks of salacious material which had little basis in fact?
      As with Duffy the media had little time for the pain inflicted on umpleasant people by the a powerful government which also controlled how easy or hard it was for them to do their jobs. They found it easier to join the pile on.

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