Summer Getaways: Nova Scotia

Taste, the adventure

Summer Getaways: Nova Scotia - Taste, the adventure

Nova Scotian seafood spectacular (Adventures in Taste)

Southwest Nova Scotia
From the Fundy Shore and Annapolis Valley that overlook the Bay of Fundy, home of the world’s highest tides, to the Acadian shores and South Shore on the Atlantic Ocean, this historic region welcomed English and French explorers 400 years ago and is now famous for its lighthouses, winding coastal roads, lush rolling fields and quaint fishing villages. Another of its great attractions: some of the best seafood, including the world-famous Digby scallops, a pickled fish pâté called Solomon Gundy, and lobster—lots of lobster. After you’re done indulging, the area is a great destination for camping and cycling, as well as bird and whale watching.

Adventures in Taste
Looking for some adventure and want to thrill your taste buds? Then take a kayak trip to a secluded cove in the Bay of Fundy and stop to enjoy a giant feast, or head out on the Atlantic Ocean to watch humpback whales in scenic Mahone Bay in the morning before touring a winery in the afternoon. If you want less of an adventure but still crave an unforgettable culinary experience, Adventures in Taste offers tours to farmers’ markets, specialty food shops, wineries and breweries—including North America’s only single malt whisky distillery at the Glenora Distillery in Glenville, Cape Breton.

Canadian Navy Centennial Celebrations
To celebrate the 100-year anniversary of Canada’s naval forces, activities are planned across the country this summer, and Halifax will be front and centre. Highlights in and around the city include International Fleet Review Week (June 28-July 2), a showcase of ships from around the world in Halifax Harbour that will be open to visitors, and the Naval Centennial Ball at the World Trade Convention Centre in early August. A navy-themed travelling road show will also feature musical performances and an exhibition of naval artifacts and art.

Cape Breton Island
It’s no surprise that Travel + Leisure ranked Cape Breton Island third in its world ranking of top islands last year, and the No. 1 island in North America. There’s the stunning Cabot Trail that winds around the Cape Breton Highlands down the Margaree River and along Bras d’Or Lake, Lobsterpalooza (May 15-July 1), Hike the Highlands Festival (Sept. 10-19), and the Celtic Music Interpretive Centre in Judique, where visitors can take part in fiddle lessons and traditional ceilidh sessions that feature folk music and dancing.

SummerFest (June 30-July 4)
The Island’s newest festival has something for every member of the family. For the younger kids, there’s a petting zoo, performances by the Doodlebops (a pre-school musical favourite), and a Swash Buckler Pirate Zone that features a haunted house. For teens, there’s the the Fringe Urban Zone with daily skateboard and BMX competitions. There’s a three-on-three hockey tournament on a synthetic ice surface, as well as the West Coast Lumberjack Show complete with log rolling. Plus a unique Cirque du Soleil performance that can only be seen in Charlottetown. In fact, Cirque signed a three-year contract this year to play at SummerFest. If you can’t make it to the show, you can catch Cirque du Soleil performers on Great George Street for free.

To see what Linden MacIntyre picks as his favourite spots, go to Where famous Canucks go to play

For more information on events and travel in Nova Scotia, see www.novascotia.com




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Summer Getaways: Nova Scotia

  1. That last paragraph ("SummerFest") is about Prince Edward Island.

  2. Great list of Nova Scotia activities. We'd also encourage people to visit Chedabucto Bay, the largest bay on the Nova Scotia Atlantic coast with more than 600 kilometres of shoreline to explore. Visit http://www.authenticseacoast.com/play to get a guide to 101 things to do on Chedabucto Bay as well as seasonal Top 10 lists of the best things to do in spring, summer and fall.

  3. It just might be a good idea to get someone to write your material that is a little for familiar with the province. Or at least a person with some knowledge of the geography of the East Coast. Very little substance in the content (although not badly written). And..oh..Nova Scotia is not an island, but Prince Edward Island is. If I were you I would be a little embarrassed with this..

    • You might want to consider the fact that the information, as noted in the article, came from the Nova Scotia's tourism board. Perhaps you should write them a letter and complain.

  4. I love the time I have spent in Nova Scotia… It is such and amazing place!

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