UPDATED: The secret revealed — a happy day


 

Dear reader, there is something we have not been telling you. For weeks now, most reporters on Parliament Hill have known, but not reported, that our friend and colleague, CBC television reporter Melissa Fung, was being held captive by kidnappers in Afghanistan. In order to increase the likelihood of her safe return, we had all agreed to keep Melissa’s kidnapping a secret.

Now we can tell you, because now she is free. The Prime Minister is about to have a news conference. I’ll have more in about an hour.

UPDATE: ITQ has brief details from the Prime Minister’s press conference. I’ll have video up inside a half hour. The CBC will hold its own news conference at 3:30 p.m. Eastern.

The prime minister’s answers on questions regarding ransom seem, to my untotored ear, to have been categorical: he says there was none. He left other questions unanswered, sometimes for obvious security reasons and at other times because there probably is no knowable answer.

More soon.

UPDATE: John Cruickshank, the CBC “publisher,” just finished a news conference. Much relief, few new details. Cruickshank, too, says there was no ransom. He emphasized that Melissa was on her second tour in Afghanistan. The trip to Kabul, with a fixer but no military escort, will be debated endlessly by assignment editors. (Every reporter in Afghanistan has a big decision to make, every day they’re there: stay with soldiers, accept their protection along with their extremely limited freedom of movement, in exchange for a better understanding of their task and its limitations — or go out, alone and essentially unprotected, to get closer to ordinary Afghans? There is never a right answer. The tension between the two paths is constant.)

UPDATE: here’s the video.


 
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UPDATED: The secret revealed — a happy day

  1. Less is more when it comes to reporting this type of problem. Hope she is OK!

  2. This is a great strategy. Kidnapping is used as a tool to gain news exposure, world headlines, let the kidnapper’s demands be known, etc. By denying them a soapbox to proclaim their views, the likelihood of another kidnapping diminishes.

    Forgive me for being cynical, but why doesn’t the media do this for all kidnappings, and not only for their fellow media colleagues? Do they care more for their fellow journalists and care less for everyone else? Again, forgive me for my bluntness…

  3. I hope this incident will cause the Canadian media to reconsider the role they’ve adopted as mouthpiece for the Taliban.

    Just as this kidnapping was not reported, there is no reason that the Canadian media should be reporting on Taliban “demands” that Canadian soldiers withdraw from Afghanistan. For our media to give them the soap box that they want for their propaganda campaign in general, but to withdraw their soap box only when one of their own is threatened saddens me. They are an enemy of Canada, and it’s high time that the Canadian media remember that.

  4. You stay classy, John G. BTW, not that it matters, but she wasn’t being held by Taliban members – her captors were “unaffiliated bandits”, according to CBC. But don’t let that stop you from smearing the integrity and judgment of journalists like Melissa Fung who willingly risk their lives to keep all of us informed on the situation in Afghanistan.

  5. Did the decision to NOT reveal this kidnapping of a CBC journalist, which occurred on October 12th have anything to do with the fact that there was an election on October 14th?

  6. The possibility that this news could affect the election had never occurred to me or been mentioned by my colleagues during our conversations as recently as last night, Brent. I found out about Melissa’s kidnapping several days after the election.

  7. I wonder, re: Brent’s comment just how such news would have affected the election, if at all.

    My own perspective is that for every voter who’d look at such news and say “Afghanistan is a complete mess, we should leave there now” there’d be another equally sincere voter saying “Afghanistan is a complete mess, we can’t leave there now“.

  8. Kady, I think you may have misunderstand my point, so let me be clearer…I’m not talking about or objecting to Melissa’s, or any other journalist’s, presence in Afghanistan, and I’m gratified that she’s OK.

    I’m talking about the media (like I often see in the Globe and Mail) who regularly quote “a Taliban spokesman” when reporting on whatever bit of propaganda the Taliban want Canadians to be told. I’m talking about those media who never seem to be able to report on the successes of the mission, like getting schools opened, but perk up only when there is a Canadian soldier dead or injured.

    Our media have been too friendly with the Taliban, and I’m not talking about the ones on the ground; I’m talking about those who make the editorial decisions back home. Hope that clarifies things.

  9. Great news. Gotta admire the courage of these reporters. When she’s recovered, she should write a piece for Maclean’s about the ordeal!

    Incidentally, since the country seems to be awash in unaffiliated bandits, couldn’t news organisations spring for a few tribal bodyguards for their reporters, Great Game-style? They can’t cost that much, I’d have thought — though of course it would be limited protection at best, and I guess you’d have to hope your own unaffiliated bandits weren’t in league with other unaffiliated bandits.

  10. john g, why is it an either-or thing on reporting what the Taliban says vs. coverage of our troops? I don’t see how it can hurt to hear what the Taliban is saying. Canadians surely know enough to take Taliban statements with a bucket of salt.

    In terms of the lack of coverage, Harper’s government has a lot to answer for. They know (or suppose) that the public isn’t keen on Afghanistan, and my understanding was that they had a policy of discouraging close coverage. I have found Graeme Smith’s reporting a bit anti-war, though, I must say.

  11. Glad she is ok, a good ending is always good.

    Have to tip my cap, some of the chances journalist take to infom the public of issue’s like war, just blows my mind.

    Good day for the Candian media.

  12. Lord Kitchener observed:

    “I wonder, re: Brent’s comment just how such news would have affected the election, if at all.

    My own perspective is that for every voter who’d look at such news and say “Afghanistan is a complete mess, we should leave there now” there’d be another equally sincere voter saying “Afghanistan is a complete mess, we can’t leave there now“.

    Two Points:

    (1) Whether it would have or would have not affected the election isn’t the point. The point is simply that I find it strange this information was withheld from the Canadian public, given there was an election in progress. That said, the holding of US hostages by Iran had an enormous impact on the 1980 US Presidential election involving Reagan and Carter……and ultimately the revelation of the Arms for Hostages that brought about their release.

    (2) I guess the days between October 12 (the day of the kidnapping) and October 14 (voting day) were being overwhelmed by far more important events of the media’s (not so self righteous) creation , namely CTV reneging on their promise not to air the out takes of the interview with Dion???

    The media in Canada has little to be proud of, in manipulating events to bring about some body else’s desired outcome. What other news is not being reported on by Canada’s media in real time? This is a form of censorship. I consider in unacceptable.

  13. I wouldn’t have expected this thread to bring out the wacko-comments. Thank goodness she is OK, and I am impressed that the media did the right thing in keeping it quiet, it must have been a tough decision.

  14. john g
    Nov 8, 2008 16:00

    I hope this incident will cause the Canadian media to reconsider the role they’ve adopted as mouthpiece for the Taliban.

    ****

    grow up.

  15. Brent Fullard: “The media in Canada has little to be proud of, in manipulating events to bring about some body else’s desired outcome. What other news is not being reported on by Canada’s media in real time? This is a form of censorship. I consider in unacceptable.”

    Dude, we are talking about a fellow Canadian’s life.

  16. “Incidentally, since the country seems to be awash in unaffiliated bandits, couldn’t news organisations spring for a few tribal bodyguards for their reporters, Great Game-style? They can’t cost that much, I’d have thought — though of course it would be limited protection at best, and I guess you’d have to hope your own unaffiliated bandits weren’t in league with other unaffiliated bandits.”

    Answered your own question with your last thought — might be more trouble than it’s worth, or actually invite trouble where none yet exists.

  17. John D stated:

    “I wouldn’t have expected this thread to bring out the wacko-comments. Thank goodness she is OK, and I am impressed that the media did the right thing in keeping it quiet, it must have been a tough decision.”

    Two points:

    (1) Wacko comments? I guess that pretty much confirms John D’s pro-censorship mindset?

    (2) Tough decision by the media? Made by whom? The same media moguls who attempted to bar Elizabeth May from the leader’s debate?

    The media in Canada is quite pathetic indeed, with only limited exceptions.

  18. Ben – right. And I guess having Western mercenary bodyguards with M16’s would sort of defeat the purpose of interacting with the population to get the straight story. All the more reason to admire reporters like Melissa Fung. The Canadian Association of Journalists should do something to acknowledge her courage, before and after — a moving example to the whole country.

  19. Jack Mitchell said: “Dude, we are talking about a fellow Canadian’s life”

    Correct. That point is not lost on me.

    Meanwhile I am questioning the reasons for why we are only learning about this now, and not when it happened.

    Dude, we are talking about fellow Canadians’ need to know……in real time.

    Since when did it become the Canadian media’s protocol to keep kidnappings secret? What else about this kidnapping and Melissa Fung’s successful release are we possibly not going to be told?

  20. Well, here’s a few things we don’t and needn’t know:

    a) what route the next Canadian patrol is going to take out of our Kandahar base

    b) where President Karzai goes to get his regular Wednesday beard-trim

    c) where JTF2 is

    d) how desperate we are to have a kidnapped person’s life saved.

    In all cases it’s because this gives the people we’re at war with a distinct operational advantage, to be paid for in Canadian and allied lives. On the other side of the scale we have mere curiosity (“need to know . . . in real time” or whatever). In the case of Ms. Fung, the reasoning probably was that if we were seen to be moving heaven & earth then the kidnappers might do something irrational and unexpected, like killing her. Isn’t that fairly obvious? I’m sure there’s a good deal we don’t (yet) know about this, but then again I don’t know the launch codes to Russia’s nuclear arsenal either and, in the end, I can live with it.

  21. This is a good day for Canada. Seriously, how petty does one have to be to take this as an opportunity to smear the media? Melissa Fung is alive and free, after putting her life on the line in service to our country. Growing. F@cking. Up.

    Brent Fullard: before you go pondering about whether this hurt your electoral chances in Whitby — don’t bother. The good people in your riding knew a shameless coward when they seen one and voted accordingly.

    John G: some things are bigger than partisan nonesense. Here’s hoping that from now on, you will use your better judgement.

  22. I am questioning the reasons for why we are only learning about this now, and not when it happened.

    Brent, you answered your own question above: Because someone’s life was at stake.

    It took a lot of discipline for the media not to report this story. Any reporter could have “broken” the story and had a scoop, but they didn’t. The media deserves a lot of credit for this.

    My question is: Will this become a general trend in the media? Will the media abstain from reporting all kidnappings, in the interest of the kidnappee’s lives? (follow-up question: Is ‘kidnappee’ a real word?)

  23. Brian said:

    “shameless coward”

    Huh?

  24. It is great news that she is safe(r, is she still in Afghanistan?), we owe Melissa Fung and other journos that go over, including you PW, an amazing debt of gratitude, to put themselves at a great risk to as the rest of us can better understand what is happening there. Highest regards Melissa.

    The In addition to PW’s post-tour recount, this walrus article is worth a read:

    http://www.walrusmagazine.com/articles/2007.02-media-embedded-reporter/

  25. Brent Fullard:

    shameless (SHAE-M-LESS adjective) – unable to feel disgraced about one’s actions.
    coward (COW-ERD adjective.) – to thwart all courage or bravery

    Taken together they mean: someone who, after comparing Harper and the Conservative government to Hitler and a band of Nazis on multiple occassions – decides to apologize only after these outrageous and insensitive remarks might hurt his own chances at running as a Liberal candidate.

  26. I don’t mean to be too much of a smart-ass, and I am certainly happy she has been returned safely, but I have a question, Paul: If she hadn’t been a journalist — say she was an MP — and if the government had requested that you keep news of the kidnapping quiet in order to increase the chances of her safe return, would the media have respected this request? Maybe an MP is too public a figure to keep it quiet. What about an aid worker? Or a Canadian soldier?

    I ask this more as a journalistic ethics thought experiment than as an indictment of how the media handled this case. And for what it’s worth, I doubt the election had anything to do with this.

  27. Oh, there are so, so many things we don’t know and probably will never know.

    We could go into a Rumsfeldian riff about what is knowable and unknowable but let’s not.

    In any case, my life will be the same if I don’t know that Yusef and Omar got an all expenses paid vacation to Sharm-el-Sheikh or whatever. The lady is safe.

    Two points I do have:-

    – The CBC dropped the contracts of two very experienced war zone correspondents recently.
    Would they have made the same decision that Ms. Fung did ?

    – I can live without the Mother Corp huffing and puffing about corporate and journalistic resolve and
    responsibility blah blah. They’ve spent the past twenty years cowering in the corner like a kicked
    puppy and scuttling out at budget time to kiss gummint butt. Sadly, best of a bad bunch.

  28. Brent Fullard said “The media in Canada has little to be proud of, in manipulating events to bring about some body else’s desired outcome”

    I’d hate to take you out of context here Brent (like so many other times you’ve run your mouth), but you do realize that in this case — the “somebody” was a Canadian citizen and the “desired outcome” was her release from kidnappers.

    For that, everyone should be proud.

  29. Brian:

    Shameless coward indeed. No doubt you are fully informed about the circumstances under which I called Stephen Harper’s conduct into question in emails. The apology you reference was something that I was asked to make by groups who were offended, when in fact it was the interests of groups like them I had most in mind when questioning the conduct of Stephen Harper who:

    (1) Wanted to ban women from wearing burkas while voting, Read: religious and ethnic discrimination and designed to marginalize such people in our democracy, (when it is permisable to vote by mail?)

    (2) The CPC, In the name of “Community Outreach” profiles voters in all ridings of Canada on the basis of their race, religion and ethnicity.

    What do you suppose the intent is begin these actions of Stephen Harper?

    BTW: Whose interest have you come to the defense of recently? Careful, some shameless coward might brand you a shameless coward.

  30. CTV’s double standard

    On Dion interview out takes:

    “We decided that it was important that CTV News not hide anything during an election campaign,” said Robert Hurst, president of CTV News.

    On the kidnapping of CBC reporter Mellissa Fung (from Canadian Press article):

    “Other Canadian reporters in Afghanistan learned of the Oct. 12 kidnapping shortly after it happened. Hours later, journalists travelling on the prime minister’s election campaign also heard about it.

    But both the CBC and the Prime Minister’s Office asked Canadian news organizations to hold off reporting the story, saying any publicity would jeopardize chances of a safe and speedy resolution of the kidnapping.

    The CBC contacted international news organizations, including The Associated Press and Reuters, and asked them to not report on it.”

  31. OK, perhaps I’m not fully understanding why the CBC thought a media embargo would help secure Melissa Fung’s release but…why did the CBC, while in the middle of their requested embargo over Melissa Fung’s abduction, run this story???

  32. John G said:

    “why did the CBC, while in the middle of their requested embargo over Melissa Fung’s abduction, run this story???” (re abduction of French foreign aid worker on November 2, 2008)

    Brilliant contradiction indeed. Good sleuthing John G !

    Now we are getting somewhere with the contradictory dynamics that are possibly at play here. Any credibility now to the thesis that Canada’s election had anything to do with the CBC’s decision not to report? The PMO? CTV? etc etc.

  33. I don’t think it’s wise to assume that every kidnapping situation in Afghanistan (or anywhere else, for that matter) is identical, and should be treated in the same way by the media. There is no indication that the CBC – or, more accurately, the AP, which seems to have broken the story above – did so against the wishes of the government, or the aid organization involved — in fact, they even provided some details to the media on what had apparently happened . I suspect that the decision on how much – if any – information to release publicly is made on a case by case basis.

  34. “CTV’s double standard.”

    You really do have a knack for mind-boggling comparisons, Mr. Fullard. So let me make one: if memory serves, at least one reporter knew of Ken Taylor’s scheme to get the Americans out of Tehran in 1979 and didn’t report on it, because it would plainly have been the wrong thing to do, because lives were at stake, and because the need for/right of the public to know could easily be satisfied after the fact. In this case, whether or not it played a role in the decision, a direct request not to report was made. What the hell, exactly, is your problem?

  35. Brent Fullard asked “Whose interest have you come to the defense of recently?”

    Well, Brent…I come in defense of rational discourse – something that seems to have eluded you in your tireless crusade to demonize your opponents as the self-appointed “CEO” of a dubious lobby group, created to present an illusion of broad public opposition in a common cause , when really it’s just you — Brent Fullard — armed with a conspiracy theory decoder ring and a glass of half-empty kool-aid.

    I also come in defense of empathy. On a day when a Canadian journalist is freed from her foreign captors after risking her life in our service, you impugn the the motives of the people who worked for her release with thinly-veiled accusations and by drawing incoherent lines of moral relativity between a botched Stephane Dion interview and the media’s decision to protect the safety of a fellow Canadian. Imagine for a second that Melissa Fung was a friend or family member — would you really be complaining about the process or the media’s role that ultimately led to her freedom? )Or would you just be glad she’s safe?

    Mr. Fullard, with your hyper-partisan attacks and utter lack of sensitivity, you are the personification of what is wrong with the Liberal Party right now. There was no second shooter and this isn’t a grassy knoll – a woman is free and she’s coming home to her family.

  36. Brent Fullard asked “Whose interest have you come to the defense of recently?”

    Brian basically said: “Nobudy’s”

  37. Macleans said:

    Dear reader, there is something we have not been telling you. For weeks now, most reporters on Parliament Hill have known, but not reported, that our friend and colleague, CBC television reporter Melissa Fung, was being held captive by kidnappers in Afghanistan. In order to increase the likelihood of her safe return, we had all agreed to keep Melissa’s kidnapping a secret.

    John G said:

    OK, perhaps I’m not fully understanding why the CBC thought a media embargo would help secure Melissa Fung’s release but…why did the CBC, while in the middle of their requested embargo over Melissa Fung’s abduction, run this story???

    French aid worker abducted in Kabul
    Last Updated: Monday, November 3, 2008
    CBC News

    An Afghan bystander was killed on Monday when he tried to intervene as gunmen abducted a French aid worker on a residential street in Kabul.

    One aid worker managed to escape after three assailants in a red Toyota blocked the road in front of the small van containing two French citizens, said neighbourhood police Cmdr. Mohammad Daud Amin.

    A local resident who attempted to prevent the abduction was killed in the attack, Amin told the Associated Press.

    Mohammad Shafi, who witnessed the attack, said the man who intervened lived in a house across from where the kidnapping occurred.

    “He grabbed the machine gun of one of the kidnappers, who opened fire, burning his hand. After that the kidnapper shot him three times in the chest,” Shafi said.

    Some authorities have also reported the man who died was an employee of the country’s intelligence agency.

    Etienne Gille, president of French aid group AFRANE, said the man who escaped is a member of his staff.

    “The car was blocked by another car that was driving the wrong way” from which “an armed man emerged,” Gille said.

    Gille declined to provide the abducted aid worker’s organization but said he was in 30s, a French national and had been in the country for about a week. He added he believed it was the man’s first time in Afghanistan.

    The man’s family has been informed, Gille said.

    The French Foreign Ministry confirmed Monday a French aid worker had been kidnapped and that a crisis centre had been set up and was in contact with Afghan authorities.

    Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid said Taliban militants were not involved in the kidnapping.

  38. Brent:

    As an indefatigable advocate for the rights of income trust investors, I bow to you sir, comfortable in the knowledge that you never lost a single penny when Mr. Flaherty announced his decision to tax income trusts.

    Most probably, it was your humanitarian nature and life-long dedication to seniors that drove you to establish a new lobby group and appointed yourself CEO of the “The Canadian Association of Income Trust Investors”. In your former life, as head of Equity Capital Markets for BMO — you probably never advised a single client that they should invest in income trusts. Surely, a man in your position would have advised his clients about the direct relationship between risk and reward and moreover, that the lucrative tax-free status of income trusts probably wouldn’t last forever and so your clients probably shouldn’t put all their eggs in one basket.

    Clearly, donations of both time and money to numerous charities cannot hold a candle to an esteemed philanthropist like yourself: a man who never lost a penny personally or on behalf of his clients but went on to found an advocacy group for those who did.

  39. Chris Selley said:

    You really do have a knack for mind-boggling comparisons, Mr. Fullard. So let me make one: if memory serves, at least one reporter knew of Ken Taylor’s scheme to get the Americans out of Tehran in 1979 and didn’t report on it, because it would plainly have been the wrong thing to do, because lives were at stake, and because the need for/right of the public to know could easily be satisfied after the fact. In this case, whether or not it played a role in the decision, a direct request not to report was made. What the hell, exactly, is your problem?

    Response:

    Actually the “mind boggling comparison” is yours.

    What exactly is the comparison between (1) the absolute need for security (and concerning information NOT KNOWN by the media) when Ken Taylor kept US diplomats in hiding to prevent their being taken hostage, with (2) disclosing knowledge on the part of the media about someone who has actually been taken hostage? As for the event your are citing, the US personel who had actually been taken hostage was information that was NOT being withheld from the public. Therefore, your analogy proves nothing indeed, except your ability at “mind boggling comparisons”.

    Just to be clear, Melissa Fung’s situation is analogous to the hostages that had been taken (and reported on) and not analogous to the persons under Ken Taylor’s care (and not reported on) and who were not hostages.

    Re: “What the hell, exactly, is your problem?”

    I have a problem with the media withholding information under certain situations, but not under other circumstances and find it highly disingenuous when the head of CTV New is stating on November 2, 2008 that “We decided that it was important that CTV News not hide anything during an election campaign,” when in fact we learn that his news organization was a party to doing that very thing on October 12, 2008 during an election?

    The circumstance isn’t the issue here (ie Dion’s interview), but rather the integrity of the media. When the head of CTV News says “not hide anything”, I assume he truly means “mot hide anything”. Evidently I am wrong. Kind of reminds me of when CTV News lied to me to provide a politician with “cover”.

    And by the way, since when has it been the media standard to not report kidnappings? If that’s the standard, then it needs fo be adhered to uniformly and not selectively. Principles not applied consistently aren’t principles, but merely excuses.

  40. Hey that’s very admirable. Try to remember that spirit when it’s not one of your own facing a similar circumstance. I wonder that it was reported as a ‘secret’ let out now.
    That is more than a little freaky. It’s like using Melissa’s Fungs experience to prop up the ‘transparency’ of the media which noone believes in. Doing that, makes you wonder if she was even kidnapped at all.

  41. Brian

    Your command of the facts is truly pathetic as you conjure up stories that support your own fantasies. Where do I start? I have dealt with your earlier claim of “shameless coward”. Meanwhile, I was not a broker. I never advised a single person to buy a single security. As for the earlier statement of yours about CAITI being some phantom organization, that too is nonsense. Please see our list of members at caiti,info. I could go on rebutting more of your nonsense, but won’t.

    Concerning your “grassy knoll” comment, it is you who believes in conspiracy theories if you believe Harper’s nonsense of tax leakage. if Harper is so confident about his tax leakage argument, then why the 18 pages of blacked out documents? Is that his idea of “transparency and accountability”. Meanwhile 2.5 million Canadians lost $35 billion of their life savings.

    My general disregard and suspicion about the media is borne out of my experience with them on the income trust issue. The Canadian media are corporately controlled and have proven themselves to be corporately influenced in their reporting. Truly pathetic. I am now disheartened to learn that the CBC may also be subject to similar outside pressures, in this case, political pressures.

  42. Truemuse, what the heck is wrong with you?
    A woman is k i d n a p p ed, and suddenly, its a mass-media conspiracy to make hte media seem transparent?
    Perhaps everyone who is using this incident to complain about the media should shut their yaps and thank ‘whatever gods there be’ that Melissa Fung is alright.

  43. Wow! I came on here expecting a bunch of bipartisan good-naturedness, only to find Brent Fullard getting his ass handed to him by Brian. This is way better!

    Its like a hockey game broke out, and Fullard is the Leafs. Brian 4, Brent 0.

  44. I don’t actually know exactly what happened to Melissa Fung so it’s a little early to empathize, isn’t it? This “We have a secret we can tell you now” is just …..echh…
    The press always has secrets, they are treating the public like idiots. I’m right to be critical.

  45. Brent Fullard, you make me ashamed to call myself Liberal. I was offended by CTV’s decision to run the Dion interview, but never in my wildest dreams would I even consider comparing that to what this girl must have gone through and the media’s admirable decision to put her safety ahead of a good story.
    For shame.

  46. You know, Truemuse, I have a vague idea that being kidnapped my Afghani militants can’t exactly be.. fun.
    In this case, I think an individual’s safety trumps the public’s need to hear a good story.

  47. We in the masses can enjoy the ignorance of the last few weeks and the relief of this news. I would like to think the media would be trusted to keep a secret if a non-reporter’s safety required it. I wish I could have complete faith that this would be the case.

    I hope that Ms. Fung did not suffer (any worse than the hell of captivity and the uncertainty of her fate) at the hands of the scum who kidnapped her. And whether she did or not, I would sleep just fine (not) knowing the JTF2 went medieval in Kabul. Ain’t nothing wrong with letting the message circulate among that crowd of filth that if you touch innocent Canadians, the JTF2 can keep a secret about how uncomfortable your last few hours on earth were.

    I sincerely hope there was no reward (i.e. ransom) for these creeps. As much as no ransom may have meant a worse fate for Ms. Fung, there is everything wrong with letting the message circulate that kidnapping innocent Canadians is harvesting a decent cash crop.

    Complete concurrence with Jack Mitchell’s list (above) of no-need-to-knows.

  48. So…we can expect similar discretion from you and your colleagues on, say, national security issues, right?

    In the future, every journalist will surely weigh the consequences of publishing sensitive information, and decide that it’s not necessary to disclose something that could get innocent Canadians killed, just for the sake of a headline, right?

    Right?

  49. What a mess. Comments closed on this thread.