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It’s like a curse

New findings offer a bleak outlook for redheads everywhere


 

It’s like a curseRed is the hair colour of the season. In fashion magazines worldwide, crimson clichés abound: Hollywood has succumbed to “scarlet fever” and starlets are “painting the town red.” Model Coco Rocha and actress Scarlett Johansson are two of the latest to turn red. But they are only following in the wake of faux-red trailblazers like Amy Adams, who swears there was “a definite shift in [her] life” the moment she “decided to go red.”

Hollywood stylist Robert Hallowell—whose latest gig involves keeping CSI star Marg Helgenberger’s copper hair shining on set—cautions that, of all the bottle-bought shades, red is the most finicky. “It’s so hard to get it right,” he bemoans. “It can be so I Love Lucy orange. Or it can go to the bluey, dark red that is sort of ’80s.” That, of course, is not a problem for the two per cent of the world that is genuinely red. But while Hollywood is turning more titian-friendly, another place appears increasingly threatening to redheads: the dentist’s chair.

According to a recent study, redheads are twice as likely to avoid the dentist as people with other hair colours. The discovery, says Daniel Sessler, chair of outcomes research at the Cleveland Clinic, began with “a persistent urban legend in the anaesthesia community that redheads were difficult to anaesthetize.” Curious, Sessler decided to test that claim. His findings reinforced what dentists had thought to be mere folklore: that redheads require “a statistically significant” extra dose of general anaesthesia to get the same pain relief as a blond or brunette (20 per cent more). The same proved true for local anaesthesia. But the final step was applying those discoveries to the world of dental care. It was no surprise, says Sessler, to find that redheads are “considerably more anxious about going to the dentist,” where local anaesthetics are commonplace—so anxious that many opt out of going entirely. “Redheads are more sensitive than other people to certain kinds of pain,” Sessler affirms.

Jeffrey Mogil, professor of pain research at McGill University, disputes Sessler’s claim. He argues that redheads are in fact more sensitive to anaesthetics and less sensitive to pain. The diverging conclusions may reflect the different ways in which pain was measured. The hapless redheads in Sessler’s research were exposed to thermal pain; Mogil used electric shock. But the discrepancy does not negate a consequential finding: that red hair has something to do with pain sensitivity in the first place.

Red hair usually results from a mutation of the MC1R gene, on chromosome 16. The mutation can go unexpressed for generations, but when two mutant genes collide—one from each parent—red hair is forged. The idea that these mutant genes may be a problem in the domain of pain is one of a series of new findings that offer a bleak outlook for redheads everywhere. This summer, an Australian study linked red hair to Tourette’s syndrome, a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder that results in motor and vocal tics. Hair colour may also influence marital status: Sessler found divorce to be more common in redheads—an observation that he warns could be “spurious.” But no claim heralds the grim fate of the redhead more clearly than the one made by the Oxford Hair Foundation: that, in 100 years, they will be all but extinct.

It’s a prediction that might be welcomed in some parts of the world: notably the U.K., where a virulent discrimination against redheads—known as “Gingerism”—persists. This uniquely British brand of bigotry has existed for generations; as the old English proverb goes: “Do not let the shadow of a redheaded person fall upon you. It might give you bad luck.” But it rose to the fore in 2003, when a 20-year-old was stabbed in the back because of his red hair—an event the BBC described as the first “serious anti-red-hair hate crime.” It was news again in 2007, after a family of six gingers in Newscastle claimed they had to move homes five times because of hair-colour-related abuse. In the midst of it all, the BBC asked: “Is gingerism as bad as racism?” (The article opened with a joke. “What’s the difference between a terrorist and a redhead?” “You can negotiate with a terrorist.”)

Indeed, the intolerance holds a surprisingly visible place in British society. A few years ago, Conservative MP Patrick Mercer sought to defend racial name-calling in the military. His apology: “A chap with red hair, for example, would also get a hard time. A far harder time than a black man, in fact.” (Mercer was later dropped by his party.)

Some say the precarious position of the U.K. redhead is linked to the old, atavistic hostility between the English and Scots and Irish. They claim that red hair to some signals a Celtic background (up to 13 per cent of Scots are redheads and up to 10 per cent of the Irish have red hair). But even in Canada, a Vancouver teen made headlines last year after starting a “Kick a Ginger Day” campaign on Facebook—inspired by a South Park episode in which there is an uprising against redheads. On the announced day, a number of children were beaten up by pupils, and dozens were sent home from school.

A few years ago, author Marion Roach went on a two-year journey to discover the origin of these preconceptions—a journey which culminated in a book: The Roots of Desire: The Myth, Meaning, and Sexual Power of Red Hair. “I’ve had historians tell me that the Vikings started it,” she says. “Because the Vikings, many with red hair, raped and pillaged their way across the U.K.” But she admits that notion is hard to trace. “But what I did find is that in every culture, at some point in history, there’s been a fear and a hatred of redheads.” Judas, the Biblical figure who betrayed Jesus, started being painted with red hair in the ninth century. And Shakespeare had his villains don red wigs. But the most “stunning” display, says Roach, is captured in a mural of Adam and Eve at London’s St. Paul’s Cathedral: “Eve, when she’s happy and frolicking, her hair is gold. And when she’s getting thrown out of the garden, when all you see is God’s large arms directing her out, she’s cowering under the weight of her long, red hair.”

Scientists used to think that red hair emerged when Homo sapiens arrived in Europe 40,000 years ago. But then in 2007, DNA retrieved from Neanderthals suggested that at least some were redheads. That means the ginger gene could be over 100,000 years old. What this shows is that red hair may once have conferred a biological advantage. Notably, redheads can produce high concentrations of vitamin D under low light conditions, something that helped ward off rickets in light-deprived northern Europe. Jonathan Rees, who discovered the red hair gene, argued that for it to have thrived, red hair must have been a desired trait.

What’s clear is that an interest in red hair—the science, history and aesthetics—is in vogue. This winter, Charlotte Rushton will publish Ginger Snaps, a photo collection of redheads. For the U.K.-born, red-haired photographer, the publication will be a sort of vindication. Rushton says that growing up, she was subjected to a relentless stream of taunting—or “ginger-baiting”—which “bordered on molestation.” Moving to California, she was astonished to learn “Americans love red hair!”

Redheads, in turn, are riding this wave. The icing on the cake was this summer’s fifth annual Redhead Day in Breda, Holland. The celebration, with 3,000 gingers, was organized by Bart Rouwenhorst, an energy consultant and amateur artist—and a blond. “So many people came to this event,” he explained, because “people with red hair feel related to other people with red hair.” Popular events on the day included: a fashion show with 50 red-haired models, lectures on red hair science and a group photo shoot.

And about that pesky problem of imminent extinction? A host of pro-red websites have sprung up. “Sav[ing] the Redheads,” outlines Redhedd.com, is “a two-step process, and imperialistic to the very core. The first step is to intramarry. The second is to intermarry.” But what spurred this new fetish? Boredom among the Hollywood elite, perhaps. Marion Roach has a different idea: “We’re just much more comfortable with powerful women than we ever have been.” The quintessential sass-talking redhead, Roach says, is “the ultimate representation of the powerful woman.” Now, with any hope, redheads will be around long enough to enjoy this new-found veneration.


 

It’s like a curse

  1. ….red heads!!!…quite possibly a genetic predisposition such as other fine features…scientifically speaking but red, blondes, brunettes, whatever they are what they are and ya gotta love them…all…

  2. Boy…. good thing my hair is grey (well, let's say a kind of balding peppery grey).

  3. I don't think this is true. In the Bekka valley in Lebanon there are many Arabs with red hair. This is one of the legacies of the Crusaders who took Arab wives.

    While the blonde hair they might've bestowed died out shortly the red hair and gold-brown eyes has persisted for over 500 years.

    Often there is black and red haired individuals within the same family.

  4. BS… the subtitle says "bleak outlook for redheads", and page 2 says "DNA retrieved from Neanderthals suggested that at least some were redheads". Explain to me how a genetic disposition that has been around for so long would suddenly be in danger of extinction. I have red hair and hope my children do too, what I once considered a curse in school has proven to be a unique trait that sets me apart. My brother and his wife have brown hair, yet their new daughter has red hair… the gene can skip around, that's why it's called a mutation… a mutation that I am proud to carry. The research cited in this article (notably from the Oxford Hair Foundation which is owned by Proctor and Gamble) is bogus, junk science used to sell hair colour in supermarkets. Should I write an article for MacLeans that claims ALL blonds are imbeciles? Or all brunettes are evil? I can make up "research" with the best of them.

  5. i have three daughters (same father for each) One is a brunette the other is blond and the third has beautiful flaming red hair. This is repeated in the grandkids. love them all.

    • Redhair is a result of a rogue gene and is very unpredictable. I am the only redhead in three generations although there is a hint that a great, great grandmother might have had red hair. I doubt that we will go extinct but as people of the world interact more and more (which is not a bad thing) it is less likely that those carrying the gene (even if they themselves are not redheads) will meet and marry – unlike 100 years ago where you met and married in the same community or couple of communities.

  6. Are you kidding me. This article was ridiculus. And yes…..I am a redhead. As a child I woukld get made fun of but now I have people complimenting my hair all the time and I myself love it. First they attack the blondes, referring to them as stupid. Wow, must not have had anything else intelligent to write about.
    Also, as a redhead, I can perscervier pain, I read you whole article didn't I?

  7. Dear Ms. Englehart: I realize that you are probably very busy. However, if it's okay, I'd like to share a few coincidences. I was born in the town of Englehart in Northern Ontario. I have red hair, as did my grandmother. My mother, sister, aunt & uncle have red hair also. I have two daughters; both have red hair. My youngest is named Katie. I intend to read the book by Marion Roach. Thank you for your interesting article.

  8. Dear Ms. Engelhart: I am so sorry. I just noticed that your name is not spelled the same as my home town. Mea culpa. P.S. In the on-line poll regarding Afghanistan, there is a typo. Reinforces is written as reinforcmes.

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