In Ukraine, new leaders face skepticism — inside and outside of Kyiv - Macleans.ca
 

In Ukraine, new leaders face skepticism — inside and outside of Kyiv

Video: Foreign correspondent Michael Petrou reports from Kyiv


 

Maclean’s correspondent Michael Petrou reports from Kyiv.

In Sunday’s dispatch from Independence Square, Petrou talked to demonstrators who explained why they are reinforcing barricades, rather than dismantling fortifications.

Here, Petrou reports from the grounds of parliament where protesters have gathered while politicians meet inside:

Earlier today Petrou detailed the challenges ahead for the interim government:

 

Related stories:

Petrou is on the ground in Ukraine. He’s on Twitter at @michaelpetrou. His latest reporting appears below:



 
Filed under:

In Ukraine, new leaders face skepticism — inside and outside of Kyiv

  1. Part of the problem is the poor grades that Russia and Ukraine receive from Freedom House and Transparency International.

    When that is changed, then real progress can be realized, instead of relying too much on hope.

  2. Extracting Ukraine from the Russian orbit peacefully is a trillion dollar project, and a multidecade Marshall Plan. Many Ukrainians are going to be surprised when Europe and the United States only offer pennies, and brutal austerity. If the choice is Russia or the IMF, after a year or two of the IMF, Ukrainians might go crawling back to Russia.

    The EU deal was offered hardly any money, limited market access, and no path to membership.

    It is really sad that Ukraine was used as a pawn between the United States (and Europe) and Russia. It really should have been a joint trust-building project. Instead the Americans wanted to pay back Putin for Georgia, and Ukraine is going to be an economic wasteland for a generation now.

    The result of this is that Canada is going to become a lot more Ukrainian over the next twenty years. I expect that we will open the immigration and refugee doors pretty wide, and I will fully support doing this.

  3. It saddens me that the media do not report on the interference in this country by the United States and how it was caught on tape. People need to know the truth out there and that is the Ukraine is a divided country that is being destabilized by the US in order to cause problems for Russia.
    What is the next step for the Ukraine? Are they going to have a civil war or will they split the country in two?
    Somehow I do not think that the US cares about that as long as Russia feels some pain.
    It is unfortunately the history of this country (and Poland) to be caught in the middle of imperialism.