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Is pickup artist Julien Blanc a threat to women?

The call to keep a pickup artist out of Canada stokes flames feminists want to extinguish


 
ttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/relationships/11235739/Is-Julien-Blanc-really-the-worst-pickup-artist.html

Twitter

About a year ago I was walking through the Eaton Centre mall in downtown Toronto when a teenage boy approached me and asked me very meekly if he could have a few minutes of my time. I said sure, assuming that he was working for a charity and hadn’t had much luck attracting donors during rush hour in the dead of winter. (I did a similar, soul-crushing job in college.) I waited for his pitch about poverty, child soldiers or land mines, but it never came. Instead, he told me how “cool” my glasses were and asked me if I had a boyfriend. It became instantly clear that he didn’t want a donation; he wanted a date. I told him I was a lesbian in a hurry (my go-to exit strategy with street preachers) and I was soon on my way—confused about why a teenage boy would so boldly pursue a four-eyed woman in a ski jacket 10 years his senior, but flattered nonetheless.

It wasn’t until the next morning that I realized my age and attire were irrelevant to the equation, because my adolescent suitor didn’t have eyes for me; he had eyes for literally any woman with a pulse. According to multiple news outlets, Toronto’s biggest downtown shopping mall had recently become ground zero for so-called pickup artists (PUAs as they are known online), a loosely connected international community of guys who share seduction tips with each other on the Internet and take to the streets to “woo” as many unsuspecting women as humanly possible. Their techniques range from corny (showering women with compliments) to cruel: “Negging,” a PUA technique popularized by American pickup artist and journalist Neil Strauss in his 2005 book, The Game, consists of showering women with low-grade insults. According to Urban Dictionary, “negs” are “meant to undermine the self-confidence of a woman so she might be more vulnerable to your advances.” (An example, used frequently by my own grandmother: “Wow, you have beautiful eyes. It’s a shame I can barely see them behind your bangs.”)

The Eaton Centre, obviously displeased with the fact that some of its female shoppers were being subjected to this bizarre breed of socially awkward male interference, issued a statement on Twitter alerting customers about the PUA presence on its premises. “Rest assured security is briefed and your health and safety are our top priority,” mall staff tweeted before Christmas last year.

The pickup artist who tried and failed to woo me on account of my cool glasses was, as far as I could tell, a threat to nobody’s health and safety. In fact, I felt a little sorry for the guy. Spending one’s free time trying to engage strangers romantically in a shopping mall doesn’t merely reveal an absence of social grace, but quite possibly, an absence of friends.

But it is no longer socially acceptable to pity the PUAs, because they are apparently—in these socially divisive, Ghomeshi-saturated times—a viable threat to the feminist cause. That cause has been active against the PUA culture, and has borne fruit. For example, Julien Blanc, the 25-year-old pickup artist of the PUA organization Real Social Dynamics—and author of such promotional gems as: “Develop panty-dropping masculinity with this rock-solid structure to self-generate the powerful emotions girls crave”—was banned from Australia this month on the grounds that his dating seminars (for which he charges more than $1,000) incite violence against women. Several petitions asking the Canadian government to bar Blanc from entering Canada are in the works here too; the outcry against him has been so strong on Twitter that Canadian Immigration Minister Chris Alexander issued a statement on the social media platform last week condemning the pickup artist’s teachings, and ensuring the public that his office is “looking at all options and will consider using every tool at our disposal to protect the rule of law on Canadian soil.”

What’s gotten the Twitterverse so exercised about Blanc is the implicit misogyny in some of his social media offerings lately. These have included a recent post of Blanc with his arms around a woman’s throat followed by the hashtag #ChokingGirlsAroundtheWorld. (Blanc claimed in an apology on CNN this week that he was only joking around when he took this photo.) There is also a video of the pickup artist boasting to a room of young men about walking down the streets of Tokyo, pushing women’s heads into his crotch against their will. (Later he’s shown actually attempting this in what appears to be a nightclub. The women involved look mostly confused.) There is no doubt that some of Blanc’s behaviour, unlike the merely corny techniques employed by my own pickup artist—constitutes sexual harassment. But Blanc, while odious, isn’t a dangerous ideologue. A dangerous ideologue was former Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad stepping, unaccosted, onto American soil in 2007, where he gave a speech at Columbia University.

Blanc, by comparison, is a sophomoric ass so blatantly trolling the feminist community with idiotic rape jokes and a following that is insignificant in comparison to the number of people speaking out against him. He has 8,200 Twitter followers; the petition to have him barred from entering the U.K. just reached 150,000. In other words, he isn’t Hitler. He’s Stifler. Which makes the current media blitz he’s enjoying all the more annoying. The most ironic thing about Blanc’s notorious hashtag is that the vast majority of people who appear to be using it are feminists. (I searched the hashtag and scrolled down the results for roughly 25 minutes trying to find one tweet that championed the sentiment rather than derided it. I failed.) Were it not for the scores of women using it in their posts to denounce Blanc, it would likely cease to exist.

It appears that out of a laudable and deeply felt outrage at a potential injury to women, some in the feminist movement have amplified exactly the misogynistic messages they’d like to snuff out. They’ve effectively become Julien Blanc’s spokeswomen, his PR firm. Kirsty Mac, a feminist and stand-up comic whose activism was instrumental in the decision to ban Blanc from Australia, disagrees with this idea wholeheartedly. “Australia said no to violence against women and the world followed,” Mac wrote to me in an email. “Social media might very well be the beginning of the end of the misogyny in pop culture.”

It is certainly the beginning of the end of nuance. Feminist causes have exploded on Twitter in the last year, from #YesAllWomen (the viral hashtag that emerged in the wake of misogynist murderer Elliot Rodger’s violent rampage in May) to #BeenRaped­NeverReported, the infinitely powerful and informative viral hashtag that emerged in the wake of the sexual assault allegations against former CBC host Jian Ghomeshi in October. The social media movement against “street harassment” (a.k.a. cat calling) is just as lively. So too, whether we like or not, is the backlash against the Rosetta mission scientist Matt Taylor who wore a tasteless shirt on TV during the live broadcast of the comet landing, emblazoned with hundreds of miniature pictures of semi-nude ladies; a problematic message, many argued, in an industry that employs so few women.

These conversations are overdue. Yet the downside to their playing out on social media is the lightning speed at which online feminism has amalgamated sexist offenses of wildly varying severity—pickup artistry, cat-calling, date rape—into one melting pot of equivalency. The result is that the difference between what’s idiotic, what’s lecherous, and what’s criminal is lost.

This is the hapless kind of false equivalency that has infected so many worthy social movements and reduced their stature, with moral persuasion replaced by ideological bullying. The greatest heresy is for anyone, male or female, to suggest that there might be another side to the story—like, for instance, Brandon Thomas, an 18-year-old self-styled pickup artist who lives in Tulsa, Okla., who told me he was virtually friendless before he got involved with the PUA community two years ago. “I had no idea how awkward I was . . . Parents and friends tell you what you want to hear,” he said. “A dating coach tells you what you need to hear.” (He claims that every PUA technique he uses is imbued with respect for women.)

Not all pickup artists are equal; and very few of them are the spawn of the devil. (Most, I suspect, are merely virgins.)

It is profoundly important for both its relevancy and survival that feminism retain the ability to distinguish between the handsy jerk who pushes his luck on the dance floor, and a man who allegedly assaults women in the presence of a stuffed bear.

And then, to judge them accordingly.


 

Is pickup artist Julien Blanc a threat to women?

  1. It’s rather refreshing to find a feminist with some level of self awareness. Don’t talk too much about it, it’s preferably that the feminist loons continue as they are.

  2. Free speech is the ability soy SAY Anything with out being Censored………..

  3. There is no equivalency being drawn between these men they are just all be rejected. Rape culture is a threat to women. Julien Blanc was here to promote his views not just visit as a private citizen. Letting businesses know that they will have picketers out front if they promote this man’s views is the reason for free speech. He is free to promote his views. We are free to denounce them.

    It is certainly not doing confused young men a favor by allowing this man to promote sexual harassment as a means of acquiring sexual services.

  4. The world is getting overly serious and are mixing things up. While there will always be sexual aggressors out there, why do people have to draw negative references with the pick up artists?? This world is soon becoming a REALLY boring world!

    The whole idea behind all these Pick up Artists are simply trying different ways to get women attention and to impress them. People have different tastes, if a person is not impress by the way or the style of the “pick up artist”, they will simply reject the pick up artist anyway. There are people who like to look for people who are not BORING but fun and unpredictable like those pick up artists.

    If we start censoring every single unique fun way for men to express their affections (e.g. Eaton Centre “..alerting customers about the PUA presence on its premises..”), honestly, at the end of the day, if we start suppressing everything, it is the women who will have less and less fun encounters anyway and all they would left with are those boring males with all the same ways to approach women.

    Nowadays men are finding less and less unique way to draw the female’s attention if we continue to censor and ban everything, we will all live in the book of 1984, where censorship and security of the society take total control, even over people’s emotions!

    And don’t forget, in the reality we are living in today, majority of the time, male is still expect to be the gender to make their first move to begin with anyway. Given this underling fact, not surprise there will be higher chance for female to find a male Pick up Artist annoying or overly aggressive than a male being annoyed by another female’s approach.

    If you aren’t that interested with a particular random stranger, it is so much easy to be annoyed by that person to begin with anyway! No matter how that person tried impress you.

    Also, how about let the women try their first move to impress men? See how they will play it out?

    Lastly, if people start thinking negatively about “pick up artist”, we may as well ban all the love stories written by Shakespeare’s in school as well. Because if you think of it, many of the male characters in the stories written by Shakespeare, resemblance many of the elements of these Pick up Artists.

    e.g. Romeo, having a depression at the beginning of the story because of an unrequited infatuation for a girl, Rosaline; sneaked into a ball without being invited in the hope of meeting Rosaline but instead fell in love by first sight to Juliet, then after the ball, sneaked into the garden outside of Juliet’s bedroom and climbed up into her room and started kissing with her…

    Come on, people, if the girl likes you, even you are mentally depressed, crashing into a party to see another girl of your dream and a stalker by today’s definition, the girl will still kiss you and die with you eventually… How romantic~!

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