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Our home and frozen land: A photo essay

February brought record-breaking levels of snow and cold, butwinter is, for Canadians, simply a time to get on with the day


 
RAILWAY SNOWPLOW

An Ontario Southland Railway snowplow clearing snow on the OSR St. Thomas Subdivision railway line in Gladstone, Ont., Feb. 13, 2015. Credit: Stephen C. Host/CP

 Photo Essay for Tumblr Rachel Browne Wed 2/25/2015 5:52 PM Thanks, Rachel! Maclean's Photo  Wed 2/25/2015 5:09 PM To: Rachel Browne; You replied on 2/25/2015 5:52 PM. Hey Rachel, Here are the images properly sized for web! The captions and credits are below each image. Let me know if you have any trouble downloading the images or questions. Thanks Rachel Inline image 1 An Ontario Southland Railway snowplow clearing snow on the OSR St. Thomas Subdivision railway line in Gladstone, Ont., Feb. 13, 2015.  Credit: Stephen C. Host/CP Inline image 3 The snow cuttings on Water Street in Charlottetown on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015 are higher than a pedestrian's head after a major blizzard left 80 centimetres of snow in Charlottetown and across the province. The province is slowly digging put after the storm on Islander Day weekend. Credit: Brian McInnis/Charlottetown Guardian/CP

The snow cuttings on Water Street in Charlottetown on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015 are higher than a pedestrian’s head after a major blizzard left 80 centimetres of snow in Charlottetown and across the province. The province is slowly digging put after the storm on Islander Day weekend. Credit: Brian McInnis/Charlottetown Guardian/CP

MAC09_PHOTOESSAY04

A man walks on frozen Lake Ontario in Toronto. February 2, 2015.
Credit: Joel Gale.

winter surf

A surfer heads from the frigid waters of Cow Bay, N.S. near Halifax on Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015. Hooded wetsuits along with neoprene gloves and booties are required in the sub zero temperature water. Credit: Andrew Vaughan/CP

Related reading: Scott Feschuk on the nine stages of Canadian cold.


 

Our home and frozen land: A photo essay

  1. Unfortunately, the sub-heading is wrong. Canadians don’t embrace winter anything like the Russians and Scandinavians do. Instead, we complain about the cold, hide indoors, and escape to tropical destinations as often as our budgets and life constraints allow. Far from a nation of winter-hardy outdoorsy types, we’ve become a nation of sissies, myself included. We’ve even deluded ourselves into almost believing we could invite/bribe some island nation like Turks & Caicos to become a province, thus giving us our own tropical escape. How nutty is that? I’m starting to find it almost embarrassing.

    I used to X-country ski no matter how cold it got. Now I make up a million excuses not to. Used to play sponge hockey (i.e. hockey played with broom ball shoes and a sponge puck, a sport unique to Winnipeg) on outdoor rinks in minus 35 weather – not including windchill. We would watch each others’ faces on the bench for white spots, which meant frost bite. The winters here in Ottawa aren’t nearly as bad as out west (this year excepted) and I spend my time indoors, and I’m not alone in doing so. It’s really a shame. Not sure when we became so sissified – but it’s time we snapped out of it. Winter can be a wonderful thing. Ever heard a child complain about too much snow? Adults could learn something from them.

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