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We’ve covered Justin Trudeau all his life. Here’s his story.

Canada has always kept its eye on the Trudeau family


 
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at a press conference at Rideau Hall after being sworn in as Canada's 23rd Prime Minister in Ottawa, Ontario, November 4, 2015. (GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images)

(GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images)

Canadians have watched Justin Trudeau grow up within the pages of Maclean’s. We followed his earliest days as a prime minister’s son, his emergence as a national figure, and eventually his own arrival as Prime Minister. Trudeau spent years dropping hints about his political ambition to Maclean’s writers. We’ve covered Trudeau all his life. Here’s his story.


He was first to learn of his dad’s first retirement.

Peter Bregg/Canadian Press

(Peter Bregg/Canadian Press)

The press reported that Pierre Elliott Trudeau told his three sons, including Justin, about his 1979 retirement from politics before he told their mother, Margaret. (The retirement wouldn’t last.)


He eulogized his father in front of the country.

PJ/JP

(PJ/JP)

Millions of Canadians who weren’t acquainted with Pierre’s eldest son watched him eulogize the elder Trudeau in 2000. That emotional tribute launched the first of countless rumours that Justin would run for office.


His career in politics became “when,” not “if.”

(Ryan Remiorz/CP)

It was during an interview with Maclean’s writer Jonathon Gatehouse in 2002 that Trudeau first declared his intention to, some day at least, run for office.


His career in politics became all but official.

Justin Trudeau and wife at his Liberal nomination meeting in Montreal. April 2007

A couple of Maclean’s reporters who’d skulked around the Liberal leadership convention in 2006 first heard Trudeau hint, over the phone, that he’d run for Parliament in the next election.


He won a seat in Parliament.

(Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

(Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

After Trudeau took the hard road to the House of Commons, knocking off a strong Bloc Quebecois incumbent in Montreal’s Papineau riding in the 2008 election, he explained his new job to Maclean’s reporter Aaron Wherry.


He taught us a thing or two about boxing.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

Before he fought Sen. Patrick Brazeau in a rowdy hotel ballroom in Ottawa’s east end, Trudeau correctly predicted exactly how the match would go down during a conversation with Maclean’s Ottawa bureau chief John Geddes.


He ran for Liberal leader.

Justin Trudeau at    The federal Liberal Party Leadership "Showcase" event at the Toronto Convention Centre April 6, 2013

Ten years after “if” became “when,” Trudeau and Gatehouse sat down two days before the Liberal MP announced his intention to run for Liberal leader. His victory foreshadowed his 2015 election strategy.


He had a plan to run the country.

Paul Wells in conversation with Justin Trudeau.

As Trudeau wrapped up a busy summer in 2014, Maclean’s political editor Paul Wells quizzed him on every issue under the sun.


He beat the man who detested Pierre’s legacy.

Justin Trudeau, Canada's prime minister-elect and leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, and his wife Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau wave to supporters on election night in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015. Trudeau's Liberal Party swept into office with a surprise majority, ousting Prime Minister Stephen Harper and capping the biggest comeback election victory in Canadian history. (Kevin Van Paassen/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

(Kevin Van Paassen/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

Three years after the technical knockout that unofficially launched his bid for the Liberal leadership, Trudeau soundly beat Stephen Harper’s Conservatives—and ended nine-plus years of Tory rule.


He was our biggest newsmaker of 2015.

Prime Minister Trudeau speaks with Katie Telford in his Centre Block Office. November 5, 2015. (Adam Scotti/Prime Minister's Office)

(Adam Scotti/Prime Minister’s Office)

For all that, we named Trudeau the Maclean’s Newsmaker of the Year for 2015.

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