QP Live: Pierre Poilievre hogs all the questions

Your daily dose of political theatre

Adrian Wyld/CP

Adrian Wyld/CP

This morning, the federal minister for democratic reform said some nasty things about the man who oversees federal elections. The minister, Pierre Poilievre, accused the elections watchdog, Marc Mayrand, of opposing proposed government reforms because Mayrand “wants more power for himself, a bigger budget and less accountability.” The attack by a minister on an officer of parliament may have been unprecedented. It may have precedent, but is nevertheless “deeply dismaying.” Poilievre’s bill may be unconstitutional.

But if the democratic reform minister were prepared to step down his rhetoric, presumably we would have done so weeks go. This morning, his testimony at a Senate committee all but guaranteed he’d put on a one-man show during today’s Question Period. He’s inviting the best the opposition’s got. The spectacle precedes former auditor general Sheila Fraser’s appearance this evening at a parliamentary committee, where she will likely elaborate on last week’s claim that the Fair Elections Act is an “attack on our democracy.” Poilievre must want all this attention.

If that’s the case, and if the democratic reform minister so welcomes bombardment under a parliamentary spotlight, a single question remains. Why?

Maclean’s is your home for the daily political theatre that is Question Period. If you’ve never watched, check out our primer. Today, QP runs from 2:15 p.m. until just past 3. We livestream and liveblog all the action.

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QP Live: Pierre Poilievre hogs all the questions

  1. (The minister, Pierre Poilievre, accused the elections watchdog, Marc Mayrand, of opposing proposed government reforms because Mayrand “wants more power for himself, a bigger budget and less accountability.”)
    Wow! That’s rich coming from Poilièvre, ’cause that’s exactly what the (Un)Fair Elections Act is giving to the Cons: more power, more financing, less accountability..
    {If that’s the case, and if the democratic reform minister so welcomes bombardment under a parliamentary spotlight, a single question remains. Why?)
    Why, you ask? Simple: He’s a moron and he’s full of it.

    • No fan of Poilievre, but he is no moron. What has he actually done?
      He has taken an odorous bill and proclaimed that it is really about having ID to vote. He has done a pretty good job of baiting a response from opponents on that issue, knowing that it is not really an issue at all.
      Now, he has doubled down and made this a personal war between himself and Mayrand. There is no doubt that Mayrand opposes the bill, so he is not neutral etc.

      Why is this really important? What does Poilievre hope to accomplish? In a little less than 2 months, we will have the first trial associated with the robocall scandal. The Conservatives are certainly guilty, but which individual Conservatives are guilty is uncertain. The Conservatives need to muddy this water, they need to make those bringing the evidence forward appear partisan and biased. Sorry to say but Poilievre has gone some distance towards accomplishing his task.

  2. This is rapidly becoming a question of one or the other of these guys need to be gone…is there any need to say who it ought to be? See ya later skippy. Ya über partisan moron!

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