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Noticed on the way into work this morning


 

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Sometimes, even after many years, you notice what a pretty city Ottawa can be.


 
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Noticed on the way into work this morning

  1. It looks especially good under eight feet of snow.

    Enjoy.

  2. yes, i always enjoy walking on rideau past parliament… sometimes, hidden in downtown you forget that it exists.

  3. Best city in Canada hands down!

  4. …if you like old people, computer people and government people, Ottawa is the place to be!

  5. Often they’re the same person.

  6. I’m cold just looking at that picture. After 7 years in Ottawa, I’m glad to be gone. (Nice place to visit and all that…)

  7. I used to love cycling down the path along the Rideau and then back up along the canal, particularly in the fall. Ottawa is far too maligned.

  8. Fall is definately Ottawa’s season: the weather is still warm enough to enjoy the outside, the changing leaves get picturesque, and most of the summer tourist rush is gone.

  9. Every time I cross the Corktown footbridge and look down the canal at Chateau Laurier and the Parliament Buildings it’s hard to remember why so many people hate this place.

  10. They don’t hate the place, they hate the symbol.

  11. Fall is definately Ottawa’s season: the weather is still warm enough to enjoy the outside, the changing leaves get picturesque, and most of the summer tourist rush is gone.

    Too bad it lasts like 3 weeks :(

  12. The Confederation Block.
    I’ve always thought that is one of the most unjustly ignored buildings in Ottawa, possibly because I used to work there. It’s off to the west and down the Hill from all the tourist attractions, but when you stop to look at it from that angle, it’s pretty damn impressive. It’s not just that gothic stone architecture, but the sheer bulk of the thing rising up, like a bookend to the Chateau Laurier.
    A large number of MPs have their offices there. The address isn’t as desirable as Centre Block but the offices are larger and there was more of a sense of community among the people who worked there (at least there was a century ago in the 90s).

  13. A national capital _should_ be a showcase, so I don’t begrudge it them for a second, but let us please remember, that it is largely the tax $$ from the rest of Canada flowing into the ‘National Capital Region’ that pays for the parks, monuments, and buildings and pays the salaries of the people paying the municipal taxes.

  14. Paul
    I grew up in Nepean and failed to appreciate Ottawa until I moved back years later. I live in Chelsea, and the drive across the bridges, any of them, is a treat. The view of the Hill over the river is superb. Ottawa has great natural beauty, and the architecture downtown- Parliament, the gallery, the churches, the canal, the museum across the river, are all first rate. Throw in the Gats north of the city, and Ottawa really competes with Quebec and Vancouver for Canada’s most beautiful city.

    Its not Toronto or Montreal (or Halifax or Vancouver or Quebec or Winnipeg or Edmonton) in terms of cultural activity, but if you enjoy the outdoors, Ottawa is unmatched- skiing, skating, hiking, camping, rivers, Gat Park. You could spend a life doing wilderness camping within 2 hours of Ottawa and never sample every great spot.

  15. My favourite parliamentary stroll is still the path behind East Block, which takes you past the Famous Five Suffragettes Who Held Less Progressive Views On Eugenics, with the wrought iron gate, the river, the locks and the Chateau on one side and the prettiest building on the Hill on the other. Best experienced mid-summer during the golden hour. (Provided you don’t get attacked by a starling inside the gates, which totally happened to me a few years ago, on the same day that the PM’s goons threw me out of a Centre Block elevator.)

  16. You were thrown out of an elevator?
    What ever were you doing, Kady?

  17. NOTHING! I swear! I was just trying to get to the cafeteria after QP. I didn’t even realize *why* I was being blocked from entry by a half dozen earpiece-sporting security guys — “Take the next one,” one suggested. “The next one? Is he kidding? It’s an *elevator*.” I remember thinking at the time — until a half second before the doors closed (with me on the other side), when I spotted the PM in the very back of the crowd, staring fixedly in the other direction.

  18. The guards probably read your blog and correctly classified you as a security threat.

  19. PM doesn’t have to wait for the elevator?

  20. My threat level tends to be inversely proportional to my blood sugar, so really, it is in everyone’s interest not to resort to extraordinary measures to keep me from grabbing that all important post-QP datesquare.

  21. I guess the escalators are too far away or otherwise inconvenient.

  22. Or, as is, in fact, the case, frustratingly nonexistent.

  23. I meant the non-moving ones.

  24. Come one, guys! Maybe he sprained his ankle….
    (yeah, I’m grasping at straws)

  25. “non-moving escalators.”

    You in government, Dot? Only three words where one would have done nicely? Please try harder.

    Although you get partial credit for the verbiage in the inevitable French translation, it has a poetic ring to it: escalier roulant non-roulant,

    En roulant ma boule…

  26. “non-moving escalators.”

    You in government, Dot? Only three words where one would have done nicely? Please try harder.

    Although you get partial credit for the verbiage in the inevitable French translation, it has a poetic ring to it: escalier roulant non-roulant,

    En roulant ma boule…

  27. With words so concise, they said it twice.

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