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Reprehensible, but not against the rules


 

While allowing that “all reasonable people would agree that attempting to sow confusion in the minds of voters as to whether or not their Member is about to resign is a reprehensible tactic,” Speaker Scheer has ruled just now that, on technical grounds, the campaign against Irwin Cotler does not constitute a case of privilege.

Mr. Cotler’s interventions in this regard are here, here, here, here and here. Previous coverage here, here and here.

And below, the prepared text of the Speaker’s ruling.

I am now prepared to rule on the question of privilege raised on November 16, 2011 by the hon. Member for Mount Royal (Mr. Cotler) regarding the negative impact an organized telephone campaign survey conducted in his constituency has had on his work and reputation.

I would like to thank the hon. Member for Mount Royal for having raised this important matter, having responded to the comments of other Members and for having provided the Chair with additional material in support of his allegations. The Chair would also like to thank the Government House Leader (Mr. Van Loan), the House Leader of the Official Opposition (Mr. Comartin) and the Members for Richmond—Arthabaska (Mr. Bellavance), Saanich—Gulf Islands (Ms. May), and Humber—St.-Barbe—Baie Verte (Mr. Byrne) for their comments as well as the Member for New Brunswick Southwest (Mr. Williamson) for his interventions.

In presenting his case, the hon. Member for Mount Royal stated that several constituents had contacted him about survey calls they had received from a telephone number identified as Campaign Research Inc., asking if they would support the Conservative Party in the (quote) “impending, if not imminent, by-election” (unquote).

He has also informed the House that similar calls were placed to citizens in the Westmount—Ville-Marie constituency. The hon. Member for Mount Royal stated that this telephone campaign led his constituents and other voters to think that he had deserted his post, and overshadowed his parliamentary work. Noting that the House has the right to the services of its Members free from intimidation, obstruction and interference, he claimed that the confusion created among his electors was damaging his reputation and his credibility.

In the case before us, no one disputes the fact that there is no pending by-election. Yet the hon. Member for Mount Royal explains that he has been put in an ambiguous situation through this telephone campaign. He says: (quote) “Simply put, how am I, or any other member, to effectively represent a constituency if the constituents are led to believe that the member is no longer their elected representative? How can one correct the confusion and prejudicial damage that has been done in the minds of those who may think I am no longer their representative in Parliament or no longer discharging my duties?” (unquote)

To support his argument, the Member cited a ruling of Speaker Bosley, as found on page 4439 of the Debates of May 6, 1985, which states: (quote) “It should go without saying that a Member of Parliament needs to perform his functions effectively and that anything tending to cause confusion as to a Member’s identity creates the possibility of an impediment to the fulfilment of that Member’s functions. Any action which impedes or tends to impede a Member in the discharge of his duties is a breach of privilege.” (unquote)

The Chair finds striking the repeated emphasis that the Member has placed on the importance of this issue not only for himself but for all Members. This point has also been stressed by other Members who intervened. Because of the Chair’s primordial concern for the preservation of the privileges of all Members, this is a matter worthy of serious consideration. As your Speaker, one of my principal responsibilities is to ensure that the rights and privileges of Members are safeguarded – and this is a responsibility I take very seriously.

The Member for New Brunswick Southwest (Mr. Williamson) argues, on the contrary, that the House should not even be seized of this question because (quote) “…it lies outside its authority.” (unquote). He claims that: (quote) “…the conduct of political parties should not be judged by the House or by its members…The best place for this to be judged is among Canadians, not in the House… ” (unquote)

The Chair has no doubt that Canadians are indeed judging this matter, just as they are constantly judging this House by what happens here and what is said here and by the attitude that Members display toward one another.

It does not matter that the resources of the House of Commons itself were not used to carry on this particular campaign. On this point, let me point out that the rights and immunities of individual Members can be breached by a wide range of actions and that such actions are not limited, as has been suggested, to actions taken in the House or actions involving the use of House resources.

At the same time, in listening to the arguments on this question, I have seen that a certain confusion seems to exist with regard to the extent of the powers of the Speaker in dealing with questions of privilege. Several Members have ascribed to the Chair seemingly vast powers that neither I nor my predecessors have ever possessed. The role of the Chair is actually very limited, as the hon. Member for Mount Royal has himself pointed out, citing O’Brien and Bosc at page 145: (quote) “…the issue before the Speaker is not a finding of fact, it is simply whether on first impression the issue that is before the House warrants priority consideration over all other matters, all other orders of the day that are before the House.” (unquote)

In cases where a Member alleges that he has experienced interference in the performance of his parliamentary duties, the Speaker’s task is particularly difficult. As O’Brien and Bosc states at page 111: (quote) “It is impossible to codify all incidents which might be interpreted as matters of obstruction, interference, molestation or intimidation and as such constitute prima facie cases of privilege.” (unquote)

Furthermore, in ruling on questions of privilege of this kind, the Chair is obliged to assess whether or not the Member’s ability to fulfill his parliamentary functions has been undermined. House of Commons Procedure and Practice, second edition, at page 109, notes that my predecessors have stressed the importance of establishing a direct link to parliamentary duties in such cases, stating that: (quote) “…rulings have focused on whether or not the parliamentary functions of the Member were directly involved. While frequently noting that Members raising such matters have legitimate grievances, Speakers have consistently concluded that Members have not been
prevented from carrying out their parliamentary duties.” (unquote)

In the Bosley decision cited by the Member for Mount Royal, the Speaker was confronted with a situation where the former Member of Parliament was identified in a print advertisement as the sitting Member: the very identity of the sitting Member was at issue.

In the case at hand, the Chair is entirely sympathetic to the situation faced by the Member for Mount Royal. There is no doubt that he has been bombarded by telephone calls, e-mails and faxes from concerned and confused constituents. However, the Chair has great difficulty in concluding that the Member has been unable to carry out his parliamentary duties as a result of these tactics. The Member for Mount Royal has been extremely active in the House and in committee. By raising the matter in the House as he has done, the hon. Member has brought attention to a questionable form of voter identification practice and described in detail the negative impact it has had. Indeed, his interventions here in the House on this very question have garnered, as he himself points out, extensive sympathetic coverage in media across the country.

In a ruling delivered on August 12, 1988 (Debates p. 18272), Speaker Fraser stated that: (quote) “Past precedents are highly restrictive … and generally require that clear evidence of obstruction or interference with a Member in the exercise of his or her duty be demonstrated in order to form the basis for a claim of a breach of privilege” (unquote)

Speaker Milliken, in a ruling from February 12, 2009 (Debates pp. 765-6), also stressed this point: (quote) “in adjudicating questions of privilege of this kind, the Speaker
is bound to assess whether or not the member’s ability to fulfill his parliamentary functions effectively has been undermined.” (unquote)

As I considered the Member for Mount Royal’s case, a second ruling by Speaker John Fraser has resonated particularly for me. On May 5, 1987, Speaker Fraser concluded: (quote) “Given all the circumstances in this case, I am sure that the Minister’s capacity to function as a Minister and a Member of this House is in no way impaired. I point out to honourable Members that this is the real issue of privilege, although there are obviously other matters that surround the particular fact in this case … the Chair has to look very carefully at the exact point of privilege.” (unquote)

In today’s case too, the so-called surrounding matters have given me pause. I am sure that all reasonable people would agree that attempting to sow confusion in the minds of voters as to whether or not their Member is about to resign is a reprehensible tactic and that the hon. Member for Mount Royal has a legitimate grievance.

I would hope that his airing of this grievance and the discussions this case has provoked – here in the House and in the media – will lead to two results. On the one hand, managers of legitimate exercises in voter identification should be more careful in the information they disseminate to the people they contact. On the other hand, Canadians contacted this way should be more wary and judge more critically any information presented to them by unsolicited callers.

I can understand how the Member for Mount Royal and others are seeking relief from the climate of cynicism – not to say contempt – about parliamentary institutions and practice that seems to prevail. But I fear that such relief is not within my gift: the Speaker’s powers in these matters are limited, as my predecessors have repeatedly stated.

The words of Mr. Speaker Fraser in a ruling of December 11, 1991 seem particularly apt in these circumstances: (quote) “The Chair can devise no strategy, however aggressive or interventionist, and can imagine no codification, however comprehensive or strict, that will as successfully protect the Canadian parliamentary traditions that we cherish as will each Member’s sense of justice and fair play. Especially at this time of crisis of confidence in our parliamentary institutions, our constituents deserve and will tolerate no less.”(unquote)

Accordingly, after studying the precedents in these matters, I am not able on technical grounds to find that a prima facie case of privilege exists in this case.

I would like once again to thank the hon. Member for Mount Royal for bringing this serious and important matter to the attention of the House and of Canadians.


 

Reprehensible, but not against the rules

  1. The ‘technical grounds’ are that Speaker Scheer is a Con.

    • Em, I am sympathetic to your arguments most of the time, but that’s a bit too much. I’m going to give him the benefit of the doubt for now. 

      • How many chances does he get?

        PS…like your slogan….how do you put one in?

        • Go to disqus and click on edit profile.

          • Thank you, I’ll give it a try.

            On edit….hey neat…thanx again!

          • ….and the walls came down…Timbra, his arms open!

          • @The_New_San_Diego_Dave:disqus 

            Exactly!   Make it so!   LOL

    • No need to comment on things you haven’t bothered to read.

      • Why do you do so then?

        I assumed you had read it, and would therefore understand the comment.

  2. “However, the Chair has great difficulty in concluding that the Member has been unable to carry out his parliamentary duties as a result of these tactics. The Member for Mount Royal has been extremely active in the House and in committee.”

    So it’s fine to attempt to obstruct a member from carrying out his duties as long as the obstruction is unsuccessful?

    • Sort of. I’m reading as if the Speaker basically can’t find a precedent in this matter and seems a bit gun-shy in making a new law. As I like to think it, better to get in trouble for doing something rather than getting in trouble for doing nothing, which is essentially what he has done here. 

      A disappointing ruling. 

      • The more I think about it, the more bizarre this ruling seems. Scheer basically finds that it isn’t a matter of privilege because Cotler wasn’t obstructed to the point where he was unable to carry out his duties.

        So let’s say he was obstructed to the point where he wasn’t able to carry out his duties and be “active in the House and in committee?” How would the issue of privilege arise? Would Peter van Loan raise it for him?

        • I think it’s simply a matter of the Speaker saying “Yes, I agree that it is very dishonourable behaviour, but I don’t have the authority to forbid it.” Saying that Cotler is managing to carry on in his role is just rationalization, as far as I can tell.

          I think Scheer has accepted PVL’s argument that stopping the Conservatives from telling bold-faced lies would impinge on their freedom to practice their kind of politics. Sadly, he is right.

        • I think Scheer has the right finding, sadly.  Because the privilege is to the member, and not to the member’s constituents.  Cotler IS able to do his job for his constituents, whether they are able to realize it or not.

          But maybe he can sue?

  3. I think regardless of the Speaker’s decision, the press coverage coming from this decision (which I agree with the Speaker was largely sympathetic with Mr. Cotler – and rightly so) has rendered this tactic more harmful to the Conservatives than beneficial going forward.  There have been many articles recently comparing Harper to Richard Nixon and his “dirty tricks”, and I don’t think that’s a parallel the Conservatives should be eager to encourage going forward.

    Anyone who has become aware of this issue via the media will no doubt be more skeptical of the call next time the phone rings, saying “I’m calling on behalf of the Conservative Party of Canada…”, and in the end, have the Conservatives not damaged themselves moreso than Irwin Cotler in that regard?

    • I hope so. This really was a disgraceful episode, and I think the Conservatives deserve every bit of the scorn that’s been heaped on them for this. Probably more even.

      And no, my account has not been hacked. :)

    • On the contrary, I expect the Conservatives to ramp up the smears, innuendos and outright slanders by a factor of ten. “Reprehensible but still allowed,” will be taken as a hearty endorsement by these people, folks who recognize no personal moral boundaries at all.

       

      • Oh, I’m not disagreeing that the Tories may view this as a green light to ramp this up, I just think it’d be moronic and ultimately more hurtful to the CPC than the Liberals if they did, given the bad press that would continue to accumulate (universally bad press – I don’t recall even Sun Media defending this one).

        As I said above, there was a narrative beginning to emerge from all the commentary on this beginning to compare Stephen Harper to Richard Nixon, I don’t see how that at all is a message the Tories wish to encourage.

        • Don’t forget that this is the same political party who recently proclaimed their guilty plea on charges of electoral fraud as “a big win.” These people are utterly shameless and they couldn’t care less about the shock and horror that’s expressed by the likes of us. In fact, I think they quite relish it.

          See, for instance, the most recent entry in this thread by Wilson. The story they tell themselves is this: “Even though we are the government party, we are still the persecuted minority and anything we do is justified by the fact that we are persecuted by ‘the elites.”

          You may think this storyline is too much of a stretch even for the most credulous supporter but, you would be wrong. Hardcore Conservatives will swallow anything that they are fed even if they have to unhinge their jaws to get it down.

          • That “persecuted minority” meme echoes the stance adopted by Republican presidential pretenders, almost all of whom are trying to define themselves as “outside the Beltway” candidates who will “take on” Washington. Also, the Harris Cons in Ontario who ridiculously proclaimed (long after assuming office), “We’re not the government, we’re here to fix the government”.

            It defies reality and gets old fast.

  4. It’s reprehensible but nobody can stop them.

    SOP for the Conservative party.

  5. “To support his argument, the Member cited a ruling of Speaker Bosley, as found on page 4439 of the Debates of May 6, 1985, which states: (quote) “It should go without saying that a Member of Parliament needs to perform his functions effectively and that anything tending to cause confusion as to a Member’s identity creates the possibility of an impediment to the fulfilment of that Member’s functions. Any action which impedes or tends to impede a Member in the discharge of his duties is a breach of privilege.” (unquote”

    That seems clear enough. Scheer’s takeaway seems to be that Cotler fought off the impediments to the fulfillment of his duties too well – he was too good at his job ;or the CPC tactics only winged him,but didn’t completely cripple him politically.
    So sorry…come back if it persists or gets worse…my hands are tied don’t you know.

    Anyone know what the repercussions of a finding of breach of privelege might entail?

    • This has some precedent however.. attempted murder vs murder for instance.  Why is the punishment for the former so much less than the latter? “Come back when you can aim better?”

      • Ummm, maybe Cotler might want to check into hospital with a nervous break down next time then?

    • A prorogue?

  6. Also from Scheer’s ruling:

    The words of Mr. Speaker Fraser in a ruling of December 11, 1991 seem particularly apt in these circumstances: (quote) “The Chair can devise no strategy, however aggressive or interventionist, and can imagine no codification, however comprehensive or strict, that will as successfully protect the Canadian parliamentary traditions that we cherish as will each Member’s sense of justice and fair play. Especially at this time of crisis of confidence in our parliamentary institutions, our constituents deserve and will tolerate no less.”(unquote)

    My bolding.

    Not sure how successful this plea actually was in 1991, but I’m not optimistic that it will hold much sway today.

  7. Well, if you can’t play in the big boys arena, go home!

    And on the same day Cotler whines about a poll and the suggestion he might be quitting,
    Old Chretien comes out with dire warnings that Abortion, gay marriage could be next on chopping block,

    Talk about your double standard, eh.
    PMSH has ‘worked’ while standing up to false accusations about his policy AND charactor, from the Liberals and their media, for the last 9 years.

    • Wilson!

      So what I’m hearing you say is, fair is fair: Stephen Harper had to endure the ‘hidden agenda’ rumours for years and no one really raised a fuss about that- borderline slander in other words?

      Okay I think I can give you that. I guess when faced with the choice of grace or revenge, they took the latter? Well, you know as well as I that life is a circle. I suspect your CPC is laying some pretty ugly groundwork for when they’re back in opposition.

      PS- did you know at Disney’s Animal Kingdom the Safari ride features a guy named ‘Wilson’ who warns your safari bus driver via radio about dangers on the road ahead? I always think of that every time I see your post. Read into it what you may….

      PPS- PLEASE PLEASE stop typing ‘PMSH’- makes me think of the um, condition, my betrothed gets ever 28 days that results in me grabbing the kids and heading to the beach for the day.

      • Funny stuff.

        No, not revenge, it’s the stupid game of politics, and yes it’s a turn off no matter which side.
        But really rich for a Liberal to whine that ‘rumors’ amount to making him unable to carry on in his role as MP.
        What, he’s superior to our PM?  He’s untouchable because he’s Irwin Cotler? wuz

        Double standard
        Especially on the same day Chretien pops in to, for the 3975 time, accuse our PM of being the antiChrist.
        that’s the kind of stuff legacy leaders leave to the party hacks like Kinsella to do.

        • Really? This is the first I’d heard from Chretien since the 2008 proroguing and the NDP merger talks. He keeps a pretty low profile as most former PMs do (with the exception of He Who Shall Not Be Named as your side referred to him)

    • Oh, Lordy.  I’m so very saddened to report that Chretien’s letter to us worked.  I’m saddened, not because we reached our goal, I’m happy about that.  No, I’m saddened because I’m terribly afraid we took the Conservative “say anything that will get people to donate” fundraising strategy to heart, and it is paying off.

      A bad day for politics in Canada.

  8. n/m

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