The Mulcair era begins

Eric Grenier considers Thomas Mulcair’s mandate. Joanna Smith looks at the potential personnel changes. Mark Kennedy lists ten challenges. The Globe profiles a hard-hitting pragmatist. And Postmedia and the Canadian Press considers the prospects for a bearded politician.

Not since Mackenzie Bowell in 1894 have Canadians had a bearded prime minister, and Bowell managed the feat without actually running for the office. The Conservative senator got the nod when then-prime minister John Thompson suddenly died.

Bowell may not be an inspirational figure for Mulcair. Apart from his dramatic, spadelike facial hair, Bowell’s two-year reign was notable for him being the only prime minister to be forced to resign by members of his own cabinet, which he labelled “a nest of traitors.”




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The Mulcair era begins

  1. I was hoping we could skip the beard nonsense.

    • Beard is important – tells us that Mulcair is sandal wearing dirty hippy at heart and Canadians should vote accordingly. You can’t trust the beardy types, they are left wing kooks.

      • Beards are perfectly normal. Be serious.

      • I’m withholding judgement until CP tells me whether he wears socks with those sandals.

  2. Mulcair`s win is bad news for the Liberals. The one place they had a hope of re-establishing themselves was Quebec and Mulcair`s win will mean most of the loose Quebec seats remain NDP.

    Mulcair`s win is bad news longterm for the NDP. Mulcair will hold Quebec but his regionalism will antagonize traditional NDP strongholds in troc.

    Mulcair`s win is good news for Harper and the Conservatives. His gains in Ont. and the West will include most of the new seats. He could win 200+ seats in 2015.

    • “…. and Mulcair`s win will mean most of the loose Quebec seats remain NDP.”

      I think Mulcair’s win means Que feds and soft nationalists will continue voting NDP, while Que separatists will vote BQ and Libs are nowhere.

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