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What Omar Khadr says about you


 

Chris Selley considers.

The fact that Harper gets away with it so easily—like Paul Martin and Jean Chrétien before him—is proof that most Canadians don’t actually care about child soldiers. They care about anonymous child soldiers with anonymous victims. Faced with a fellow citizen who suffered the same basic scenario they so abhor in Africa, many of us—the Prime Minister among them—rule out mercy as a matter of principle. Of the many insights into the national character Omar Khadr’s case has provided, this is easily the most perplexing.


 

What Omar Khadr says about you

  1. Selley asserts:

    The reaction to this extraordinary sound byte—or more accurately, the lack of reaction—is proof of how much of a non-issue Omar Khadr remains among the majority of Canadians and in the majority of the Canadian media.

    Lack of reaction? Can Selley actually read?

  2. Sort of like how Canadians care about the environment? Anyway, Canadians elected Harper twice and our largest province elected Mike Harris twice, so don’t get all mushy about how caring we are. The shoe doesn’t fit. But, under a reasonably wise and just leader, Canadians can come off looking fairly good.

    • It makes me yearn for one.

  3. This has been my point all along: Canadians have not risen as one to Care About Omar Khadr. My theory is that it’s because most people see him as an unsympathetic passport-of-convenience-holding parasite at best, and a loathesome murderer at worst – and have consciously (or not) decided that if it’s possible to passive-aggressively leave him to whatever fate the latter brings him, that’s acceptable.

    But, by all means, keep shouting that I’m a disgusting bigot for suggesting that this might be the case.

    • Your theory is that most Canadians have the exact same opinion as you! How about that.

      • Conversely, your theory is that most Canadians have the exact same opinion as you? Neat.

        It’s a theory. It seems to be borne out by the evidence we have available – i.e., the total lack of public enthusiasm for the outrage re: Khadr attempted to be ginned up by pundits like Wherry. How about that?

        • Conversely, your theory is that most Canadians have the exact same opinion as you?

          No, “rumor” didn’t make any claim about what Canadians think. You did.

          You may not be a bigot, but what you most definitely are is stupid.

          • Yeah, I think I can deal with Ti-Guy thinking I’m stupid. It’s not really the crushing putdown you imagine.

    • At least one other Canadian sees it that way.

      But also, even if I liked the guy, there is no Canadian or international law that dictates we should be doing anything to bring him back. The law is the law. If we had such a law, then so be it.

      The law would be something like: “if you travel to a foreign country to wage war, and you and up a prisoner of war because you were involved in a battle that killed a soldier, then you should get a free ticket to a third country of which you happen to hold a passport, because you were a few years short of 18.”

      “Said third-party country should stand up for your human right to kill or attempt to kill soldiers liberating a country from a fascist oppressive government. Because you are not yet 18. And if you are not yet 18, then people should stand up for your right to wage war and kill people, at the behest of nobody but your own family. We all know that 15 year olds do exactly what their parents tell them. and any normal 15 year old would kill someone if you asked him the right way.”

      Wherry has been trying to argue there is some sort of principle involved, when in reality he just has a soft spot for killers and terrorists, and there is no principle involved whatsoever.

      • when in reality he just has a soft spot for killers and terrorists,

        I really wish Macleans</i. would crack down on defamation and libel. Cretins like sf don’t deserve any public space.

        • pot/kettle

      • Oh, I just love “third country of which you happen to hold a passport”. That’s classic.

        Further proof that to conservatives, a Canadian passport (even that of a natural-born citizen born in Ontario) is essentially meaningless. He’s not a citizen, he’s just some guy who happens to have been born in our country, and happens to hold a Canadian passport.

        By this logic, the Americans could jail any one of us without trial for over 7 years, and as long as the crime they accused us of was serious enough, and they maintained the thinnest pretense of eventually moving toward sometime of tribunal (even if said tribunal were considered inadequate by the U.S. Supreme Court) the Canadian government would apparently be under no obligation whatsoever to do anything about it.

        It’s not just guilty until proven innocent. It’s not just that Khadr is imprisoned without trial. It seems Khadr’s not even entitled to diplomatic intervention until he’s proven innocent.

        And we’re the only liberal democracy on Earth to take this stance. Britain, Australia, Germany etc… No one else has even allowed their country’s ADULT citizens to be kept in Gitmo. No matter what they were accused of.

        When it comes to protecting the rights of Canadians overseas, the Tories take the narrowest view of “protection” possible. UNPRECENDENTEDLY narrow.

        It makes on positively nervous about ever travelling outside of our borders.

  4. Speaking of leadership, I heard Jay Hill yesterday of the Braaawdcast. In his non-response to Don Newman’s query as to why Obama was coming to Canada when Parliament wasn’t sitting, he chirped, twittered and finally gushed that “Obama can visit anytime he wants!”

    We don’t need more leadership. We need to fewer idiots in charge.

    • I don’t know Ti-guy idiots we have with us always, in charge or not, as the case may be. Leadership now is a rare and precious thing. Not perfection, just strong moral leadership. Obama’s already had an impact merely by changng the tone. I don’t mean to sound too moralistic

      • $@#&@
        but a strong moral leader can do a lot to persuade and cajole an indiferent or apathetic populace to simply do the right thing, even against their better instincts. Although consistently applying the law would be a start. A leader should lead, not follow.

        • Because we all know that the right thing is exactly what you say it, no matter what most other Canadians think.

          • sf
            Not at all. If we had an open and honest debate among Canadians and they still gave him the thumbs down, well that would be that. You also presume to know what Canadian’s think, i hav’n’t been convinced that’s what we really want. If SH is convinced that we shouldn’t do anything, then he should as our leader try to convince those of us who disagree, not simply pander to red meat cons like you.

          • You’re saying he should convince people why nothing will continue to happen? It’s not the government’s job to be moralizing. He’s not a preacher or an evangelist. If he were to take a course of action, then perhaps he should say something, but I don’t believe I’ve ever seen someone call a press conference to notify people that nothing will happen.

            I’m just responding to your claim that the issue is settled and it’s a matter of the leader doing something about it. I think the leader is perfectly happy, and as wherry and selley have noticed, Canadians don’t need convincinv because they already agree with him.

          • sf
            Agreed the PM doesn’t have to moralize. What he does have to do is coherently argue a case for not retuning Khadr as per our international obligations and our own laws, not simply pander to his base. Now you’re claiming to know what Canadian’s think. Obviously a significant number of us diagree with the Pm’s position [ what are the # right now/ ] If he has a different moral or idealogical position then defend it publicly. Not hide behind some bs about Khadr not being a child soldier because he wasn’t in an army, which isn’t even relevant in law. Or simply dump it all in Obama’s lap. In my view he fails as a leader either way.

      • Obama’s already had an impact merely by changng the tone.

        Too early to tell. Wait four years.

          • I thought the whole issue was that we cannot wait four hours (four years?!!) for Khadr’s freedom.

      • Yes, Obama has had such an incredible impact. Khadr remains in Afghanistan, while Obama shut down the tribunals and replaced them with nothing. The changes are breathtaking.

        I guess Obama was too busy campaigning to have come up with alternative course of action… oh wait a minute, that’s what campaigning is all about, isn’t it? Hmmm … I’m sure he will have a solution in no time, like perhaps moving the prison from Guantanamo to Hawaii.

        • Sorry, typo, Khadr remains in Guantanamo.

          • No correction necessary. We know what you meant.

  5. Child soldiers generally sad because they are forced to fight. Omar Khadr chose, volunteered, to fight and kill. Having made that choice, it isn’t clear to me why he shouldn’t be held responsible.

    • You know these things to be facts? How? Were you there with him, witnessing the whole thing? You were there with him, witnessing the whole thing! What were you doing in Afghanistan with Omar Khadr while there was a war going on? Surely not anything you should have been doing! You must be a terrorist! TERRORIST! Somebody arrest and torture this person, immediately!

      • Irony, sarcasm, logic nothing seems to penetrate the self-righteous, judgemental aura these guys have. They know… well…because they know. It’s a simple trick once you’ve mastered it!

    • John—you are right—Canadians are right—when Ti and kc call you a red meat con and other insult of the day that means they are wrong and cannot come up with a logical argument.

      Selley and Wherry now know you are right. This is not a difficult moral question. Those that make it so either have too much time on their hands. are misguided or dishonest.

      A Canadian along with other family members chose to go to Afghanistan and try to kill Canadians and our allies. He was captured by the Americans. He is in jail. We sleep good at night because that is where we think he belongs.

      • Ti and kc call you a red meat con and other insult of the day that means they are wrong and cannot come up with a logical argument.

        I never called anyone a “red meat con.”

        Why do right wingers lie all the time? Is it their nature?

        • Sorry——that was one of the other guy`s insults—–yours was ” stupid ” —my mistake.

          • That wasn’t an insult. It was a statement of fact.

          • What’s wrong with calling a con a” red meat con”, William? I would have thought, under the right circumstances, it could be deemed a complement. I imagine sf will ask for an aplology, if he wants one.

  6. To me, the most important point Selley makes is his little parenthetical digression.

    IF we want to assert the whole child soldier thing…

    THEN why isn’t / aren’t the low-life scum who indoctrinated this angel into becoming a child soldier being tried and jailed? If Omar’s mama wants him out of Cuba and back home in Canada, she should turn herself in, testify that she brainwashed him into sending him over there to wage jihad, succeeded in doing exactly that, regrets that he wasn’t able to kill more infidels, regrets that he did not martyr himself to the glory of Allah, plead guilty and then rot in prison for whatever third-of-a-sentence our corrections systems metes out?

    Jailing this bit– um, this wit– um, this lady while we try to rehabilitate a young man is a trade I would happily make.

    • Canadians like Madeyoulook make me sick…ill enough to vomit non-stop. They have no understanding of rules of law or evidence.

      What mama propagandised MYL is also a question worth asking, no?

      • Actually you are wrong again—Myl almost always makes sense—well-thought out arguments—some I agree with, some I don`t , but always intelligent.
        , You, on the other hand, Now I don`t like to insult but you were the first to say vomit.

        • *shh* William. Sane people talking.

        • I appreciate the compliment, William. But, actually, in re-reading my “THEN” sentence I see a large number of grammatical atrocities. I really must calm down the mouseclick-happy finger.

          • I really must calm down the mouseclick-happy finger.

            I knew it. Nuts.

    • MYL
      Why aren’t the alcoholic parents of many kids on reserves in jail; why aren’t the parents of the drug dealers on our streets punished apropriately? A little selective aren’t you? ” If we were all treated according to our deserts, who shall escape a whipping?” Hamlet. [ para]

      • kc, please allow for the possibility that there is a difference between being a miserable parent and being a criminal enticing your progeny to join your criminal venture.

        It is illegal to force your child to be a drug dealer in your enterprise. It is illegal to force children to become child soldiers. It is not illegal to be a useless drunk good-for-nothing parent of a child who, through no active prodding of your own, becomes a young offender or child soldier.

        • You’re saying it’s illegal to force yr child to become a child soldier. It certainly should be a law, but i’m pretty sure it isn’t. If so, why no charge? I’m glad to see you don’t automatically condemn a 15yr old boy.

      • Why aren’t the alcoholic parents of many kids on reserves in jail; why aren’t the parents of the drug dealers on our streets punished apropriately?

        I’m pretty sure MYL would have no problem jailing them as well. Just not his sainted parents, who obviously did a bang-up job raising a paragon of virtue such as his fine self…someone who can’t even understand due process, rules of law and rules of evidence.

  7. Because nobody in Canada is stupid enough to buy the victim mentality peddled on us by Khadr. No doubt more than a few of us are disappointed he was saved by American medics at all.

    • So sayeth the biggest fraud and fabulist in the Canadian blogosphere.

    • Raphael, I may have missed it/them, but I am not aware that Omar has been peddling the mom-and-dad-made-me-go victim story. Has he?

      And I am not at all disappointed that the US military saved him on the battlefield. I want my country and her allies to always be the good guys. No question this problem “disappears” if the USA wasn’t so careful in the first place. But: No question the USA/Canada/NATO/etc. are the better team for being so careful in the first place.

      • No question this problem “disappears” if the USA wasn’t so careful in the first place.

        How brutish and primitive. You diminish all Canadians.

      • Of course Omar has been peddling that via his lawyers. He is very well cognizant of everything he did, and we only know likely 1/100th of the crimes he’s committed. The kid was raised in Canada, but willingly went to the battlefield to kill Americans. No doubt he’d have slit the necks of our soldiers if given the opportunity.

        • Of course Omar has been peddling that via his lawyers. He is very well cognizant (sic) of everything he did, and we only know likely 1/100th of the crimes he’s committed. The kid was raised in Canada, but willingly went to the battlefield to kill Americans. No doubt he’d have slit the necks of our soldiers if given the opportunity.

          You are such a pathological liar.

      • The USA wasn’t the one being careful. It was a real live human being acting like…well a real live human being. States should uphold principles, but it’s individuals who give those principle any meaning at all. And if our principles mean anything at all we should honour our commitments in law and deal with Khadr ourselves.

        • Terrorists act freely because they know there are no legal consequences to their actions. It’s nearly impossible to prove what Omar did, just as his father died fighting the Pakistani Army, but he remains an “alleged” terrorist. But by all means, let’s incur more expenses talking about Omar, providing more lawyer consultations, airfare back here, taxpayer mental assessments, social assistance as he is repatriated. I’m certain he hasn’t nearly cost us enough money yet.

          • A bit of advice.

            Look out the window, not the one with the dials/buttons around it.

            See there? That’s reality.

            24? It’s TV.

            Austin

          • Austin,

            I haven’t the faintest clue what you’re talking about. I don’t watch television. It’s dreck.

        • “It was a real live human being acting like…well a real live human being” ??? Whatever.

          If the shoe were on the other foot, I’m sure Khadr would have been a real live human being doing something completely different.

          • sf
            There’s the rub i guess. If the shoe were on the other foot is completely irrelevant, yr basically saying that because he might have not acted decently then no one else has any reason to. This is a morally bankrupt position to

          • You’re putting words in my mouth, and claiming I am saying the exact opposite of what I am saying.

            I’m responding to your statement that the Americans deserve no credit, because they were doing what humans do, by pointing out that the humans on the other side of the conflict don’t do that at all.

            So you are completely wrong, it is not such an insignificant act to save the life of someone who tried to kill you. ESPECIALLY if the Taliban, the other side in the conflict, would not do the same!

            You claim the moral high ground, and then you dismiss any other claim to morality as insignificant.

          • sf
            just maybe we misunderstand each others position. My post was admittedly badly written, if indeed you’re responding to the post i think you are. i was merely saying that states are only moral when it’s citizens act so. Of course the US deserves credit for saving his life. But you can’t argue that because others aren’t moral or humane then we aren’t obliged to obey our own laws. It’s what sets us apart, or it should be!

          • Fair enough KC, that ends that line of disagreement.

            And I would agree with you, in the respect that our own laws do, in fact, set us apart, from many other countries.

            And that would leave us at a point where we disagree on whether the government is in fact obeying (or not) our own laws with the position on Khadr, or perhaps we disagree on what our own laws should be saying about that, or something along those lines. But I have nothing more to add, I think I’ve said my piece on that issue.

        • Oh, kc, please expand your thinking. The USA is incredibly careful by training its soldiers in the rules of warfare. The medics didn’t just save Omar because they were humane people (although I am happy to believe they are). This wounded guy was saved because the USA trains its troops to do exactly that, and because the trauma units and field hospitals treat according to need, not friend-foe status.

          • True enough. To their eternal credit, they will save the terrorist who a moment ago was chucking grenades at them. There is no question that soldiers do their job. Khadr and his ilk were there for one reason only. To slit the necks of the infidels.

          • MYL
            No you might want to broaden yrs. Individual people acting morally give meaning to a state, constitution or any human endeavour. Without it nothing else matters or has any value. Does that mean the US isn’t a great country, of course not.; moral individuals make it so . Yr last pt only confirms mine.

      • You guys live in a box. Don’t you read? Do you all have poor short term memory? Unable to amass information beyond that which you are spoon-fed by the party?

        Here is a kid dragged to Afghanistan by his father, who associated with Al-qaeda to be taught what it is to be a “man”, and the kid gets caught in the cross-fire of an invasionary force (i.e. the US) who is intent on punishing the Taliban for not handing bin Laden over to them.

        In the middle of a fire fight with everyone around him being killed, this kid *may* have lobbed a grenade that *may* have killed a soldier in the middle of armed combat. So the US army incarcerates this 15 year old kid, as, get this, not a “war criminal”, or a “POW”, but in this new fangled bush-speak an “enemy combatant”.

        And this kid is the “evil terrorist scion”? Give me a freakin’ break.

        Due process. Human rights.

        This is Canada.

        We are supposed to be the leaders when it comes to issues like these, not some banana republic with their collective fingers up their noses unless you are a card carrying member of the politburo (otherwise known as the CPC).

        Austin

        • Excellent point Austin.

          I take it you will be housing Omar Khadr in your house? Volunteering your services to help him? Providing your income to feed and clothe him? Buying his plane ticket home? Will you welcome him at Pearson with a t-shit saying “I went to Guantanamo Bay for 7 years and all I got was this lousy t-shirt”?

          Remember to sleep with one eye open. You know, just in case you might be an eensy-weensy bit wrong in your moralizing here.

          • Ah…the sweat of exertion. That was quite the knee slapper there, Raphael. Really it was.

            Moralizing? See that’s the thing…it’s a nice thing to have…”morals”…maybe you should try to find some. Maybe the Harper and the Conservatives should have a go at it too.

            Treat people like shit, and they will smack you down hard the first chance they get. Treat people with respect, and they are more likely to be your friend (strange thing that, eh? Sorry, perhaps it is a bit too “out there” for you).

            But really, why are you guys lacking penises? Why does the world scare you so much?

            Austin

          • Austin,

            I’m glad you approve.

            For all this wasted breath on Omar we could have solved cancer by now.

            And what does this have to do with Harper or the Cons? I didn’t realize they could snap their fingers and demand the U.S. release terrorists.

            But I do enjoy your equivocating on how terrorism is morally justified. Nice. Very nice.

            I suppose you think you’ve a point of some nature?

          • Austin So Very Little Makes Sense:

            You write:

            “Treat people like shit, and they will smack you down”

            and:

            “it’s a nice thing to have…”morals”…maybe you should try to find some”

            in the same comment? Are you kidding me?

          • Clearly, sf and Raphael, “morality” is a concept that is a bit alien for you.

            “How dare people smack me back after I humiliate them and treat them like shit! How dare they!”

            Sheesh.

            Austin

          • Were they american “stripes”, Raphael? Or are you just queasy from the brutality and callousness?

            Children have no moral compass except that which they learn from their environment. Do you even understand the reasoning behind the international attitude towards “child soldiers”?

            Austin

          • Austin, every post you write makes less sense than the previous one, I don’t think you are even bothering to try to make sense anymore. BTW, you don’t need to put your name at the bottom, it appears to the left. We know it’s you.

          • Austin,

            I know it helps yourself to think this is all a case of a “child soldier” so that you don’t have to think of the graver implications of Canadian immigrants breeding terrorists here. It helps to call this murderer a “child soldier” because it allows you to use your political agenda to prove some kind of point that falls by the wayside when confronted by that reality you care so much about. The reality is that Omar and his good friends at Gitmo want to kill you. He was raised in Canada, but actively chose to turn to terrorism. This child soldier nonsense is your way of using a political agenda against Bush/Harper. It’s going to suck now that Obama is in power, not having that convenient fallback of blame.

          • Gee sf…here’s an exercise…try to use your brain, and think.

            That’s usually a good way to try make sense of something.

            And thanks for pointing out that my name shows up at the side. It’s almost like you are trying to be clever and helpful…but you’re not.

            Austin

          • The reality is that Omar and his good friends at Gitmo want to kill you. He was raised in Canada, but actively chose to turn to terrorism.

            Is this the evangelical christian talking? You got this special insight from God?

            Otherwise, on what do you base this conjecture?

            Austin

        • Nice summary, Austin. A bit skimpy on the USA-putting-Omar-back-together-again, but then, short term memory is what it is, I suppose.

          Recap: fifteen year old over in Afghanistan ends up in US military custody. Canada’s jurisdiction over that Afghan zone at the time? Canada’s jurisdiction over the USA Military Police? Canada’s jurisdiction over a piece of US territory on Cuban soil? Help out my short-term memory. Which pieces of those puzzles has Her Majesty annexed in the name of Canada? The family of a Canadian photographer who never took another breath outside of Iran might be interested in answers to these questions.

          • The family of a Canadian photographer who never took another breath outside of Iran might be interested in answers to these questions.

            All those people look alike to you, eh?

            Gahd, you’re a bigot.

          • Sure…put some of them back together again…sodomize others…electrocute some…oh…and beat them to death. And even better, put them back together so that you can torture him…

            That generosity…it’s quite moving really. All balances out, eh?

            Was the US granted extraterritorial rights over Afghanistan? Did they annex Afghanistan? It was in the middle of a combat operation that, as far as I’m aware, hasn’t finished yet.

            Is Khadr a Canadian citizen? Was he a child when he was caught?

            Please focus on facts, MYL, not conjecture or projection.

            And just to make sure you get this: just because muslims are in Iran as well as Afghanistan, doesn’t make them the same. Shocking I know. Might as well lump them in with evangelical Christians, MYL.

            Austin

          • Austin, are you suggesting they shouldn’t have taken Omar prisoner on the battlefield? A non-uniformed belligerent accused of killing an American soldier? Hello?

            As far as I know Omar is a Canadian citizen. I frankly don’t know if he is a citizen of any other country, and except that I am no fan of dual citizenship in the first place, I don’t particularly care.

            You’re the one bringing up the muslim thing, mate. Your last paragraph betrays your occasional capacity to make an argument in a debate. Pity. That photographer’s “crime” was taking pictures. Canada’s authority in Iran was nil. Omar’s (alleged!) crime was murder while a non-uniformed illegal combatant. Canada’s authority at Gitmo is nil. Why do we care more about Omar than Khazemi? I submit: because so many, present company included, enjoy the little shiver of excitement that comes with tut-tutting those damn Yanks. Whatever turns you on.

          • My bad, MYL…I didn’t put a lot of thought in the connection you were trying to make…

            The question then is rather than sitting on our butts, waiting for the country that has incarcerated our citizen, are we doing our utmost to ensure that they are receiving due process? Is it because it involves Muslims and/or muslim countries that we turn our backs?

            In point of fact, I/we do not care more about Khadr than Khazemi. At the time, as I recall, we cared even less about the both of them, until after Khazemi was dead, and more details about Khadr were revealed.

            It is about what our country will do for us as canadian citizens when we find ourselves in conditions which we may have inadvertently placed ourselves, consciously or unwittingly.

            As far as “tut-tutting” the americans, it is irrelevant here, as it was for the other foreign nationals that were repatriated.

            Austin

          • Austin says:
            It is about what our country will do for us as canadian citizens when we find ourselves in conditions which we may have inadvertently placed ourselves, consciously or unwittingly.

            Foreign Affairs says:
            If you break the laws of another country, you are subject to the judicial system of that country. Being a foreigner or not knowing the local laws is not an excuse, any more than it would be in Canada. Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada can neither protect you from the consequences of your actions nor override the decisions of local authorities.

            http://www.voyage.gc.ca/publications/imprisonment-emprisonnement-eng.asp

          • The question, MYL, is has one actually broken the laws of that state? Or is it theatre?

            What “law” did Khazemi break? What “law” did Khadr break?

            Hence the need for intervention.

            Austin

        • Even if your moralizing were the slightest bit accurate (which it isn’t), Canada has not the slightest thing to do with this. A passport is not a get-out-of-jail-for-free card to use when you kill someone in a foreign country.

          • Everyone knows the Khadr’s were all “anchor babies” anyway. None are real Canadians. They were deposited here by Ahmed Said and then raised under Islamic law. This is the danger of multiculturalism. We have reaped what we have sowed in the seeds of myopic utopian leftism.

          • Everyone knows the Khadr’s were all “anchor babies” anyway. None are real Canadians. They were deposited here by Ahmed Said and then raised under Islamic law. This is the danger of multiculturalism. We have reaped what we have sowed in the seeds of myopic utopian leftism.

            Oh my God, you are so retarded. What makes you so awful Raffles, is that you think you’re smart. You are, quite seriously, the dumbest person I know.

            Why can’t you acknowledge your low IQ? It’s not sin.

          • you are doing one hell of an impersonation, dehyphenated tiguy.

          • you are doing one hell of an impersonation, dehyphenated tiguy.

            An impersonation of what?

          • This is my favourite part:

            “We have reaped what we have sowed in the seeds of myopic utopian leftism.”

            Isn’t that wild?

        • Ahem.

          Tweedle-dum (sf)…meet Tweedle-dee (Raphael).

          Austin

  8. This is the danger of multiculturalism

    Yes, Canada is such a dangerous country.

    • Fortunately the Khadrs chose to wage war on the infidels outside of Canada.

  9. Sorry, folks, I didn’t realize this was going to morph into a mutual insult society. I just realized I’ve got paint to go watch dry. Bye.

  10. Sorry, folks, I didn’t realize this was going to morph into a mutual insult society. I just realized I’ve got paint to go watch dry. Bye.

    • Sorry, folks, I didn’t realize this was going to morph into a mutual insult society.

      Yeah, right..

      God, mama MYL really has a lot to answer for.

  11. More than any grenade-hurling incident, what makes Canadians uncomfortable about this case and makes them unsympathetic to this family is the way that Omar’s mother pointed out the utter ridiculousness of Canada’s “come and get it” welfare system with her comments about health care a couple of years ago.

    What it shows about the Canadian character is a deep devotion to the collective fairy tales dating back to the Trudeau era and beyond, but a growing apprehension that it might not actually be possible to abolish the laws of economics forever.

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