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[Updated] More on the oil industry’s hand in a federal museum’s energy show


 

CBC has an interesting story (from its French service Radio-Canada) on the Imperial Oil Foundation’s involvement in the Canada Science and Technology Museum’s current exhibition “Energy: Power to Choose.”

Last month, here at Maclean’s we published an exclusive related piece, touching on the foundation’s sponsorship of the show, but focusing more on Access to Information documents detailing how the museum courted industry support, and how the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers influenced the museum’s portrayal of the oil sands. Over at Le Devoir, Helene Buzzetti has also done original reporting on this issue.

UPDATE: And, this morning, the Ottawa Citizen wades in with a follow that adds comments from the museum’s former vice-president, confirming what I called “pervasive influence from the energy sector in shaping the exhibition’s content.”


 

[Updated] More on the oil industry’s hand in a federal museum’s energy show

  1. What, no expose’s on how the environmental movement has influenced the museum’s portrayal of the oil sands? *tsk tsk*

  2. Simply put, the plot thickens. A broke Museum that just laidoff 17 employees is desperate for exhibition money.regardless of content

  3. The revelation through “Access to Information”  that the Canada Science and Technology Museum’s staff deny allowing Imperial Oil to alter the “Let’s Talk Energy” exhibition text suggests more than the poor management of scientific content. Attempts to cover up such behaviour undermine the credibility of management and staff and show how all levels of the institution are putting sponsors’ messages above accuracy and objectivity, critical components of an independent educational institution. Sponsorship can have positive results, but when substance is neglected and even transformed to meet perceived ends, such as supporting the development of the oil sands, industrial funding undermines the raison d’être of the  museum and will ultimately lead to the demise of an important centre of learning.
    D.Thiery Ruddel

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