The quiet cuts - Macleans.ca
 

The quiet cuts

The Health Council’s funding is withdrawn


 

Funding for the Health Council of Canada is being withdrawn. Health policy analysts are unimpressed.

“I don’t think it’s just a signal. I think it’s a bullhorn,” said Dr. Greg Marchildon, Canada Research Chair in public policy and economic history at the University of Regina and former deputy minister of intergovernmental affairs for the Saskatchewan government. “Both health reform and any kind of collaborative federalism are really off the agenda for the Harper government.”

“This is really a shame,” he added. “There are very few mechanisms that we have in this country that allow us to think about the large reform issues and the Health Council was one of them.”

See previously: The quiet cuts


 

The quiet cuts

  1. “Both health reform and any kind of collaborative federalism are really off the agenda for the Harper government.” Obviously. The RepubliCon vision is one where the fittest (read best at economic manipulation of others) survive, and everyone else scrambles for crumbs. The provinces should cooperate only on things like national defense — equalization should die — and anything looking like support for the disadvantaged should be cut.

  2. The “council” was a completely useless organization. Since when do we need a “mechanism” to “allow us to think” about anything? I’m pretty sure that every report they issued came to the same conclusion: more money.

    • “I’m pretty sure that every report they issued came to the same conclusion: more money.”

      You’re “pretty sure” or, more accurately, just carelessly assume without bothering to read any?

      • Go look at their website. It’s a friggin’ blog about the Canadian medical industry.

        • You have a problem with that?

          • No, I don’t have a problem with a blog. I have a problem with a blog requiring millions of dollars in government funding.

  3. If it is such a good idea, I’m sure all the premiers and the Council of the Federation will agree to its continued existence and fund it, since it is in their area of constitutional jurisdiction.

    If the organization actually produced recommendations that the Federal Government insisted the provinces adopt as a condition of health funding, the province would scream foul.