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Super Tuesday: Clinton, Trump look to pull away from rivals

Celebrity billionaire leads polls in almost all the dozen states voting on Super Tuesday


 
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump takes a selfie with a supporter as he prepares to leave a campaign event in Anderson, South Carolina October 19, 2015. (Chris Keane/Reuters)

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump takes a selfie with a supporter as he prepares to leave a campaign event in Anderson, South Carolina October 19, 2015. (Chris Keane/Reuters)

WASHINGTON — Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton see an opportunity to pull away from their rivals on Super Tuesday, as almost a dozen state contests across the country could accelerate their march toward the general election.

It’s busiest day of the 2016 primary campaign, with a quarter of Americans having their say.

The contests come at a turbulent moment for Republicans as they grapple with the prospect of Trump becoming the party’s nominee. His main rivals, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, are engaged in a frantic effort to stop the billionaire real estate magnate, but it was unclear whether they had made their move too late.

Trump on Tuesday said Rubio should drop out of the race if he doesn’t win a single Super Tuesday state. “He has to get out. He hasn’t won anything,” Trump told Fox News.

Like Trump, Clinton has won three of the four early voting contests, including in South Carolina on Saturday. Her victory over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders there was due to support from black voters, putting her in position for a strong showing in several Southern states with large African-American electorates voting Tuesday.

Clinton is casting herself as a civil alternative to the insults and bullying that have consumed the Republican race.

“What we can’t let happen is the scapegoating, the flaming, the finger pointing that is going on the Republican side,” she told voters Monday in Massachusetts. “It really undermines our fabric as a nation.”

Trump suggested that he’s even attracting Democrats to the Republican Party. “I can tell you the one person Hillary Clinton doesn’t want to run against is me,” he told ABC.

Sanders, who has energized young voters with his call for a political revolution, was seeking to pick up victories in states including Minnesota and Vermont. But he faces tough questions about whether he can rally minorities, who are core Democratic voters.

Democrats will vote in 11 states and American Samoa on Super Tuesday, with 865 delegates up for grabs. It will take 1,237 delegates to secure the nomination at the party’s national convention in July.

Republicans will vote in 11 states, with 595 delegates at stake — nearly half the 1,237 delegates needed to gain the nomination at the party’s convention, also in July.

States holding voting contests in both parties Tuesday are Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and Virginia. Republicans vote in Alaska and Democrats in Colorado.

Trump was seeking to sweep the South, which would be a massive blow for Cruz. The Texas senator, a favourite of the region’s social conservatives and evangelical Christians, expected the South to be his strength, but now is simply hoping for a victory in his home state.

Rubio is seeking to stay competitive in the delegate count Tuesday and hopes to pull off a win in his home state of Florida on March 15.

The Florida senator has cast himself as Republicans’ best chance to win in a general election and has received a flood of endorsements from party officials after other more mainstream candidates dropped out.

An Associated Press survey of Republican senators and governors across the country showed just under half of respondents would not commit to backing Trump if he’s the nominee. Their reluctance foreshadowed a potentially extraordinary split in the party this fall.


 

Super Tuesday: Clinton, Trump look to pull away from rivals

  1. Oh, Gawd…..

    Please tell me this orange blowhard will NOT become the President of the United States, with his finger on the largest arsenal in the world.

    Tell the Americans to look to Canada if they want to see what happens when you elect someone based on popularity as opposed to competence.

    Our leader spends more time taking selfies and learning his lines for Question period than he does actually having any serious thoughts. (in fact, we all know that Serious thoughts are left for Gerry to handle…but you get my drift)

  2. I will give Trump credit for one thing and this should be a lesson to the GOP going forward. His statement ‘Bush lied, people died’ struck a major chord with Americans and especially the thousands of families who lost a son or daughter or are now living with a debilitating life time injury from being wounded over in the middle east. Finally, someone has said it and Jeb Bush, rightfully so, has pulled out of the race. Trump is bringing to the surface a lot of ugly about American politics and it is due for a shake up. What the Republican party needs to do is completely disassociate itself with the Bush family and admit that Iraq was wrong, but they naturally wont, they will rely on the collective short term memory that has been honed and developed as America tries to understand what the Kardashians next move will be.

    Meanwhile, Shillary is shouting “America has always been great” while she cashes her Goldman Sachs cheques for ‘speaking fees’ and conveniently ignores no one went to jail in ’08. America is great if the corporation needs another political shill.

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