Power to the people

In light of events in British Columbia and Wisconsin, Greg Fingas defends direct democracy initiatives.

The leading example is of course California, whose combination of conflicting citizen initiatives and political gridlock has made it virtually impossible to make reasonable budgetary decisions or carry out any long-term planning. And direct democratic processes shouldn’t serve as the only outlet for citizen involvement between elections. Indeed, both of the above examples could have been avoided if the governments involved had consulted with residents to determine whether their policy choices were even faintly defensible.

But there’s always some risk that a government that believes itself to be four years away from any accountability might push far beyond the limits of reasonable political choice. And some mechanism for citizens to take back our representative authority in case of emergency might work wonders to reduce the danger of overreach in the future.




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Power to the people

  1. ‘A Democracy depends on an informed electorate’

    Unlike the electorate that voted in Proposition 13 in 1978 as an amendment to their state constitution….and now California is so far in debt it can’t see daylight.

  2. Am I reading that right?  Citizen initiatives in California have made it virtually impossible to make reasonable budgetary decisions or carry out any long-term planning, so thank God California uses citizen’s initiatives so extensively??? I’ll have to go read the article now, but those two paragraphs in isolation seem to be saying “Thank God for direct democracy initiatives, like they have in California!  Without them, there’s a risk that California would be solvent and governable”, LOL.

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