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NATO: Action on the Eastern front


 

The Economist sets a cat among pigeons by touting Radek Sikorski, Poland’s foreign minister, as secretary-general of NATO. He’s a good choice to lead a military alliance between Europe and the United States, because he’s a former defence minister whose government wants to reinforce its commitment to the European Union, and he has impeccable contacts in Washington (here’s his wife). He’s a former journalist, although that was long ago and perhaps it should no longer be held against him. And as far as I can gather, Sikorski is less eager on the question of extending NATO membership to poorly-governed war zones than is Poland’s president, Lech Kaczynski, and at least one of my colleagues here at Maclean’s. The idea is warmly greeted in Warsaw; no word yet how it’s viewed in Berlin and Paris, although with a Chancellor who grew up under communism and a President of the Republic who’s also trying to mend fences between Old and New Europe — when he is not simply trying to run everything himself — anything is possible.

None of the speculation about a new secretary-general for the alliance names any Canadians. Surprise.


 
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NATO: Action on the Eastern front

  1. It is interesting to see how Eastern and Western Europeans react to one another. President of Czech Klaus takes over as President of EU today and Westerners are fit to be tied about it because he sees things differently than the French, Germans and Belgians. I guess support for Sikorski will depend on how clubbable others think he is.

  2. I generally agree with The Economist, but I’m not sure about this one.

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