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Note on infrastructure priorities: simpler roads would be good


 

Finance Minister Jim Flaherty started his budget speech today by describing Canada as “a nation at a crossroads.”  It’s a familiar image—but it grew less so as he went on.

To come to a crossroads, one must generally have been traveling along a road. In this case, oddly, Flaherty tells us we have “passed through steep and rocky terrain” and “much of the territory was uncharted.”

Which sounds more like a pathless wilderness. Indeed, he remarks that “our compass has not failed us” and “the way forward remains challenging.”

But, no—we must be at an intersection after all, because Flaherty next says, “Some would urge us to turn at this crossroads.” And not a simple right or left turn, either. “Experience tells us,” he warns, “that would eventually lead us backward.”

Choosing to turn at the crossroads would lead us backward? Must be a cloverleaf.

“We need to stay on course,” Flaherty advises. “We can see our destination on the horizon.”

But can we get there from here?


 
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Note on infrastructure priorities: simpler roads would be good

  1. “a nation at a crossroads.”

    More like a government stuck on a roundabout.

      • Traditionally called chasing one's tail. I get dizzy just listening to Flaherty. Makes you wonder who they have writing this-I'll be polite- material.

  2. Some would urge us to turn at this crossroads.” And not a simple right or left turn, either. “Experience tells us,” he warns, “that would eventually lead us backward.”

    But the economic good times and surplus are behind us, while the path we've been led down has given us a structural deficit and a plan to get rid of it by (from what I can tell) changing the words to O Canada.

    Seems to me that going backwards may be a better idea.

  3. Maybe it's like one of those SUV commercials where the SUV is shown navigating steep and rocky terrain and then, out of nowhere, a crossroads appears.

  4. This is a cruel attack on Flaherty's disability. I am sure he has struggled his whole life seeing where he is going in crowds, fields of tall grass parking lots etc.

    • His short-sightedness, you mean. His lack of inches is far exceeded by his lack of courage to tackle the problem.

  5. It actually kind of maybe works if you give it some leeway, but its also pretty jarring imagery. If I have to think hard about a way your figures of speech are fitting together, it is not a good presentation.

    • It is a cruel attack against the English language. And they want to revise the national anthem? I'm dreading they're thinking – 'you put your right foot in, you put your left foot in, and you shake it all about' . God help us.

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