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This is the week that was


 

Paul Dewar, a man of faithlaunched his bid for the NDP leadership. Martin Singh joined the race too. Peter Julian decided to stay out. Brian Topp stated his cases for supporting the arts and taxing the rich. Team Mulcair and Team Topp took shape.

Peter MacKay wasn’t involved in the decision to launch an independent review of the Afghan mission. The NDP questioned the Prime Minister’s control and the government insisted on a separation of public and private business. David Johnston celebrated one year at Rideau. PEI, Manitoba and Ontario voted for their incumbents. The Harper government worked towards an office of religious freedom. The Liberals called for a national strategy on suicide prevention and the House came together to consider the challenge.

The long-gun registry six survived. Peter Penashue kept quiet. The mayor of Huntsville learned a valuable lesson. The bill on flag-flying contained a loophole. The Harper government spent $10.5 million on news conferences, employed a pair of puppet MPs and tabled a 642-page budget bill. Tony Clement skipped a conference on freedom of information. The Prime Minister stood behind on Mr. Clement’s gazebos and public toilets. Michael Chong kept on pushing for QP reform. The experts kept pushing back against the Conservative approach to Senate reform. Committee investigations were blocked. And the government’s ministers accidentally articulated two different positions on Omar Khadr.

Stephen Gordon questioned the NDP’s grasp of economic reality. Chris Selley blamed Stephane Dion for the ill repute of coalition governance. Duff Conacher defended the per-vote subsidy. Glen McGregor noted the record of the man for whom the new RCMP headquarters is now named. Nate Silver measured the impact of campaign advertising. Lorne Sossin considered the legal ramifications of the G8 Legacy Fund. Jack Layton argued for idealism. And Peter Milliken looked back.


 

This is the week that was

  1. pssst aaron:   jack layton died

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