Inside the Canada Science and Technology Museum's big renovation - Macleans.ca
  0

Inside the Canada Science and Technology Museum’s big renovation


 

In 2014, the Canadian Science and Technology Museum was closed after mould was discovered in the walls, and officials determined the building’s leaky, asbestos-infested roof was at risk of collapse. After extensive repairs and renovations, the museum is set to re-open on Nov. 17.  Photographer Blair Gable was given behind-the-scenes access to the museum as workers prepare for the big unveiling.

Museum tour guides build and race cars in the ZOOOM - Children's Innovation Zone at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Photograph by Blair Gable An 8,000 sq. ft. space for children two to eight years of age, this gallery is composed of nine circle-themed modules providing opportunities for play and experimentation. At its heart is the spirit of innovation that drives discovery. The gallery will feature elements of surprise and experimentation including a designated toddler area in close proximity to a family room, an interactive gear wall, a building station with over-sized foam blocks, a multi-sensorial play structure where children can run, a vehicle building station and test ramp, a light and sound console, and wind vortex with a large circular path and animated features.

Museum tour guides build and race cars in the ZOOOM gallery, a section of the museum dedicated to introducing children to the world of innovation (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Tom Everrett, Curator of Communications, and Derek Brousseau, artifact handler and mount maker, assemble a display in the Sound By Design exhibit at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. The gramophone is a Berliner GT and it is a particularly beautiful example of tabletop gramophones from this period (c. 1910). It was manufactured by Emile Berliner's company in Montreal (Emile Berliner invented the gramophone, or disc-based record player, in 1887), and the GT remains one of the most iconic of Berliner's designs. You can find a similarly-styled tabletop gramophone on top of every Grammy Award, which are named after the gramophone in recognition of its lasting contribution to the recording industry. Sound by Design explores the relationship between sound technology and human experience through the lens of design. Visitors will encounter a variety of sound and music technologies from the last 150 years, which provide opportunities for reflection on the influence of these technologies in our lives today. (Photograph by Blair Gable)

Tom Everrett, curator of communications, and Derek Brousseau, artifact handler and mount maker, assemble a display in the Sound By Design exhibit. (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Paul Bown, vice-president and volunteer with Bytown Railway Society, washes the exterior of a Canadian Pacific locomotive at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. On the left (green) is Canadian National Railways locomotive 6400 (CN 6400), which is the best example of a Canadian-designed streamlined steam locomotive. It was something of a mechanical celebrity in its day, making an appearance not only in CN advertisements, but also at important events like the 1939 World's Fair in New York, and the 1939 Royal Tour. Its design was based on streamlining research conducted by the National Research Council in 1931, but wasn't built until 5 years later. In the exhibition Steam: A World in Motion, this locomotive represents steam as it was marketed to the public: modern, efficient, and stylish. On the right (being cleaned) is Canadian Pacific Railway locomotive 3100 (CP 3100), an experimental steam locomotive that was bigger and more powerful than any other locomotive on Canada's rails at the time that it was built, in 1928. While only two locomotives were built using this design, some of its elements -- such as the use of light, strong nickel-steel alloys, and an innovative one-piece frame -- were used in subsequent designs. In the exhibition Steam: A World in Motion, this locomotive represents the experimentation that was done to try to get the most out of a mature technology. In front of CN 6400, you'll see a model of the Empress of Britain II, the jewel of Canadian Pacific Steamships' fleet. The exhibition Steam: A World in Motion looks at not only steam-powered locomotives, but also steamships. Together, these technologies formed the backbone of the world economy between 1900-1960, touching the lives of all Canadians. (Photograph by Blair Gable)

Paul Bown, vice-president and volunteer with Bytown Railway Society, washes the exterior of a Canadian Pacific locomotive. (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Danny Matteau polishes a brass banister leading up to a Canadian Pacific locomotive at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Shown in this photograph is locomotive Canadian Pacific Railway 2858 (or CP 2858), built in 1938. In the exhibition Steam: A World in Motion, we use this exhibition to ground stories about working on the railway, since this particular type of locomotive was a favourite among workers--responsive, fast, and reliable. The locomotive was restored by the Bytown Railway Society in honour of Duncan du Fresne, who worked as a fireman on CP 2858, and was a founding member of the Society. The restoration project took 19 months. (Photograph by Blair Gable)

Danny Matteau polishes a brass banister leading up to a Canadian Pacific locomotive.  (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Morley Ouderkirk, interactive specialist and metal worker, assembles an "exploding" Smart car display in the From Earth to Us exhibit at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Photograph by Blair Gable This exhibition explores how we transform natural resources to meet our needs and wants, and in doing so, impact the world around us. Modules will cover topics including materials, steel, mining, fertilizer, energy, oil, climate change, and water. Highlights include exciting Canadian inventions, adventures in prospecting for gold, inspiring women miners, properties of materials, and the quest for energy. Immersive spaces feature a virtual mine showing current and future mining technologies and a prospector’s tent where you can learn about the life and work of a prospector, and a contemplative space where visitors can hear the voices of those experiencing climate change first-hand.

Morley Ouderkirk, interactive specialist and metal worker, assembles an “exploding” Smart car display in the From Earth to Us exhibit. (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Artifact exhibit installers Nigel Bowers and Dawn Carlisle assemble a display case in the From Earth to Us exhibit at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Photograph by Blair Gable This exhibition explores how we transform natural resources to meet our needs and wants, and in doing so, impact the world around us. Modules will cover topics including materials, steel, mining, fertilizer, energy, oil, climate change, and water. Highlights include exciting Canadian inventions, adventures in prospecting for gold, inspiring women miners, properties of materials, and the quest for energy. Immersive spaces feature a virtual mine showing current and future mining technologies and a prospector’s tent where you can learn about the life and work of a prospector, and a contemplative space where visitors can hear the voices of those experiencing climate change first-hand.

Artifact exhibit installers Nigel Bowers and Dawn Carlisle assemble a display case in the From Earth to Us exhibit. (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Museum tour guides get their first look at the the Hidden Worlds exhibit at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Photograph by Blair Gable Hidden Worlds focuses on how we reveal and explore hidden worlds — from the very small to deep in the ocean to far away in space. Hands-on experiences with microscopes and telescopes will allow visitors to see a broad range of technologies that provide us with information about these worlds.

Museum tour guides get their first look at the the Hidden Worlds exhibit. (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Museum tour guides get their first look at the Crazy Kitchen + exhibit at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Photograph by Blair Gable The Crazy Kitchen will be the principal experience within this exhibition. Surrounding the Crazy Kitchen will be several illusions which will challenge perceptions. Throughout this exhibition the science underlying the illusions, including the Crazy Kitchen, will be explored.

Museum tour guides get their first look at the Crazy Kitchen + exhibit. (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

A worker cleans the floors in the Into the Great Outdoors exhibit at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Photograph by Blair Gable

A worker cleans the floors in the Into the Great Outdoors exhibit. (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Annie Jacques, Exhibition Interpretation Officer, tests interactive exhibits in the Medical Sensations exhibit at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Photograph by Blair Gable Medical Sensations explores the world of medicine through the five senses, and how human and technological sensations shape medical culture. The exhibition showcases medical technologies, past and present, with examples from the Museum's rich medical collection as well as pieces sourced from medical collections across Canada. The central role human senses play in medical practice is examined. The exhibition engages visitors in highly-interactive and sensorial experiences, and prompts them to consider how technological advances have impacted their experience of medical care.

Annie Jacques, exhibition interpretation officer, tests interactive exhibits in the Medical Sensations area. (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Annie Jacques, Exhibition Interpretation Officer, tests interactive exhibits in the ZOOOM - Children's innovation zone at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Photograph by Blair Gable An 8,000 sq. ft. space for children two to eight years of age, this gallery is composed of nine circle-themed modules providing opportunities for play and experimentation. At its heart is the spirit of innovation that drives discovery. The gallery will feature elements of surprise and experimentation including a designated toddler area in close proximity to a family room, an interactive gear wall, a building station with over-sized foam blocks, a multi-sensorial play structure where children can run, a vehicle building station and test ramp, a light and sound console, and wind vortex with a large circular path and animated features.

Annie Jacques, exhibition interpretation officer, tests interactive exhibits in the ZOOOM. (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

The main entrance at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa October 25, 2017. Photograph by Blair Gable

The main entrance at the newly renovated Museum of Science and Technology.  (Photograph by Blair Gable)


 

Sign in to comment.