‘To seize and to master our future’

by Aaron Wherry

The prepared text of the Prime Minister’s remarks in Davos today.

“Thank you Professor Schwab for that kind introduction, I also want to thank you particularly for the invitation to speak here that you extended to me earlier this year.  But more than that, Professor, you have made the World Economic Forum an indispensable part of the global conversation among leaders in politics, business, and civil society.  And in the face of continuing global economic instability, the opportunity this gathering provides is now more valuable than ever.  So I know everyone here joins me in thanking you for, in service of the common good, your vision and your leadership.

“My Greetings to Ambassador Santi; to the Governor General of the Bank of Canada, known internationally as Chair of the Financial Stability Board, Mark Carney; to our hard-working Minister of International Trade, Ed Fast; and to the best finance minister on the planet, Jim Flaherty.  And let me just say that I’m especially proud to see so many outstanding Canadian business leaders making their presence felt here in Davos.

“Ladies and gentlemen, I will use my time today to highlight Canada’s economic strengths and to frame the choices we face as we work to secure long-term prosperity for our citizens in a difficult global environment that is likely to remain so.

“As you know, Canada has economically outperformed most industrialized countries during these recent difficult years for the global economy.

“Forbes magazine ranks Canada as the best place on the planet for businesses to grow and create jobs.  The OECD and the IMF predict our economy will again be among the leaders of the industrialized world over the next two years.

“And, one more cherished accolade, of course, is that for the fourth year in a row, this body, the World Economic Forum, says our banks are the soundest in the world.

“These evaluations are the result of sound fundamentals.  Among G-7 countries, Canada has the lowest overall tax rate on new business investment.  Our net debt-to-GDP ratio remains the lowest in the G-7 – and by far.

“And, while we remain concerned about the number of Canadians who are still out of work, Canada is one of only two G-7 countries to have recouped all of the jobs lost during the global recession.

“Indeed, more Canadians are now working, than before the downturn.  How was this achieved?

“Faced with the worst global economic crisis since the 1930s, our Government implemented some of the most extensive and targeted economic stimulus measures of the G-20.

“We made historic investments in infrastructure. We encouraged businesses to invest and helped them to avoid layoffs.  We put substantial funding into skills training, and we extended support for workers who lost their jobs.

“These things we did on a timely, targeted and temporary basis.  We did not create permanent new programs or government bureaucracy.  As a consequence, our deficit is now falling, our debt-GDP ratio has already peaked and we do not need to raise taxes.  I should add that we also did not reduce immigration or give in to protectionism.

“Instead, we have maintained the high levels of immigration that our ageing labour force of the future will require. We have continued to pursue new trade agreements.

“And we have taken action to make Canada, among G-20 countries, the first tariff-free zone for manufacturers.  We have pursued these policies, Ladies and gentlemen, because our number-one priority as a government is prosperity, that is, economic growth and job creation.

“Now, that may sound obvious, almost clichéd.  But is it really?  As I look around the world, as I look particularly at developed countries, I ask whether the creation of economic growth, and therefore jobs, really is the number-one policy priority everywhere?

“Or is it the case, that in the developed world too many of us have, in fact, become complacent about our prosperity, taking our wealth as a given, assuming it is somehow the natural order of things, leaving us instead to focus primarily on our services and entitlements?

“Is it a coincidence that as the veil falls an the financial crisis, it reveals beneath it, not just too much bank debt, but too much sovereign debt, too much general willingness to have standards and benefits beyond our ability or even willingness to pay for them?

“I don’t know.  But what I do know is this.  First, that the wealth of western economies is no more inevitable than the poverty of emerging ones, and that the wealth we enjoy today has been based on – and only on – the good, growth-oriented policies, the right, often tough choices and the hard work done in the past.

“And second, that regardless of what direction other western nations may choose, under our Government, Canada will make the transformations necessary to sustain economic growth, job creation and prosperity now and for the next generation.

“That further means two things: making better economic choices now and preparing ourselves now for the demographic pressures the Canadian economy faces.

“On what we must do now, first, we will, of course, continue to keep tax rates down.  That is central to our Government’s economic vision.  But we will do more, much more.  In the months to come our Government will undertake major transformations to position Canada for growth over the next generation.

“For example, we will continue to make the key investments in science and technology necessary to sustain a modern competitive economy.  But we believe that Canada’s less than optimal results for those investments is a significant problem for our country.

“We have recently received a report on this – the Jenkins Report – and we will soon act on the problems the report identifies.

“We will continue to advance our trade linkages.  We will pass agreements signed, particularly in our own hemisphere, and we will work to conclude major deals beyond it.

“We expect to complete negotiations on a Canada-EU free trade agreement this year.  We will work to complete negotiations on a free trade agreement with India in 2013.  And we will begin entry talks with the Trans-Pacific Partnership, while also pursuing other avenues to advance our trade with Asia.  Of course, I will again be making an official visit to China very shortly.

“We will also continue working with the Obama administration to implement our joint ‘Beyond the Border’ initiative – our plan to strengthen and deepen our economic and security links to our most important partner.

“However, at the same time, we will make it a national priority to ensure we have the capacity to export our energy products beyond the United States and specifically to Asia.  In this regard, we will soon take action to ensure that major energy and mining projects are not subject to unnecessary regulatory delays – that is, delay merely for the sake of delay.

“This complements work we are already doing, and that we will move forward on, with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business to cut the burden of red tape on entrepreneurs.

“We will also undertake significant reform of our immigration system.  We will ensure that, while we respect our humanitarian obligations and family reunification objectives, we make our economic and labour force needs the central goal of our immigration efforts in the future.

“As I said earlier, one of the backdrops for my concerns is Canada’s ageing population.  If not addressed promptly this has the capacity to undermine Canada’s economic position, and for that matter, that of all western nations, well beyond the current economic crises.

“Immigration does help us address that and will even more so in the future.  Our demographics also constitute a threat to the social programs and services that Canadians cherish.  For this reason, we will be taking measures in the coming months, not just to return to a balanced budget in the medium term, but also to ensure the sustainability of our social programs and fiscal position over the next generation.

“We have already taken steps to limit the growth of our health care spending over that period.  We must do the same for our retirement income system.  Fortunately, the centerpiece of that system, the Canada Pension Plan, is fully funded, actuarially sound and does not need to be changed.  For those elements of the system that are not funded, we will make the changes necessary to ensure sustainability for the next generation while not affecting current recipients.

“Let me summarize by saying, ladies and gentlemen, that, notwithstanding Canada’s many advantages, we remain very concerned about the continuing instability of the global economy of which we are a part. The problems afflicting Europe, and for that matter, the United States, are not only challenging today but, in my judgement, threaten to be even greater problems in the future.

“Having said that, each nation has a choice to make.  Western nations, in particular, face a choice of whether to create the conditions for growth and prosperity, or to risk long-term economic decline.  In every decision, or failure, to decide we are choosing our future right now.

“And, as we all know, both from the global crises of the past few years and from past experience in our own countries, easy choices now mean fewer choices later.

“Canada’s choice will be, with clarity and urgency, to seize and to master our future, to be a model of confidence, growth, and prosperity in the 21st century.

“Thank you, ladies and gentlemen, for your kind attention.”




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‘To seize and to master our future’

  1. I suppose Steve’s supporter will praise this speech as visionary and demonstrating strong leadership.

    His usual detractors (like myself) will throw our usual Harper hater bombs his way.

    So rather than do that I will try just make some random comments:

    I would have to see the delivery but it reads like an okay speech.  However, there does remain that small-town Chamber of Commerce feel at the beginning, “to our hard-working Minister of International Trade, Ed Fast; and to the best finance minister on the planet, Jim Flaherty.  And let me just say that I’m especially proud to see so many outstanding Canadian business leaders making their presence felt here in Davos.”

    He is still all about rewriting history: “And, one more cherished accolade, of course, is that for the fourth year in a row, this body, the World Economic Forum, says our banks are the soundest in the world.”

    Of course he railed against the regulations that have kept our banking system strong while he was in Opposition or out of politics.  It was Paul Martin who turned down the bank mergers and kept those same regulations in place.

    “Faced with the worst global economic crisis since the 1930s, our Government implemented some of the most extensive and targeted economic stimulus measures of the G-20.”

    Yeah, investments “extensively targeted” at Tony Clement’s riding.

    Let us also not forget that any stimulus that there was only came about after Steve’s mind was severely concentrated in the face of a political hanging.

    “We have already taken steps to limit the growth of our health care spending over that period.” i.e. – Suck it provinces

    “We must do the same for our retirement income system.  Fortunately, the centerpiece of that system, the Canada Pension Plan, is fully funded, actuarially sound and does not need to be changed.” 
    Another rewrite of history.  It was Paul Martin who put in place the measure to make the CPP sound.

    I’ll see Steve’s “Canada’s choice will be, with clarity and urgency, to seize and to master our future, to be a model of confidence, growth, and prosperity in the 21st century.”

    And raise him one Harold MacMillan, “Events, dear boy, events.”

  2. Wow! I wonder how that bragfest went down over there right now?

     ”In this regard, we will soon take action to ensure that major energy and mining projects are not subject to unnecessary regulatory delays – that is, delay merely for the sake of delay”

    …and as to what what actually constitutes delay he will of course be the decider. 

    Guess it’s game on for radical enviros and any Aboriginals that can’t clamber on board the Harper express to prosperity…all aboard!

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/inside-politics-blog/2012/01/post-6.html

    He could try taking Tom’s advise. Maybe there is a good reason Harper froze him out after all?

  3. CPP actuarial analysis is sound? It’s predicting a 4% investment growth rate for the foreseeable future, and within its own report states that “If short-term improvements in life expectancies continue, especially for ages 75-89, the long term assumptions will need to be adjusted accordingly. This will put additional pressure on the minimum contribution rate that could cause the rate to increase above 9.9%”

    So to be sound, we have to have a long term 4% investment growth rate based mostly around government bonds.  That may have been reasonable 1993-2007 or so, but these days? 

    Then on top of that, we have to assume that there will be no significant enhancements in life-extending technologies as the baby boomers start getting older and realize they can’t take it with them. Anybody wanna lay odds on *that* one?

    • You think he’s going to allow life extending technologies? 

  4. “To seize and to master [my Kingdom of Harperland]”

    Pompous ideological grandstander, could not trust a single syllable that comes out of his mouth.

    • Oh, you can most certainly trust every word that comes out of his mouth. What he actually means we only see in hindsight.

  5. “Yes, it would probably be nice if the Prime Minister visited more often. There’s a great big building here in downtown Ottawa that was actually, literally, built so that people would have some place to make important speeches that were meant to be heard. That said, I’m not sure he actually said what he was going to do today. Just that it was going to be HUGELY MASSIVE TRANSFORMATIVE”

    I thought AW’s response was pretty witty…was there just a hint of sarcasm there, mockery even?

  6. 7 comments, and they all hate Harper.  I see Wherryland continues to be a hotbed of diversity of opinion.

    • Wherryland is totally diverse.  There are left-leaning types who hate Harper and all conservatives, centrists who hate Harper and strongly dislike most conservatives, and even a few who veer over to the extreme right in that they vote against Harper but don’t actually wish to see him dismembered.

    • You’re welcome to leave if you don’t like it.
      Or even add something if you’re capable of it.

      Just whining about it though? That’s pretty sad.

      • In case you hadn’t noticed, Orson Bean has been contributing excellent comments to these boards for quite some time now.  

        • A while ago, he was. Lately he just seems to be whining about how they aren’t all balanced.. Perhaps he expect Macleans to bus in some CPC supporters?

        • I certainly don’t disagree that Orson is frequently an excellent contributor to the comment sections at Macleans, but this is hardly a shining example of that.  The whole “Harper hater” thing gets a bit tiresome at times, imho.

          And Thwim’s comment above in particular doesn’t even mention Harper, but simply questions the viability of CPP economic forecasts.  How does that comment display a hatred of Stephen Harper?

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