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Desperate to cut their teeth

Changing standards for training schools have created a flood of dental hygienists


 
The share of hygienists who are younger than 29 has gone up by 17 per cent

Jessika Hill /AP

Though she could use more hours, Maria Di Bartolomeo, who works in three different  dental offices, considers herself “pretty lucky.” That’s because the 23-year-old from Woodbridge, Ont., is a recently graduated dental hygienist practising in the profession’s toughest provincial market. “Right now I have to take what I can get,” says Di Bartolomeo, who splits her time between offices in Woodbridge, Richmond Hill and Etobicoke. Competition to land even a few hours a week is ruthless, she says: “There are just stacks and stacks of resumés that come in.” And graduates are so desperate for a job they’re willing to work for as little as $20 an hour—about 30 per cent less than the going rate in recent years for newly minted hygienists.

Every source Maclean’s spoke with had the same answer for what’s gone wrong in Ontario: there are too many private schools, too many graduates, and the market is flooded. And the problem seems to be spreading. Data collected by the Canadian Dental Hygienists Association (CDHA) shows that between 2006 and 2009 salaries have declined 6.5 per cent and the share of dental hygienists younger than 29 was up 17 per cent. Part of the issue is that Ontario has 28 dental hygiene programs, 24 of which are private colleges. By comparison, second-place Quebec has a total of eight private and public schools, while Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia all have one school each. And Ontario schools are pumping grads into other provinces, chiefly Alberta and British Columbia, says CDHA acting executive director Ann Wright.

The proliferation of schools in Ontario started after the provincial government passed an act in 2005 that allowed private dental hygiene programs to seek accreditation after opening, says Wright. While all dental education programs must still demonstrate to the Commission on Dental Accreditation of Canada that they meet certain minimum standards, since September 2006, in Ontario at least, the schools have been able to start training students before passing the quality test. With barriers to entry into the lucrative Ontario market so low, schools started springing up everywhere. At one point there were more than 40 schools, says Wright. (Numbers have declined as several schools failed to achieve the required accreditation and were subsequently shut down.)

Last year, the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities determined that all dental hygiene programs must meet Ontario’s accreditation requirements by December 2012—seven schools have already announced they won’t make that deadline. Still, it will take a while before the market assimilates the high number of hygienists that Ontario schools have produced in recent years, and the province could still have more than 20 schools.

Some graduates are feeling shortchanged. After all, a two-year program at one of the private schools costs about $40,000, says Wright. “When I went into school, there was an abundance of jobs and I thought it would be the same when I got out, but now with over $60,000 in personal school debt and no job it looks really bleak,” lamented an anonymous commenter on the public chat room of the website DentalHygienist.ca.

Others remain optimistic. Tiffany Halioua, a dental hygiene student at Aurora Dental College, says she was aware of the tough job market but enrolled anyway. A job in the health sector with flexible hours and no handling of blood is a dream. “I’m expecting that when I graduate I won’t have a full-time job,” but it’s worth it, she says.


 

Desperate to cut their teeth

  1. No handling of blood!? I feel the need to point out that this person is sadly mistaken…

  2. No handling of blood!? I feel the need to point out that this person is sadly mistaken…

    • NO BLOOD please do us a favour and close that school immediately,

      • Did you not read my reply to this posting Kim? And you should also know as well that Maclean's will be publishing a letter saying that I was misquoted.

      • It has been denied accreditation at least twice….go figure!

        •  If you have every gone through the process of accreditation you might of understood why.  If you took the time to check the schools scoring on the board exams maybe you might of not judged so quickly 

          • That’s “have,” not “of.”

    • I never said anything about "no blood" I just said the duties of a dental hygienist are not as invasive as the duties of a surgeon or Dentist. It's pretty sad that this was edited as me saying "no blood" and should be an embarrassment to the magazine itself for printing out such false information.

      P.S. Notice how the words 'A job in the health sector with flexible hours and no handling of blood is a dream' aren't in quotation marks, which should also point out that those aren't the words I said.

      • I respect that you came on here to defend yourself. If you were misqouted as you say, then Macleans should clarify that.

        There are MANY hygienists who are very upset at the direction this profession has taken in the last few years and an article like this really gets us riled up. Best of luck to you as you complete your studies.

        • The magazine is. They are writing a retraction.

      • I didn't think there was anything wrong with what you said nor how McLeans wrote. It just said to me that the position is not as 'messy' as many other positions in the Health Sector.

    • Exactly Tamara. It is an extremely invasive treatment that we provide and blood is part of the inflammatory process.

  3. No blood!!! I think that her college will be pretty embarassed by her comment.

  4. No blood!!! I think that her college will be pretty embarassed by her comment.

  5. No handling of blood?!! Hysterical!!!

  6. No handling of blood?!! Hysterical!!!

  7. About time somebody actually wrote an article on this. These private schools have made a mess of Dental Hygiene and reduced our profession to nothing more than a trade.
    "no handling of blood?" talk about dumbing down our jobs…

  8. About time somebody actually wrote an article on this. These private schools have made a mess of Dental Hygiene and reduced our profession to nothing more than a trade.
    "no handling of blood?" talk about dumbing down our jobs…

    • I couldn't agree more. I attended a University and obtained a degree and was VERY proud of how educated and valued I felt…that is until I moved to Ontario. It is ludicrous here! Half my skills I learned I can't even practise! I find it outright depressing…

    • Darn right! The standards among the dentists as a whole are also being driven downwards, very quickly, as the emphasis is on high-volume output of low-quality graduates – no matter what tripe the uni dental schools claim, and they know they are lying. I know; I have taught at both U of T and UWO as a clinical professor and lecturer and was so turned off I finally withdrew from teaching.
      It's not only the academic standards that have dropped. The moral standards have gone down down too, in a cause-and-effect spiral.

  9. It is very important for the public to to be informed and understand the value and quality of dental hygiene education. There are many more of these articles that need to be written. Unfortunately, dental hygiene is one of few professions that the standards are not regulated across Canada. In time this will change, and then Ontario will continue shutting down their below standard private schools.

  10. It is very important for the public to to be informed and understand the value and quality of dental hygiene education. There are many more of these articles that need to be written. Unfortunately, dental hygiene is one of few professions that the standards are not regulated across Canada. In time this will change, and then Ontario will continue shutting down their below standard private schools.

  11. These private Dental Hygiene "courses" are a joke. They charge these students a fortune, they aren't actual Dental Hygienists when they graduate….I know of two who moved here to Newfoundland….one employed, who didn't even know which instruments to use…the other who couldn't pass the National exam. It's crazy ! Who allowed this to happen ??? How would nurses, physiotherapists, doctors, radiologists feel if someone offered a "quicky" course in their profession ! The public doesn't know the difference between a REAL hygienist, & a Quick course hygienist….they should be guaranteed a qualified person is working on them. And YES, there is blood…it's normal…….I can't believe she ever worked on a patient !!

  12. These private Dental Hygiene "courses" are a joke. They charge these students a fortune, they aren't actual Dental Hygienists when they graduate….I know of two who moved here to Newfoundland….one employed, who didn't even know which instruments to use…the other who couldn't pass the National exam. It's crazy ! Who allowed this to happen ??? How would nurses, physiotherapists, doctors, radiologists feel if someone offered a "quicky" course in their profession ! The public doesn't know the difference between a REAL hygienist, & a Quick course hygienist….they should be guaranteed a qualified person is working on them. And YES, there is blood…it's normal…….I can't believe she ever worked on a patient !!

    • I am getting really tired of reading all these ludicrous comments concerning private DH programs. If you consider yourself to be a "REAL" hygienist because of the school you attended, then you should have learned a little something about EVIDENCE-BASED research and critical thinking rather than basing judgement on isolated incidents or internet forums! Shame on you and your ignorance! Many of these schools consistently produce National Board Exam results well above the national average.

      • In Ontario, students can choose to attend a 2 year Community College program (approx. 9 months each year) or a private school program (18 months with no break). I personally attended a Community College program for half a year (which I did not complete due to serious health issues), and years later decided to attend a private school because it was close to home. In my experience, I actually found the private school had longer days with more structure, as the instructors never cancelled class and they really followed the course outlines. I feel that they provided me with a more solid foundation than the Community College. This was only my personal experience based on my learning style at the two schools I attended. I am by no means saying that private schools are better than Community Colleges- only that accredited private schools provide quality education and are not "dumbing-down" the profession. Their graduates are qualified "REAL HYGIENISTS" registered with the CDHO. The people who seem to be "dumbing-down" the profession are the RDH's posting comments such as these.

    • I couldn't agree more. I feel bad for those individuals who got "short changed" and attended one of these colleges. In the long run it doesn't pay off and they don't know half of the things those that have graduated from longer, accreditied facilites know. Fact.

    • Janis,

      Be careful of how fast you are to judge. Hearsay is dangerous, and unless you have experienced what someone else has, then judgement should be withheld. Yes, it is a tight market in Ontario at present, and yes, there are SOME private Colleges that are substandard. They cannot, however, all be painted with the same brush. The substandard
      Colleges are well on the way to extinction, and sadly, so are some of the best ones. Let's not forget that there have been problems found across Canada at some of the long-standing Community Colleges as well. As an instructor, I can safely say that the curriculum and clinical requirements provided at some private Colleges are far superior to what has been offered in years gone by at some Community Colleges. At the end of the day, the employer, staff, and client
      will know which graduates are skilled, knowledgeable and committed regardless of their alma mater. Accrediatation processes are ongoing, and the best will be left standing.

  13. A couple points:

    Great hygienists graduate from both public and private training programs – caution re negatively stereotyping privately trained hygienists. As with many other professions, the training program provides only the foundation and tools to excel – the rest is intrinsic to the individual.

    Lurking in the shadows behind this boom in new hygienists is a meteoric rise in fees charged by the licensing colleges/regulating bodies.

  14. A couple points:

    Great hygienists graduate from both public and private training programs – caution re negatively stereotyping privately trained hygienists. As with many other professions, the training program provides only the foundation and tools to excel – the rest is intrinsic to the individual.

    Lurking in the shadows behind this boom in new hygienists is a meteoric rise in fees charged by the licensing colleges/regulating bodies.

    • Lurking in the shadows behind this boom in new hygienists is a smiling dentist who has 200 resumes in the drawer and the ability to hire cheap labor, who had minimal requirements to get into a "stripmall DH school".

      • I totally agree with you. I believe you get what you pay for and a professional well educated hygienist is a practice builder if the DDS that commented above doesnt understand this they are sadly mistaken and should be reminded that our obligation is to our patients not the dentists bottom line. The evidence of the kind of thinking of this DDS is what is wrong with the dentistry profession.

      • Totally agree with susan.

        Very true.

    • I understand that all of us gain knowledge during and after our graduation from our post secondary education. I feel that because dentist really have very little skill to perform hygiene treatment it is really not your place to comment on where we gain our greatest skills. Possibly it is the involvement of dentists in our profession that is dictating our ablilities to do our jobs when really they should stick to what they know best.

    • A "training program, " as you call it, is where skills and knowledge are acquired. If the foundation is weak, it is very unlikely that the individual will have the base that is required to build upon. If you don't know what you're doing to begin with, the experience you gain in the field is NOT going to make you a better hygienist. You will be a hygienist who is shorting the public by providing unsatisfactory care. A big problem is that the billing will look the same, thereby pleasing the dentist who can now pay a lower wage for that billing.

  15. The real issue isn't the number of colleges offering dental hygiene education, but the motivating factor behind their proliferation.

    There is a sector of the dental profession who wish to drive down the wages. It is not about what is best for the public (consumer), but how to increase their profits. Typically, dental hygienists are employed by Dentists. Many of those employers are capitalizing on the desperation of new graduates by paying very low wages.

    I applaud Maclean's Magazine for spotlighting this issue, but encourage them to further explore the issues that the Federal Competition Bureau has already investigated in Ontario. Try to find out who RK Howse is, and what his role in the Dental Profession is really all about. Let investigative reporting seek the answers that are so buried from public view…

  16. The real issue isn't the number of colleges offering dental hygiene education, but the motivating factor behind their proliferation.

    There is a sector of the dental profession who wish to drive down the wages. It is not about what is best for the public (consumer), but how to increase their profits. Typically, dental hygienists are employed by Dentists. Many of those employers are capitalizing on the desperation of new graduates by paying very low wages.

    I applaud Maclean's Magazine for spotlighting this issue, but encourage them to further explore the issues that the Federal Competition Bureau has already investigated in Ontario. Try to find out who RK Howse is, and what his role in the Dental Profession is really all about. Let investigative reporting seek the answers that are so buried from public view…

    • I wrote to Maclean's three years ago to give them a heads up on what is 'really' going on in Ontario. The politics must be too threatening to do the proper investigating that this story really needs. If we want to protect the public we should be looking in a few other closets where the skeletons are hiding!!! Just contact Janet Holmes of the Competition Bureau and she will tell you that there is a lot of documented evidence of 'tide selling' by the DDS's as well as threats to the clients if they go to an independent dental hygienist. Competition is good…especially in such a high price profession. By having a bit of competition the dentists are feeling threatened but it has brought about an affordable option for many Ontarians.

    • I don’t think an investigative reporter is the answer, i think a class action lawsuit is the way to pursue this.

      Please let me know your interest in supporting this?

  17. Lurking in the shadows behind this boom in new hygienists is a smiling dentist who has 200 resumes in the drawer and the ability to hire cheap labor, who had minimal requirements to get into a "stripmall DH school".

  18. As someone who graduated from a private college (when there were only 2 in Ontario), I feel confident in the education I received. It was (and is) fully accredited, and by no means a "quickie" education. the bored exam results for the school are consistent…and don't lie. it's a shame that that college and others will be lumped in with the sub standard schools that are popping up on every corner. I have a passion for this profession and did not choose to go into it on a whim. experience and continuing education, and generally a love of what you are doing, goes a long way for the quality of a dental hygienist. i've come across a few hygienists, both community and private college grads who are both sloppy and not very knowledgeable. Having said that, it's obvious that the surplus of schools is a huge problem, not just for those in the profession, but for the public as well. there is definitely greedy motivating factors behind the whole thing. The reality is that it's tanked the whole profession within about 3 short years. and the sad thing is it will take many many more years to reverse it.

  19. As someone who graduated from a private college (when there were only 2 in Ontario), I feel confident in the education I received. It was (and is) fully accredited, and by no means a "quickie" education. the bored exam results for the school are consistent…and don't lie. it's a shame that that college and others will be lumped in with the sub standard schools that are popping up on every corner. I have a passion for this profession and did not choose to go into it on a whim. experience and continuing education, and generally a love of what you are doing, goes a long way for the quality of a dental hygienist. i've come across a few hygienists, both community and private college grads who are both sloppy and not very knowledgeable. Having said that, it's obvious that the surplus of schools is a huge problem, not just for those in the profession, but for the public as well. there is definitely greedy motivating factors behind the whole thing. The reality is that it's tanked the whole profession within about 3 short years. and the sad thing is it will take many many more years to reverse it.

  20. Hard to believe there is no handling of blood in our profession considering one in two Canadians have gingivitis or worse. I must be doing something wrong!

  21. Hard to believe there is no handling of blood in our profession considering one in two Canadians have gingivitis or worse. I must be doing something wrong!

  22. For become a dental hygienist to Québec you must study 3 years to college. How someone can thinking become hygienist in only 1 years? It's amazing! The protection of customers is none!

    Sorry ! My english is relly bad!

  23. For become a dental hygienist to Québec you must study 3 years to college. How someone can thinking become hygienist in only 1 years? It's amazing! The protection of customers is none!

    Sorry ! My english is relly bad!

    • DH programs require approximately 18 months of training, whether in a Public Community College or in a Private Career College. The publics teach this over 2 years x 2 semester with a summer off in between. The privates generally teach straight through 18 months with just a few weeks off between terms.

      The teaching ours are the same or similar. The instructor requirements are the same. Most of them teach with the same books.

      The Private Career Colleges Act, 2005 regulates PCCs and hold them to very stringent standards, including putting up substantial bonds to protect students if they close suddenly. PCC students are also protected by the Training Completion Assurance Fund (TCAF), which has millions of dollars in it paid into by the PCC sector to protect students, including a Full Refund for all fees paid if there is no way to complete their education at another registered PCC.

      I don't know why CEGEPs teach this in 3 years as I only know the Ontario model. Hope this clarification helps.

      • Never the less, if you pay you get in. Your previous education may not be a qualifying factor with some of these colleges. Even interviews are done ore the phone, rather than in person.

      • Regardless, some of the private schools haven't been accredited either. Sorry my previous comment was under wrong reply.

  24. I totally agree with you. I believe you get what you pay for and a professional well educated hygienist is a practice builder if the DDS that commented above doesnt understand this they are sadly mistaken and should be reminded that our obligation is to our patients not the dentists bottom line. The evidence of the kind of thinking of this DDS is what is wrong with the dentistry profession.

  25. I understand that all of us gain knowledge during and after our graduation from our post secondary education. I feel that because dentist really have very little skill to perform hygiene treatment it is really not your place to comment on where we gain our greatest skills. Possibly it is the involvement of dentists in our profession that is dictating our ablilities to do our jobs when really they should stick to what they know best.

  26. The profession of Dental Hygiene is going to hell in a hand basket! Too many under qualified grads = reduced wages and more importantly, poor quality care for clients. The CDHO (the regulatory college for Dental Hygienists) is SUPPOSED to act on behalf of the public — to protect the safety of the public under the care and treatment of dental hygiene. Why are they not protecting the public? Here's why…..they are too busy "disciplining" DH's who treat their spouse and "auditing" portfolios as part of a "Quality Assurance" program. How about we ensure NEW GRADUATES are qualified and that the profession is maintained with SOME integrity left intact.

  27. The profession of Dental Hygiene is going to hell in a hand basket! Too many under qualified grads = reduced wages and more importantly, poor quality care for clients. The CDHO (the regulatory college for Dental Hygienists) is SUPPOSED to act on behalf of the public — to protect the safety of the public under the care and treatment of dental hygiene. Why are they not protecting the public? Here's why…..they are too busy "disciplining" DH's who treat their spouse and "auditing" portfolios as part of a "Quality Assurance" program. How about we ensure NEW GRADUATES are qualified and that the profession is maintained with SOME integrity left intact.

    • So true! May I add that we pay so that the public is protected from us!!!

  28. Ontario has by the most part, some excellent dental hygiene programs. Indeed Ontario is responsible for educating the majority of dental hygienists in Canada. Quality dental hygiene programs achieve accreditation through the Commission on Dental Accreditation of Canada (CDAC). CDAC is the body responsible for accrediting dental, dental specialty, dental residency, dental hygiene and dental assisting education programs across Canada. The majority of dental hygiene programs in Ontario are accredited. The ones who are not have been given a government imposed deadline to achieve accreditation status or close down. It is the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities that allows dental hygiene programs to open and operate not the dental hygiene regulatory body (CDHO)

  29. Ontario has by the most part, some excellent dental hygiene programs. Indeed Ontario is responsible for educating the majority of dental hygienists in Canada. Quality dental hygiene programs achieve accreditation through the Commission on Dental Accreditation of Canada (CDAC). CDAC is the body responsible for accrediting dental, dental specialty, dental residency, dental hygiene and dental assisting education programs across Canada. The majority of dental hygiene programs in Ontario are accredited. The ones who are not have been given a government imposed deadline to achieve accreditation status or close down. It is the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities that allows dental hygiene programs to open and operate not the dental hygiene regulatory body (CDHO)

    • Accreditation does not neccesarily mean the school is providing good education and training. If the minimum bar is met, a sub standard school can still become accredited. The bottom line is whie,l there are some great schools in Ontario, there are also many which are pumping out barely trained hygienists or hygienists who could not get into a better school. Here in BC, people who cannot fulfil the pre requisite courses just go to a private school in Ontario because it is easeir to get into. Then they come back here and are allowed to practice when they are not nearly as qualified. There shouldn't be a loophole for people who can't make the cut to get in here in BC, which will allow them to skirt around BC educational standards. Our market is being destroyed by people who heard hygiene pays well enough, and don't even care about the profession or achieving the highest qualification, and that is a disservice to the patients who pay for care.

  30. All dental hygienists who are registered to practice in Ontario have met the same stringent entry to practice requirements. Therefore, to suggest that there are somehow second class dental hygienists admitted into the profession is absurd. All dental hygiene graduates must pass a national certification examination and in addition, those graduates who graduate from non-accredited programs must pass the CDHO clinical competency evaluation process. The pass/fail rates for the NDHCB examination and the CDHO clinical competency evaluations are posted by school on the respective websites. The failure rates on these examinations would indicate that graduating from a dental hygiene program does not guarantee entry to practice. So called “under qualified grads” are not permitted to practice in Ontario!

  31. All dental hygienists who are registered to practice in Ontario have met the same stringent entry to practice requirements. Therefore, to suggest that there are somehow second class dental hygienists admitted into the profession is absurd. All dental hygiene graduates must pass a national certification examination and in addition, those graduates who graduate from non-accredited programs must pass the CDHO clinical competency evaluation process. The pass/fail rates for the NDHCB examination and the CDHO clinical competency evaluations are posted by school on the respective websites. The failure rates on these examinations would indicate that graduating from a dental hygiene program does not guarantee entry to practice. So called “under qualified grads” are not permitted to practice in Ontario!

    • I have seen an Ontario temp in my office who didn't even know how to put together a polishing hand piece. I'm not sure how she made it through school and exams and still didn't have even this basic skill but it does happen. Not all Ontario grads are substandard but there are quite a few here in BC who shouldn't be practicing. The difference in education alone bothers me… A full semester of anesthetic practice vs a weekend course? Three years vs one year? Everyone passes the board exam because it tests to the lowest standard common to all programs – no local, nothing advanced. This is why bc and Alberta schools have 99 – 100 percent pass rates while Ontario often sits in the 60 & 70 percent passes. Westcoast grads compared to Ontario are much more educated and prepared. There are great Ontario RDH's but there is also a major flaw with current education and labour mobility in this profession.

    • Ha, I'm guessing you are employed by the CDHO! Get your head out the sand….MANY of the grads from these private schools are GROSSLY "under qualified" — just ask the people who work with them! They may pass a written test and a clinical competency exam but they are NOT prepared when they graduate!

      While the Ministry may be responsible for allowing these schools to open, what exactly is the CDHO doing to protect the public from these graduates?

      • So true, if you want proof go to the cdho website http://www.cdho.org look at the exam results they are posted compare the results from private schools and community colleges. There is a huge difference often less than half pass the course.
        There is a reason that the community colleges have the reputation that they have. They are the Golden Standard.

    • Don't forget that every dental hygienist can write the board exam up to 4 times if they keep failing(need 65-70%) . And there's a big fee to write it each time$. I think it is too easy. I support a degree as entry to practise for dental hygienists.

  32. Ontario has the largest number of dental hygiene programs and the largest dental hygiene population in Canada. Yet still there are Ontarians who do not have access to dental hygiene services! Cost and accessibility are 2 of the main reasons. Dental hygienists who limit themselves to traditional practices within dental offices are finding employment opportunities dwindling. It is time for them to explore other avenues of service delivery that will open doors for underserviced communities. Dental hygienists are no longer tied to working for dentists.
    The CDHO regulates the practice of dental hygiene in Ontario and is committed to ensuring that the public benefits from the highest standards of excellence in practice by dental hygienists who sustain the interests and welfare of their clients and are responsive to the oral health needs of society. Entry to practice requirements, Standards of Practice, the quality assurance program and a fair complaints process ensures that the public is in good and competent hands whether the dental hygienist is a new practitioner or one who has been practicing for many years.

  33. Ontario has the largest number of dental hygiene programs and the largest dental hygiene population in Canada. Yet still there are Ontarians who do not have access to dental hygiene services! Cost and accessibility are 2 of the main reasons. Dental hygienists who limit themselves to traditional practices within dental offices are finding employment opportunities dwindling. It is time for them to explore other avenues of service delivery that will open doors for underserviced communities. Dental hygienists are no longer tied to working for dentists.
    The CDHO regulates the practice of dental hygiene in Ontario and is committed to ensuring that the public benefits from the highest standards of excellence in practice by dental hygienists who sustain the interests and welfare of their clients and are responsive to the oral health needs of society. Entry to practice requirements, Standards of Practice, the quality assurance program and a fair complaints process ensures that the public is in good and competent hands whether the dental hygienist is a new practitioner or one who has been practicing for many years.

    • My dentist goes strictly by the “Ontario Dental Association’s” I think that is the name
      so called recommendations once every sixth month for a check up.

      His dental hygienist always first checked the depths of all my gums
      and logged these in her documents she would tell me my gums where not the best.
      Always asked me if I flossed answer NO and I stopped feeling guilty about it.

      He always found something to fix and ruined my back teeth partly by me not
      diligently brushing twice a day (OK so it was my fault too.)

      When I feared that I’d loose my front teeth declined further appointments
      with him but not my DH every fourth month the third appointment in a year with my DH
      she ordered me to do a check up with him even when my teeth were doing fine.

      I booked an appointment with him and he found a loose tooth in the
      back wanted to fix it but I wanted to wait and see _ he let off on that.

      Two more visits to the hygienist and the tooth in the back had to go
      to chicken to pull it out myself I booked appointment with him to do so
      no problem as he had done it often enough for me.

      My insurance surprise _ changed its pay schedule and accepted
      two treatments per DH instead of only one must have noticed
      the fewer dentist charges.

      I have changed to brushing with baking soda using an Oral B
      automatic and brush the required time twice a day with no flossing.

      My teeth are better now since I take care of them.

      Pay for starting DH $23 per hour is sheer extortion
      considering my foul, contaminated and bloody breath.

      rvfw

    • I hope you know that exploring these "alternative work settings" is quite difficult. When you graduate from school you have minimum $25 000 debt and now can't find traditional employment to pay that off. You expect people with that kind of debt to buy equipment and head up to reserves or rural areas? You also need 2 years of work experience to apply to be self-initiated before you are legally allowed to do that. How could anyone be expected to succeed in this profession with such a difficult start. These private schools need to be shut down. Look at the NDHCB exam results and see which schools have the highest pass rate, the community colleges who have been operating for decades, not the pop-up schools. We are not limiting ourselves, the ministry of training and education has allowed us to be limited by poor regulation.

    • In my opinion I think the Ontario Dental Hyg. Assoc. has done a deservice to the people of Ontario. They have allowed students to graduate from these dental hyg. programs if they pass the minimum levels of testing. As a hyg that came into Ontario from a University background and had to go through the Ontario Dental Hyg. testing I can tell you it was a JOKE! The test was so easy I believe a high school graduate with science knowledge would be able to pass. Then they allow these graduates to actually perform hygiene skills on actual clients. Scary, Scary, scary………………………………….Then they pathetically hide behind the statement that, 'All graduates from accredited programs must show that they are able to pass these exams.'

  34. I have seen an Ontario temp in my office who didn't even know how to put together a polishing hand piece. I'm not sure how she made it through school and exams and still didn't have even this basic skill but it does happen. Not all Ontario grads are substandard but there are quite a few here in BC who shouldn't be practicing. The difference in education alone bothers me… A full semester of anesthetic practice vs a weekend course? Three years vs one year? Everyone passes the board exam because it tests to the lowest standard common to all programs – no local, nothing advanced. This is why bc and Alberta schools have 99 – 100 percent pass rates while Ontario often sits in the 60 & 70 percent passes. Westcoast grads compared to Ontario are much more educated and prepared. There are great Ontario RDH's but there is also a major flaw with current education and labour mobility in this profession.

  35. Ha, I'm guessing you are employed by the CDHO! Get your head out the sand….MANY of the grads from these private schools are GROSSLY "under qualified" — just ask the people who work with them! They may pass a written test and a clinical competency exam but they are NOT prepared when they graduate!

    While the Ministry may be responsible for allowing these schools to open, what exactly is the CDHO doing to protect the public from these graduates?

  36. DH programs require approximately 18 months of training, whether in a Public Community College or in a Private Career College. The publics teach this over 2 years x 2 semester with a summer off in between. The privates generally teach straight through 18 months with just a few weeks off between terms.

    The teaching ours are the same or similar. The instructor requirements are the same. Most of them teach with the same books.

    The Private Career Colleges Act, 2005 regulates PCCs and hold them to very stringent standards, including putting up substantial bonds to protect students if they close suddenly. PCC students are also protected by the Training Completion Assurance Fund (TCAF), which has millions of dollars in it paid into by the PCC sector to protect students, including a Full Refund for all fees paid if there is no way to complete their education at another registered PCC.

    I don't know why CEGEPs teach this in 3 years as I only know the Ontario model. Hope this clarification helps.

  37. I find it amusing that there are so many comments about the "under qualified" DH's from private career colleges, that are apparently flooding the market and making it difficult to find jobs at your expectation of income. We all write the same board exam, and those from non-accredited schools are also required to perform an additional clinical competency exam. Are the questions on these exams somehow easier for us?? Are the clinical exams that dictate your patient meet a specific degree of difficulty, (which are screened on spot with marks deducted if they do not meet the standards) rigged? Apparently it's fluke that these hygienists are able to make it into practice. I think it prudent to mention that with every profession there is a learning curve, when you take your skills learned in school and apply them in day to day practice. If as a hygienist you are intimated by these "less then qualified hygienist” taking all of "YOUR" jobs , maybe it's time to take a look in the mirror, if you are so over qualified nobody is looking to hire you. Maybe your negative attitude is coming across more than you think.

  38. I find it amusing that there are so many comments about the "under qualified" DH's from private career colleges, that are apparently flooding the market and making it difficult to find jobs at your expectation of income. We all write the same board exam, and those from non-accredited schools are also required to perform an additional clinical competency exam. Are the questions on these exams somehow easier for us?? Are the clinical exams that dictate your patient meet a specific degree of difficulty, (which are screened on spot with marks deducted if they do not meet the standards) rigged? Apparently it's fluke that these hygienists are able to make it into practice. I think it prudent to mention that with every profession there is a learning curve, when you take your skills learned in school and apply them in day to day practice. If as a hygienist you are intimated by these "less then qualified hygienist” taking all of "YOUR" jobs , maybe it's time to take a look in the mirror, if you are so over qualified nobody is looking to hire you. Maybe your negative attitude is coming across more than you think.

    • There is a huge difference between a graduate from a private and community college. Just ask any employer and they will tell you the same. I have Dental Hygienists at my office that graduated from a community college found work in 3 offices upon graduation and this is recently. Why? Because they graduated from a community college. It has a reputation like no other, it has earned it…..and employers know the quality of the graduate. You may have written the boards yes but it is the application of that knowledge that matters. The community colleges have had the time to work out all the rough spots. They have perfected the program and it shows in the graduates.

    • First of all, to work either independently or as part of a team, you will come across many different people, all of whom may not share your opinion. I hope with more experience in clinical hygiene and interpersonal skills with individual client's/patient's, you will gain a respect for the Hygienist's that graduated before you. If you stop, take a deep breath rather than using sarcasm and judgement, you'll see that they have a wealth of clinical experience that you have yet to aquire. Ann ally in the same profession makes for the running's of a great Dental Office, good luck!

    • Yes we all write the same exam, which tests to the LOWEST common competency across Canada . This is why the praires/BC score much higher pass percentages, they receive more education and there are less private schools. Alot of what we learn (local anesthetic, prescription writing) is not even on the exam, but I would love to see how many private school grads would fare with those questions if they were. It may not be a fluke as you say, but barely making it through is not really much better. It is not a matter of being "intimidated", more displeased at seeing sloppy care, left behind tartar, supra gingival scaling only and people who are unable to educate patients because they are under educated and trained themselves.

    • Personally I work full time and have since I graduted, so t is not an issue of not being hired, it is an issue of seeing care that is one step above supervised neglect and caring enough and having enough pride in m y profession to want to see substandard practioners be taken out of the market so that the patient receives the care they deserve. Not all Ontario grads or even private school grads are "bad", and I have seen BC grads who are not so great as well, the main message is that the standards for becoming a RDH need to be standardized so any hygienist who is under qualified does not slip through the cracks. Degree as entry to practice should be mandatory. There should be no option to "buy" your way into a profession simply by paying a higher fee adn short cutting around importnat education adn training.

  39. If you can't find a job within a 5K radius of your house, maybe your being unrealistic about how "flooded" the market actually is. Private career colleges may be 18 months, but this is only a condensed 2 year program, because there are no summer or spring breaks. Many community colleges have shortened days, compared to the private career colleges. Not to mention that many private colleges offer more clinic hours then community colleges, making this idea of a "fast track hygiene course" a ridiculous comment. Let's not forget that many community colleges consider a passing grade as 60%, whereas most private colleges have a minimum requirement of 70%. Looking at the statistics, regarding the NDHCB exam, private colleges as a whole are not ranking any lower than the community colleges and often out performing them. Ultimately, the best hygienist could come from the least reputable school. Your motivation, drive and passion for the profession will dictate your future. Good luck to all the new grads writing the board exam. I look forward to meeting all those who are concentrating on the new developments and possibilities in our field, which will benefit our patients, communities and our profession as a whole.

  40. If you can't find a job within a 5K radius of your house, maybe your being unrealistic about how "flooded" the market actually is. Private career colleges may be 18 months, but this is only a condensed 2 year program, because there are no summer or spring breaks. Many community colleges have shortened days, compared to the private career colleges. Not to mention that many private colleges offer more clinic hours then community colleges, making this idea of a "fast track hygiene course" a ridiculous comment. Let's not forget that many community colleges consider a passing grade as 60%, whereas most private colleges have a minimum requirement of 70%. Looking at the statistics, regarding the NDHCB exam, private colleges as a whole are not ranking any lower than the community colleges and often out performing them. Ultimately, the best hygienist could come from the least reputable school. Your motivation, drive and passion for the profession will dictate your future. Good luck to all the new grads writing the board exam. I look forward to meeting all those who are concentrating on the new developments and possibilities in our field, which will benefit our patients, communities and our profession as a whole.

    • I don't know what you're talking about saying that community colleges have shortened days, I never got out of there before 5pm and sometimes as late as 8pm. Also only 5 schools got a 100% pass rate on NDHCB: Algonquin, Durham, George Brown, Fanshawe and Canadore. You obviously came from a private school. Click this link, then you'll realize how bad those schools really are. http://www.ndhcb.ca/en/exam_results.php

      • Absolutely true! I graduated from a community college 12 years ago. There is a reason they have the reputation that they have. A pass is a 70% not a 60%.
        Radiography is a 90%. Community colleges graduate some of the best dental hygienists…….just ask any employer. Many only hire from a community college that I know for a fact. The proof is in the results from the national board that speaks volumes. The results show how little these dental hygiene students are taught since the national board is really is information that should be easily recalled since you simply regurgitating the info you have learned all year.

  41. Though many hygienists are frustrated with our current situation, I think we must reflect before making quick judgements.. I would hesitate in assuming that all private colleges are the problem, and furthermore, that any of the remaining non-accredited colleges are the same "quality" as those that have closed their doors in recent years. As DH's it is irresponsible to assume the worst without taking the initiative to "look closer."

    Statistically, there are private colleges that are "out performing" the national averages. For example, one of the private colleges in Ontario has consistently tested 10% above the national average on the National Board exam. (May I remind us all, that tests ALL Canadian graduates, regardless of the educational facility) Unfortunately all private colleges and by extension private DH graduates are coloured in the same light. This assumes the worst when as a previous DH mentioned, the best hygienist could come from the least reputable school; with all of this fear mongering, it may be likely.

    .

  42. Though many hygienists are frustrated with our current situation, I think we must reflect before making quick judgements.. I would hesitate in assuming that all private colleges are the problem, and furthermore, that any of the remaining non-accredited colleges are the same "quality" as those that have closed their doors in recent years. As DH's it is irresponsible to assume the worst without taking the initiative to "look closer."

    Statistically, there are private colleges that are "out performing" the national averages. For example, one of the private colleges in Ontario has consistently tested 10% above the national average on the National Board exam. (May I remind us all, that tests ALL Canadian graduates, regardless of the educational facility) Unfortunately all private colleges and by extension private DH graduates are coloured in the same light. This assumes the worst when as a previous DH mentioned, the best hygienist could come from the least reputable school; with all of this fear mongering, it may be likely.

    .

      • these results show how many students pass the exam- NOT the average grades on the exam. My accredited private school has consistently achieved averages in the top 2-5%. The dentist I work for has hired all her hygienists from my school- we must be doing something right. Many private colleges produce quality grads.

    • All private colleges are coloured by the same light because the people graduating from these colleges don’t meet the standards required to get into a community college.  I worked hard all though high school to get the grades for my program whereas these people attending private schools can get in with a 60% average in high school! 

  43. hahahhaha "no blood," what an ignorant comment to make, embarassing absoloutely embarassing.

  44. hahahhaha "no blood," what an ignorant comment to make, embarassing absoloutely embarassing.

    • Watch for upcoming issues of MacLeans as they print that this student was misquoted!!

  45. Might I share that Maxwell College of Advanced Technology, in Belleville, a private college has a 100% pass rate for the NDHCE results. Furthermore, there was only 1 accredited college with the same result, Georgian!

  46. Might I share that Maxwell College of Advanced Technology, in Belleville, a private college has a 100% pass rate for the NDHCE results. Furthermore, there was only 1 accredited college with the same result, Georgian!

    • True story. Can't paint all Colleges with the same brush

    • My friend's wife went there and has nothing good to say about them. Quite a few failed the provincial exam and needed to spend extra money to a refresher type course in TO. Didn't even know how to properly hold their instruments. The college said they were going to be accredited but that was a lie. Trying to money back.

  47. Not very surprised at all!!! So sad that all these new grads especially those who are enrolled, graduating or graduated from DRIVE THRU SCHOOLS only think of the potential income! Let's not forget those patients/clients who should be on top of the priority list. This is the reason why the market is so saturated with DHs who only care about the money but not the patients. I have worked with a few DRIVE THRU GRADS who could not even chart properly and did not know what amalgam was! Not to mention did not know the difference between caries and stain! I work in 3 offices and they refuse to hire DH from any private schools. They have really lowered the standard in this profession! Very, very disappointing!!

  48. Not very surprised at all!!! So sad that all these new grads especially those who are enrolled, graduating or graduated from DRIVE THRU SCHOOLS only think of the potential income! Let's not forget those patients/clients who should be on top of the priority list. This is the reason why the market is so saturated with DHs who only care about the money but not the patients. I have worked with a few DRIVE THRU GRADS who could not even chart properly and did not know what amalgam was! Not to mention did not know the difference between caries and stain! I work in 3 offices and they refuse to hire DH from any private schools. They have really lowered the standard in this profession! Very, very disappointing!!

  49. So true! May I add that we pay so that the public is protected from us!!!

  50. My dentist goes strictly by the “Ontario Dental Association’s” I think that is the name

    so called recommendations once every sixth month for a check up.

    His dental hygienist always first checked the depths of all my gums

    and logged these in her documents she would tell me my gums where not the best.

    Always asked me if I flossed answer NO and I stopped feeling guilty about it.

    He always found something to fix and ruined my back teeth partly by me not

    diligently brushing twice a day (OK so it was my fault too.)

    When I feared that I’d loose my front teeth declined further appointments

    with him but not my DH every fourth month the third appointment in a year with my DH

    she ordered me to do a check up with him even when my teeth were doing fine.

    I booked an appointment with him and he found a loose tooth in the

    back wanted to fix it but I wanted to wait and see _ he let off on that.

    Two more visits to the hygienist and the tooth in the back had to go

    to chicken to pull it out myself I booked appointment with him to do so

    no problem as he had done it often enough for me.

    My insurance surprise _ changed its pay schedule and accepted

    two treatments per DH instead of only one must have noticed

    the fewer dentist charges.

    I have changed to brushing with baking soda using an Oral B

    automatic and brush the required time twice a day with no flossing.

    My teeth are better now since I take care of them.

    Pay for starting DH $23 per hour is sheer extortion

    considering my foul, contaminated and bloody breath.

    rvfw

  51. Your article on Desperate to cut their teeth is not completely accurate. The story implies that the Ontario is pumping out unqualified dental hygienist grads because as you state, “the schools have been able to start training students before passing the quality test”, “barriers to entry are so low” and therefore; “schools started springing up everywhere”.

    Although it is true that there are many unaccredited dental hygiene programs, I would like to clear up any misconceptions.

    No matter what school a dental hygiene graduate has attended they are ALL required to successfully pass the National Dental Hygiene Certification Examination administered by the National Dental Hygiene Certification Board (NDHCB).

    The students that attend a non-accredited school and graduate from that school and want to work in Ontario, are required to successfully pass the Clinical Competency Provincial Accreditation Exam administered by the College of Dental Hygienists of Ontario (CDHO) – the Ontario dental hygiene regulatory college. Students who attend accredited dental hygiene programs in Ontario are exempt from that exam. Continued on next comment space

  52. Your article on Desperate to cut their teeth is not completely accurate. The story implies that the Ontario is pumping out unqualified dental hygienist grads because as you state, “the schools have been able to start training students before passing the quality test”, “barriers to entry are so low” and therefore; “schools started springing up everywhere”.

    Although it is true that there are many unaccredited dental hygiene programs, I would like to clear up any misconceptions.

    No matter what school a dental hygiene graduate has attended they are ALL required to successfully pass the National Dental Hygiene Certification Examination administered by the National Dental Hygiene Certification Board (NDHCB).

    The students that attend a non-accredited school and graduate from that school and want to work in Ontario, are required to successfully pass the Clinical Competency Provincial Accreditation Exam administered by the College of Dental Hygienists of Ontario (CDHO) – the Ontario dental hygiene regulatory college. Students who attend accredited dental hygiene programs in Ontario are exempt from that exam. Continued on next comment space

  53. The CDHO is responsible for ensuring that an applicant meets all the current registration requirements of the CDHO prior to being permitted to register as a dental hygienist in Ontario. The role of the regulatory college is to assure the public that dental hygiene care is safe, ethical, effective and of high quality based on the CDHO Dental Hygiene Standards of Practice and CDHO Code of Ethics. I have been a registered dental hygienist for 28 years and now own my own Independent Dental Hygiene Practice. In Ontario, Bill 171 was passed three years ago allowing self-initiated registered dental hygienists to open their own independent practices. The public has embraced this change because allows them greater access and choice as to where and whom they obtain their oral health care services from.

    Lori Lawrence R.D.H
    Smile Sensations Independent Dental Hygiene Clinic
    Smiths Falls, On

  54. The CDHO is responsible for ensuring that an applicant meets all the current registration requirements of the CDHO prior to being permitted to register as a dental hygienist in Ontario. The role of the regulatory college is to assure the public that dental hygiene care is safe, ethical, effective and of high quality based on the CDHO Dental Hygiene Standards of Practice and CDHO Code of Ethics. I have been a registered dental hygienist for 28 years and now own my own Independent Dental Hygiene Practice. In Ontario, Bill 171 was passed three years ago allowing self-initiated registered dental hygienists to open their own independent practices. The public has embraced this change because allows them greater access and choice as to where and whom they obtain their oral health care services from.

    Lori Lawrence R.D.H
    Smile Sensations Independent Dental Hygiene Clinic
    Smiths Falls, On

  55. In previous comments it is noted that with 12,500 dental hygienists in Ontario, the public is still having trouble with access to care. It is amazing that after 3 years of the law changing to allow RDH's to practice independently….the public still doesn't know that there is a more viable affordable option. My office is extremely busy with people who want great service and an actual relationship with their dental hygienist…..they are not just a number! Success is all about personal care and education. A well informed patient is a satisfied patient.

  56. In previous comments it is noted that with 12,500 dental hygienists in Ontario, the public is still having trouble with access to care. It is amazing that after 3 years of the law changing to allow RDH's to practice independently….the public still doesn't know that there is a more viable affordable option. My office is extremely busy with people who want great service and an actual relationship with their dental hygienist…..they are not just a number! Success is all about personal care and education. A well informed patient is a satisfied patient.

    • Thank you!!

  57. I wrote to Maclean's three years ago to give them a heads up on what is 'really' going on in Ontario. The politics must be too threatening to do the proper investigating that this story really needs. If we want to protect the public we should be looking in a few other closets where the skeletons are hiding!!! Just contact Janet Holmes of the Competition Bureau and she will tell you that there is a lot of documented evidence of 'tide selling' by the DDS's as well as threats to the clients if they go to an independent dental hygienist. Competition is good…especially in such a high price profession. By having a bit of competition the dentists are feeling threatened but it has brought about an affordable option for many Ontarians.

  58. Shame on Erica Alini, and Macleans for publishing such poor reporting. Further investigation was necessary before making the statements that were made in this article.

  59. Shame on Erica Alini, and Macleans for publishing such poor reporting. Further investigation was necessary before making the statements that were made in this article.

    • Very true. Read my comments.

  60. It is certainly evident from both the article and the comments that the full story on dental hygiene practice is filled with misinformation. The economics of supply and demand and the private market influence of dentists to drive supply up and salaries down, the questioning of quality standards, the myth busting of some false impressions of the standards of quality are all valid points and have common threads and yet there are holes in the fabric.

  61. Is the dental hygiene profession being divided by the proliferation of misinformation and a misdirection of resources to the politics of education (private versus public) rather than the emphasis on high standards for any school and any individual that will weed out anyone not qualified to provide care – regardless of their educational background?

    Is the discussion Darwinian in nature? Survival of the fittest? Dentist versus Dental Hygienist? Dental Hygienist versus Dental Hygienist? Every health care provider for themselves? What about the large numbers of people who need better access to care? We aren't short on demand for care, we aren't short on supply of dental hygienists. What we are short on is a health care system that nationally allows dental hygienists to practice to their full scope of knowledge, will compensate dental hygienist providers for delivering much needed oral health care, and recognize just how very important oral health care is to overall health.

  62. It is certainly evident from both the article and the comments that the full story on dental hygiene practice is filled with misinformation. The economics of supply and demand and the private market influence of dentists to drive supply up and salaries down, the questioning of quality standards, the myth busting of some false impressions of the standards of quality are all valid points and have common threads and yet there are holes in the fabric.

  63. I find it interesting that the dental hygienists who took a course from one of these privage programs are being painted as money hungry, when one of the biggest complaints I hear now that the market has been flooded is about the wages being reduced. I have known for a very long time that my high wage was based largely on the fact that my profession had a much higher demand than supply…. the fact that that has changed has not changed my passion for or enjoyment of this profession.

  64. I find it interesting that the dental hygienists who took a course from one of these privage programs are being painted as money hungry, when one of the biggest complaints I hear now that the market has been flooded is about the wages being reduced. I have known for a very long time that my high wage was based largely on the fact that my profession had a much higher demand than supply…. the fact that that has changed has not changed my passion for or enjoyment of this profession.

  65. I hope you know that exploring these "alternative work settings" is quite difficult. When you graduate from school you have minimum $25 000 debt and now can't find traditional employment to pay that off. You expect people with that kind of debt to buy equipment and head up to reserves or rural areas? You also need 2 years of work experience to apply to be self-initiated before you are legally allowed to do that. How could anyone be expected to succeed in this profession with such a difficult start. These private schools need to be shut down. Look at the NDHCB exam results and see which schools have the highest pass rate, the community colleges who have been operating for decades, not the pop-up schools. We are not limiting ourselves, the ministry of training and education has allowed us to be limited by poor regulation.

  66. I don't know what you're talking about saying that community colleges have shortened days, I never got out of there before 5pm and sometimes as late as 8pm. Also only 5 schools got a 100% pass rate on NDHCB: Algonquin, Durham, George Brown, Fanshawe and Canadore. You obviously came from a private school. Click this link, then you'll realize how bad those schools really are. http://www.ndhcb.ca/en/exam_results.php

  67. A passion for people, a passion for perfection and a hard working ethic makes a great health care professional. A good school teaches you the fundamentals and the skills required to be a competent and safe hygienist. Time, patience and a will to learn and strive to be the best you can be makes you a great hygienist. I would also like to say, that the surplus of private schools has been a mockery to the profession…. And yes there is blood, lots of it ,so you better get use to it!

  68. A passion for people, a passion for perfection and a hard working ethic makes a great health care professional. A good school teaches you the fundamentals and the skills required to be a competent and safe hygienist. Time, patience and a will to learn and strive to be the best you can be makes you a great hygienist. I would also like to say, that the surplus of private schools has been a mockery to the profession…. And yes there is blood, lots of it ,so you better get use to it!

  69. A "training program, " as you call it, is where skills and knowledge are acquired. If the foundation is weak, it is very unlikely that the individual will have the base that is required to build upon. If you don't know what you're doing to begin with, the experience you gain in the field is NOT going to make you a better hygienist. You will be a hygienist who is shorting the public by providing unsatisfactory care. A big problem is that the billing will look the same, thereby pleasing the dentist who can now pay a lower wage for that billing.

  70. Thank goodness others are starting to is bring publicity to this issue. It is incredible how quickly our profession has changed in very few years. I don't understand how this day in age such differences in admission requirements and program lengths would ever be allowed. When every other profession out there is adding years of training to their programs, and adding further preprofessional admission requirements before entry into a program, dental hygiene has done just the opposite and taken it to an extreme. Dental assisting has higher standards for prerequisite courses and grades than numerous private hygiene colleges. The job market has absolutely cratered, even in provinces like Alberta where there is only 1 school graduating little over 40 grads. It is really difficult to see the light at the end of the tunnel for hygienists.

  71. Thank goodness others are starting to is bring publicity to this issue. It is incredible how quickly our profession has changed in very few years. I don't understand how this day in age such differences in admission requirements and program lengths would ever be allowed. When every other profession out there is adding years of training to their programs, and adding further preprofessional admission requirements before entry into a program, dental hygiene has done just the opposite and taken it to an extreme. Dental assisting has higher standards for prerequisite courses and grades than numerous private hygiene colleges. The job market has absolutely cratered, even in provinces like Alberta where there is only 1 school graduating little over 40 grads. It is really difficult to see the light at the end of the tunnel for hygienists.

    • The good news is that Dental Hygienists with more than 2yrs of experience are able to apply for Self- Initiation and have their own mobile clinics.
      We are health care providers.The main concern should be bringing dental hygiene services to all Canadians.
      Every Registered Dental Hygienist in Ontario passed the NDHCB exam and furthermore the ones from non accredited school succesfully passed the Clinical Competency Exam performed by CDHO ( Dental Hygiene Regulatory body in Ontario).

    • Agreed. More dh grads. from unaccredited "schools" undermines the credentials and credibility of the dh's who compete/competed for entry to recognized, accredited, reputable dh programs.

      However, the CHDO benefits from an increasing membership and the dentists like it because with a saturated market in dh, they can pay lower wages/salaries and exploit the dh profession as much as ever.

      Perhaps dh's can make a dent in that with their own practises.

  72. So true, if you want proof go to the cdho website <a href="http://www.cdho.org” target=”_blank”>www.cdho.org look at the exam results they are posted compare the results from private schools and community colleges. There is a huge difference often less than half pass the course.
    There is a reason that the community colleges have the reputation that they have. They are the Golden Standard.

  73. There is a huge difference between a graduate from a private and community college. Just ask any employer and they will tell you the same. I have Dental Hygienists at my office that graduated from a community college found work in 3 offices upon graduation and this is recently. Why? Because they graduated from a community college. It has a reputation like no other, it has earned it…..and employers know the quality of the graduate. You may have written the boards yes but it is the application of that knowledge that matters. The community colleges have had the time to work out all the rough spots. They have perfected the program and it shows in the graduates.

  74. Absolutely true! I graduated from a community college 12 years ago. There is a reason they have the reputation that they have. A pass is a 70% not a 60%.
    Radiography is a 90%. Community colleges graduate some of the best dental hygienists…….just ask any employer. Many only hire from a community college that I know for a fact. The proof is in the results from the national board that speaks volumes. The results show how little these dental hygiene students are taught since the national board is really is information that should be easily recalled since you simply regurgitating the info you have learned all year.

  75. I am getting really tired of reading all these ludicrous comments concerning private DH programs. If you consider yourself to be a "REAL" hygienist because of the school you attended, then you should have learned a little something about EVIDENCE-BASED research and critical thinking rather than basing judgement on isolated incidents or internet forums! Shame on you and your ignorance! Many of these schools consistently produce National Board Exam results well above the national average.

  76. In Ontario, students can choose to attend a 2 year Community College program (approx. 9 months each year) or a private school program (18 months with no break). I personally attended a Community College program for half a year (which I did not complete due to serious health issues), and years later decided to attend a private school because it was close to home. In my experience, I actually found the private school had longer days with more structure, as the instructors never cancelled class and they really followed the course outlines. I feel that they provided me with a more solid foundation than the Community College. This was only my personal experience based on my learning style at the two schools I attended. I am by no means saying that private schools are better than Community Colleges- only that accredited private schools provide quality education and are not "dumbing-down" the profession. Their graduates are qualified "REAL HYGIENISTS" registered with the CDHO. The people who seem to be "dumbing-down" the profession are the RDH's posting comments such as these.

  77. The good news is that Dental Hygienists with more than 2yrs of experience are able to apply for Self- Initiation and have their own mobile clinics.
    We are health care providers.The main concern should be bringing dental hygiene services to all Canadians.
    Every Registered Dental Hygienist in Ontario passed the NDHCB exam and furthermore the ones from non accredited school succesfully passed the Clinical Competency Exam performed by CDHO ( Dental Hygiene Regulatory body in Ontario).

  78. these results show how many students pass the exam- NOT the average grades on the exam. My accredited private school has consistently achieved averages in the top 2-5%. The dentist I work for has hired all her hygienists from my school- we must be doing something right. Many private colleges produce quality grads.

  79. First of all, to work either independently or as part of a team, you will come across many different people, all of whom may not share your opinion. I hope with more experience in clinical hygiene and interpersonal skills with individual client's/patient's, you will gain a respect for the Hygienist's that graduated before you. If you stop, take a deep breath rather than using sarcasm and judgement, you'll see that they have a wealth of clinical experience that you have yet to aquire. Ann ally in the same profession makes for the running's of a great Dental Office, good luck!

  80. A shortage of nurses, a shortage of doctors, dentists, a crisis in Canadian human health resources, a lack of funding for public health, prevention and wellness policy and programs for Canadians! This was the cry from each successive witness presenting on Parliament Hill in November to the Standing Committee on Finance.

    As I listened intently to my colleauges in each successive primary health care field, my turn came to present and yes I rallied behind the pressing concerns regarding public health budgeting and spending however I was the anomaly. There was no cry of shortage, quite the opposite; dental hygienists indeed are a profession in healthy supply.

    There are 22,000 Dental Hygienists in Canada all positioned as primary health care providers. Dental Hygienists are caring, passionate, critical thinkers whose scope of practice is built on the pillars of disease prevention and wellness. Dental Hygienists are educated in Canada as inter professional collaborators.

    Dental Hygienists as promoters of wellness are innovative and future oriented. As a united force, Dental Hygienists have enabled the modernization of legislation through grassroots lobbying and have positioned the profession to practice independently and inter-professionally.

    In Canada, the number of independent dental hygiene practitioners and practices are growing exponentially. The service delivery models include Dental Hygienists establishing clinics in community wellness centers, along side and in collaboration with other health care professionals, in long-term care facilities and as mobile practitioners. Canadians who had little or no access to care are now benefiting from the mobility of the profession, many in their own homes. Dental hygienists are on the move!

    Canadians who have never experienced health care with a focus on chronic oral and systemic disease prevention through screening and assessment of disease and subsequent treatment and referral are waking up to this process of care and will demand it as a standard of care for all. The mobilization of Dental Hygienists as preventative specialist is key!

    I look forward to the day when governments and health professions, recognize, support and herald the inter-disciplinary nature of health care. The continuing diversification, mobilization and utilization of Dental Hygienists as primary health care providers benefit all Canadians.

    Dental Hygienists have cut their teeth….they are now ready to chew!

    Palmer Nelson BA (Bio), DDH, RDH

    President
    Canadian Dental Hygienists Association

  81. "Cutting Teeth" article. Tiffany Halioura, dental hygiene student at Aurora College thinks there is no blood in dentall hygiene. What dental hygiene planet are you from? The provincial government's 2005 law to allow 40 private dental hygiene schools to open has ruined dental hygiene. Can we look forward to private nursing schools next.? God help us all. MP, RDH

  82. "Cutting Teeth" article. Tiffany Halioura, dental hygiene student at Aurora College thinks there is no blood in dentall hygiene. What dental hygiene planet are you from? The provincial government's 2005 law to allow 40 private dental hygiene schools to open has ruined dental hygiene. Can we look forward to private nursing schools next.? God help us all. MP, RDH

    • The student was deliberately misquoted. If you feel the spirit of the article, this becomes apparent.

      Please read my other comments.

      Thanks!

    • There are nursing programs that are 2 years in length as opposed to the University programs which provide a degree. Those 2 year programs whether offered through a hospital school of nursing or a community college graduated excellent nurses. I do know that the dental hygiene program at University of Alberta is very hard to get into. The successful candidates have very high marks coming in. What are the entrance requirements for a private program?

    • Watch for upcoming issues of MacLeans where they will print that this student was misquoted

  83. I think it should go back to the old way of getting into the hygiene program.>>>be a dental assistant for one year before becoming a dental hygienist. Really the comment about "no blood", is this person scaling at all? I hope not.

    Say what you want, the majority of them goes into this profession because of the wages not because they want to change or make a differences in people's oral health. That is why some them take the private route.
    I am totally against private colleges. I for one would hire a hygienist from a community college over private one any day.

    Btw, I have been a hygienist over 10 years through a community college.

  84. I think it should go back to the old way of getting into the hygiene program.>>>be a dental assistant for one year before becoming a dental hygienist. Really the comment about "no blood", is this person scaling at all? I hope not.

    Say what you want, the majority of them goes into this profession because of the wages not because they want to change or make a differences in people's oral health. That is why some them take the private route.
    I am totally against private colleges. I for one would hire a hygienist from a community college over private one any day.

    Btw, I have been a hygienist over 10 years through a community college.

    • The student in the article was deliberately misquoted. You may note that the no blood comment was not in quotations and thus not subject to legal recourse. If you assess the wpirit of the article, this becomes apparent.

    • "Old School" is not about being an assistant first it would be going to UofT and going through the degree program….

  85. I couldn't agree more. I attended a University and obtained a degree and was VERY proud of how educated and valued I felt…that is until I moved to Ontario. It is ludicrous here! Half my skills I learned I can't even practise! I find it outright depressing…

  86. I couldn't agree more. I feel bad for those individuals who got "short changed" and attended one of these colleges. In the long run it doesn't pay off and they don't know half of the things those that have graduated from longer, accreditied facilites know. Fact.

  87. Janis,

    Be careful of how fast you are to judge. Hearsay is dangerous, and unless you have experienced what someone else has, then judgement should be withheld. Yes, it is a tight market in Ontario at present, and yes, there are SOME private Colleges that are substandard. They cannot, however, all be painted with the same brush. The substandard
    Colleges are well on the way to extinction, and sadly, so are some of the best ones. Let's not forget that there have been problems found across Canada at some of the long-standing Community Colleges as well. As an instructor, I can safely say that the curriculum and clinical requirements provided at some private Colleges are far superior to what has been offered in years gone by at some Community Colleges. At the end of the day, the employer, staff, and client
    will know which graduates are skilled, knowledgeable and committed regardless of their alma mater. Accrediatation processes are ongoing, and the best will be left standing.

  88. IMPORTANT!! PLEASE READ.

    Let's try to get some perspective on this understandably explosive issue. It is worthy of note that Hygienists feel the job pinch at present. Absolutely. It will take some time for the market to absorb the graduates. This includes those who choose more remote areas in which to practice, and those who choose independent practice over time. At the same time, accreditation is reviewing each College that submits for review. Surely, many will fall, and some (the best) will remain. The flow of graduates will slow. It is now inevitable. Many other graduates will seek alternative geographical areas and styles of practice. Remember, the GTA grows currently by 67,000 people per year. Most of those people will need care. Hygienists will provide it.

  89. THERE'S MORE!!
    Some of the comments discuss the "cheapening" of our profession with all that is going on currently. This is only a perception. However, if we seek to be taken seriously, we should be careful as to how we express ourselves in public forums such as this. Please!!

  90. THERE'S MORE!!
    Some of the comments discuss the "cheapening" of our profession with all that is going on currently. This is only a perception. However, if we seek to be taken seriously, we should be careful as to how we express ourselves in public forums such as this. Please!!

    • It's not a perception, it's a reality! I agree that a public forum is not the most productive place to air the "dirty laundry" of the profession but I really think a lot of hygienists have reached their boiling point and have taken this opportunity to "speak up."

      • What exactly do you mean is a reality?

  91. FINALLY!!
    Ms Alini, as researched, is a well-travelled, respected, experienced, journalist. It is hurtful to our profession (and the eager students of it) that she deliberately misquoted the student named in the article to to suit her intent in writing it. Remember, this one article is bothersome mainly to our profession. The public at large do not have the inside story, and in their larger consciousness, this article is already forgotten.
    Ms. Alini, this article is due for a full rewrite.

  92. FINALLY!!
    Ms Alini, as researched, is a well-travelled, respected, experienced, journalist. It is hurtful to our profession (and the eager students of it) that she deliberately misquoted the student named in the article to to suit her intent in writing it. Remember, this one article is bothersome mainly to our profession. The public at large do not have the inside story, and in their larger consciousness, this article is already forgotten.
    Ms. Alini, this article is due for a full rewrite.

    • How have you come to the conclusion that she was misquoted? I do not see a statement from this student saying she was misquoted.

      • I know her. The article did not put quotes around the no blood comment. The writer was coming from an angle to prove a points and led this student down the garden path

      • watch fortupcoming issues of MacLeans where they will print that the student was misquoted

      • I did reply, check first comment on the first page:)

  93. Thank you!!

  94. Very true. Read my comments.

  95. Thank you Susan. Please read my comments.

  96. Thank you Susan. Please read my comments.

  97. Ms. Nelson,

    Thank you so much.

  98. Ms. Nelson,

    Thank you so much.

  99. The student was deliberately misquoted. If you feel the spirit of the article, this becomes apparent.

    Please read my other comments.

    Thanks!

  100. The student in the article was deliberately misquoted. You may note that the no blood comment was not in quotations and thus not subject to legal recourse. If you assess the wpirit of the article, this becomes apparent.

  101. Don't forget that every dental hygienist can write the board exam up to 4 times if they keep failing(need 65-70%) . And there's a big fee to write it each time$. I think it is too easy. I support a degree as entry to practise for dental hygienists.

  102. Never the less, if you pay you get in. Your previous education may not be a qualifying factor with some of these colleges. Even interviews are done ore the phone, rather than in person.

  103. Regardless, some of the private schools haven't been accredited either. Sorry my previous comment was under wrong reply.

  104. How have you come to the conclusion that she was misquoted? I do not see a statement from this student saying she was misquoted.

  105. It's not a perception, it's a reality! I agree that a public forum is not the most productive place to air the "dirty laundry" of the profession but I really think a lot of hygienists have reached their boiling point and have taken this opportunity to "speak up."

  106. Accreditation does not neccesarily mean the school is providing good education and training. If the minimum bar is met, a sub standard school can still become accredited. The bottom line is whie,l there are some great schools in Ontario, there are also many which are pumping out barely trained hygienists or hygienists who could not get into a better school. Here in BC, people who cannot fulfil the pre requisite courses just go to a private school in Ontario because it is easeir to get into. Then they come back here and are allowed to practice when they are not nearly as qualified. There shouldn't be a loophole for people who can't make the cut to get in here in BC, which will allow them to skirt around BC educational standards. Our market is being destroyed by people who heard hygiene pays well enough, and don't even care about the profession or achieving the highest qualification, and that is a disservice to the patients who pay for care.

  107. Yes we all write the same exam, which tests to the LOWEST common competency across Canada . This is why the praires/BC score much higher pass percentages, they receive more education and there are less private schools. Alot of what we learn (local anesthetic, prescription writing) is not even on the exam, but I would love to see how many private school grads would fare with those questions if they were. It may not be a fluke as you say, but barely making it through is not really much better. It is not a matter of being "intimidated", more displeased at seeing sloppy care, left behind tartar, supra gingival scaling only and people who are unable to educate patients because they are under educated and trained themselves.

  108. Personally I work full time and have since I graduted, so t is not an issue of not being hired, it is an issue of seeing care that is one step above supervised neglect and caring enough and having enough pride in m y profession to want to see substandard practioners be taken out of the market so that the patient receives the care they deserve. Not all Ontario grads or even private school grads are "bad", and I have seen BC grads who are not so great as well, the main message is that the standards for becoming a RDH need to be standardized so any hygienist who is under qualified does not slip through the cracks. Degree as entry to practice should be mandatory. There should be no option to "buy" your way into a profession simply by paying a higher fee adn short cutting around importnat education adn training.

  109. "Old School" is not about being an assistant first it would be going to UofT and going through the degree program….

  110. I agree !!! If she was misquoted why has she not come forward and set things straight. She should since nobody will forget her name or the school that she comes from.

  111. There are nursing programs that are 2 years in length as opposed to the University programs which provide a degree. Those 2 year programs whether offered through a hospital school of nursing or a community college graduated excellent nurses. I do know that the dental hygiene program at University of Alberta is very hard to get into. The successful candidates have very high marks coming in. What are the entrance requirements for a private program?

  112. I know her. The article did not put quotes around the no blood comment. The writer was coming from an angle to prove a points and led this student down the garden path

  113. yes, she should come forward

  114. yes, she should come forward

    • I did reply, check first comment on this page:)

  115. What exactly do you mean is a reality?

  116. I did reply, check first comment on this page:)

  117. Watch the upcoming issues for a letter stating this student has been misquoted. She did stand up and talk to the mag

  118. Watch the upcoming issues for a letter stating this student has been misquoted. She did stand up and talk to the mag

  119. Watch for upcoming issues of MacLeans where they will print that this student was misquoted

  120. watch fortupcoming issues of MacLeans where they will print that the student was misquoted

  121. Watch for upcoming issues of MacLeans as they print that this student was misquoted!!

  122. True story. Can't paint all Colleges with the same brush

  123. NO BLOOD please do us a favour and close that school immediately,

  124. Did you not read my reply to this posting Kim? And you should also know as well that Maclean's will be publishing a letter saying that I was misquoted.

  125. I did reply, check first comment on the first page:)

  126. I'm a Dental Assitant working in BC, and had considered going into hygiene. There are a few private schools that have recently opened up in BC, so our market is getting flooded with new grads as well. Our office placed an ad for a full time hygienist and within 24 hours we had over 100 resumes! All things considered, I am no longer thinking of taking hygiene for fear of not finding a job!!
    My cousin took her hygiene at a local school, she was the first class to graduate from the new hygiene program. She failed her national exam TWICE!! She couldn't get her license in BC until she passed. Somehow she managed to send in for a license in Manitoba (because she did have a valid diploma). Because she had a valid lozenge from another province, she was able to transfer to a BC license and is currently practicing! Doesn't make sense to me! I definatley do not want her cleaning my teeth seeing how she has never passed the national exam!! Makes me wonder how she was able to get a license!!

  127. I'm a Dental Assitant working in BC, and had considered going into hygiene. There are a few private schools that have recently opened up in BC, so our market is getting flooded with new grads as well. Our office placed an ad for a full time hygienist and within 24 hours we had over 100 resumes! All things considered, I am no longer thinking of taking hygiene for fear of not finding a job!!
    My cousin took her hygiene at a local school, she was the first class to graduate from the new hygiene program. She failed her national exam TWICE!! She couldn't get her license in BC until she passed. Somehow she managed to send in for a license in Manitoba (because she did have a valid diploma). Because she had a valid lozenge from another province, she was able to transfer to a BC license and is currently practicing! Doesn't make sense to me! I definatley do not want her cleaning my teeth seeing how she has never passed the national exam!! Makes me wonder how she was able to get a license!!

  128. I never said anything about "no blood" I just said the duties of a dental hygienist are not as invasive as the duties of a surgeon or Dentist. It's pretty sad that this was edited as me saying "no blood" and should be an embarrassment to the magazine itself for printing out such false information.

    P.S. Notice how the words 'A job in the health sector with flexible hours and no handling of blood is a dream' aren't in quotation marks, which should also point out that those aren't the words I said.

  129. In Alberta hygienists practice to the full scope of their knowlede- if they can start up their own practice or are lucky enough to get a coveted public health position. The nature of working as a clinical dental hygienist in a traditional dental practice is not conducive, in most cases, to practicing within one's full scope of knowledge. Please tell me what you think the Canadian health care system can do to solve the work-shortage problem? I'm guessing that if hygienists were better equipped to get out there and deliver the much needed oral health care to the people who need better access to it, they would. I have been trying to figure out the nature of this problem for a while now and would love to hear some solutions proposed. I'm getting tired of hearing complaints. Hygienist's need to present a strong voice now!

  130. In Alberta hygienists practice to the full scope of their knowlede- if they can start up their own practice or are lucky enough to get a coveted public health position. The nature of working as a clinical dental hygienist in a traditional dental practice is not conducive, in most cases, to practicing within one's full scope of knowledge. Please tell me what you think the Canadian health care system can do to solve the work-shortage problem? I'm guessing that if hygienists were better equipped to get out there and deliver the much needed oral health care to the people who need better access to it, they would. I have been trying to figure out the nature of this problem for a while now and would love to hear some solutions proposed. I'm getting tired of hearing complaints. Hygienist's need to present a strong voice now!

  131. I respect that you came on here to defend yourself. If you were misqouted as you say, then Macleans should clarify that.

    There are MANY hygienists who are very upset at the direction this profession has taken in the last few years and an article like this really gets us riled up. Best of luck to you as you complete your studies.

  132. The magazine is. They are writing a retraction.

  133. It has been denied accreditation at least twice….go figure!

  134. The CDHO and the ON government are both to blame for this situation. (I worked as a dh for 20 years, trained in a 2 year program at the U of Manitoba, came to work in ON in the 90's.)
    I could see in 2005, with the private schools opening and the only entry criteria being money, that there were going to be huge problems in the dh field. I resigned this year from the CDHO and am glad of it.
    The CDHO has claimed it had no control over what was happening. The college should not have allowed the private school grads. to write the exams nor issued registration numbers to any of them. The CDHO boasts of it 's evergrowing memberships nos. in Milestones all the time. Why? It justifies their existence to the gov't, protects their jobs and most of all the lucrative fees from membership and the professional portfolio. It's all about money and politics under the guise of the public good.

  135. The fact is many who belong to the CDHO also have high positions in the Private Schools (hmmm isn't that a conflict of interest?), maybe this is why the CDHO has allowed these Private schools to flourish?

  136. The fact is many who belong to the CDHO also have high positions in the Private Schools (hmmm isn't that a conflict of interest?), maybe this is why the CDHO has allowed these Private schools to flourish?

  137. I didn't think there was anything wrong with what you said nor how McLeans wrote. It just said to me that the position is not as 'messy' as many other positions in the Health Sector.

  138. Respectably Palmer Nelson, what do your comments have to do with the article?

    Save your "speech" for the necessary time.

  139. Respectably Palmer Nelson, what do your comments have to do with the article?

    Save your "speech" for the necessary time.

  140. Agreed. More dh grads. from unaccredited "schools" undermines the credentials and credibility of the dh's who compete/competed for entry to recognized, accredited, reputable dh programs.

    However, the CHDO benefits from an increasing membership and the dentists like it because with a saturated market in dh, they can pay lower wages/salaries and exploit the dh profession as much as ever.

    Perhaps dh's can make a dent in that with their own practises.

  141. Is Dr. Susan Ziebarth a dentist? And also a practising dental hygienist?

  142. Is Dr. Susan Ziebarth a dentist? And also a practising dental hygienist?

  143. Totally agree with susan.

    Very true.

  144. My friend's wife went there and has nothing good to say about them. Quite a few failed the provincial exam and needed to spend extra money to a refresher type course in TO. Didn't even know how to properly hold their instruments. The college said they were going to be accredited but that was a lie. Trying to money back.

  145. Exactly Tamara. It is an extremely invasive treatment that we provide and blood is part of the inflammatory process.

  146. I'd like to know why the amount I pay for a cleaning hasn't gone down? If these dental hygienists are accepting less money and salaries have gone, why does the fee for my 4 month cleanings keep going up?

  147. I'd like to know why the amount I pay for a cleaning hasn't gone down? If these dental hygienists are accepting less money and salaries have gone, why does the fee for my 4 month cleanings keep going up?

  148. How many of you have written to MacLeans about this article?

  149. Wow….no handling of blood???Are you serious? This is the issue with Dh grads now. They have no idea what the job really is.

  150. Dental hygiene not having to work with blood… HAHAHAHAH.!!
    Another quality article by Macleans. Living on controversy.
    Goes to show how amateur journalism bends with the intention they want to give a story and contrive a nice closing contradictory remark rather than stick to the facts…
    or the student was seriously misquoted
    or completely off her rocker.
    Gum disease is a messy thing! You don’t want to go to a Oral hygienist that thinks there is no blood involved in her profession and the journalist should do some homework and actually find out what oral/dental hygienists do before writing opinions.

  151. Dentists tightly control number of dentists graduates.
    New dental schools are needed but none open.
    Dentists regulate dental hygienists through government.
    Dentists govern what hygienists can or cant’t do.
    Dentists max profit by minimizing pay to staff and fixing teeth.
    Dentists open drive through schools.

    Do you see the trend here?

    Dental hygienists can single handedly increase the level of health in this and any other country. That is their job; preventative health care at its best.

    Dental hygiene can eliminate a large percentage of this or any country’s health care costs without needing public funding. The only requirement is to be let free to truly self regulate and practice independently of dentists. Have general practitioners replace dentist if it is the medical opinion and care that is important. Dentists have a clear and pervasive conflict of interests with eliminating caries and the need for dental disease, they make their living from it.

    Imagine a Canada with less oral disease, more hygienists, less dentist, less cost of health care…wait…you are imagining northern Europe as it is today. Smart, strategically reducing health care costs rather than perpetuating the medical establishment. If this happens and there is less gum disease, cavities and consequently less systemic conditions like heart conditions and diabetes and guess what? Dentist will be out of work fixing cavities and pulling teeth and root canals.

    Think of incentives. What are dentist incentives? What are hygienist incentives and should one govern the other or should they operate independently?
    Read the book ‘Freakonomics’ and apply it to this situation. What commonly accepted and assumed to be beneficial is often quite the opposite.

  152. Ah, I just have this basic question: “Would you go to college or university for dental hygiene program?” I’m debating..help me out!

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