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A Reminder That Some Canadian TV Is Popular


 

One more link I think is worth looking at is Kate Taylor’s article in the Globe and Mail on the popularity of French-Canadian shows, and the lack of overlap (as yet) between the French-Canadian and English-Canadian TV business — there haven’t been many English-language remakes of Quebec shows, let alone successful ones.

The article discusses the question of whether the greater success of Quebec TV is mostly about the language barrier, or if there are things English-Canadian TV could learn from its French-language cousins. After all, people in Quebec have access to U.S. shows too, just as people around the world watch and love U.S. shows, both in English and dubbed. (The Mentalist and other U.S. shows are incredibly popular in France, for example.) But language does create a sort of buffer: if a viewer isn’t fluent in English, he or she has to wait for the dubbed version to come out, and that won’t usually be available at the exact same time as the U.S. broadcast — it’s not quite the same as a big movie, which will usually have the dubbed versions ready to go right away. The Mentalist premiered in fall of 2008, but the dubbed version didn’t come to Quebec until summer of 2009, and That creates a window of opportunity for shows in the viewer’s own language: he or she can get them absolutely new and fresh. It’s different for Anglophones; we can get the show in our usual language right away. We don’t have to look for Canadian product to get brand-new episodes in our own language.


 
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A Reminder That Some Canadian TV Is Popular

  1. I grew up with the Plouffe Family…loved the show, and got much of my worldview from it.

    We need more of this.

  2. I grew up with the Plouffe Family…loved the show, and got much of my worldview from it.

    We need more of this.

  3. Maybe we need some bilingual TV, Bon Cop, Bad Cop style.

  4. Maybe we need some bilingual TV, Bon Cop, Bad Cop style.

    • exactly! I have no idea why we aren't seeing this kind of production that could be jointly broadcast on CBC and SRC in franglais with subtitles throughout. It doesn't matter if Republic of Doyle is already doing the buddy cop thing, there are lots of other recipes: funny drama set in the Plateau of Montreal with a motley mix of young good looking bobos: anglophones, francophones and allophones, all living their funny dramatic lives in both languages with their different cultures blending and clashing.

      • I'd watch that but the Conservative M.P.s from Québec won't. They're always talking about how the Bloc is in cahoots with "leftists from the Plateau" instead of "real" Québecers.

      • I suspect comedy is hard to do in two languages especially if it has to appeal to language/culture groups that don't speak one of them.

  5. exactly! I have no idea why we aren't seeing this kind of production that could be jointly broadcast on CBC and SRC in franglais with subtitles throughout. It doesn't matter if Republic of Doyle is already doing the buddy cop thing, there are lots of other recipes: funny drama set in the Plateau of Montreal with a motley mix of young good looking bobos: anglophones, francophones and allophones, all living their funny dramatic lives in both languages with their different cultures blending and clashing.

  6. Some English language Canadian shows have been the best on TV. To me, This Is Wonderland" was brilliant.

  7. Some English language Canadian shows have been the best on TV. To me, This Is Wonderland" was brilliant.

  8. I'd watch that but the Conservative M.P.s from Québec won't. They're always talking about how the Bloc is in cahoots with "leftists from the Plateau" instead of "real" Québecers.

  9. Another reason that Québec made television has such a hold on the local populace is because television became a popular medium during much the same time as Québec was becoming self-aware during the 50s.

    Prior to that is had not been a largely literate or literary society due to the hold of the Catholic Church. (Obviously many exceptions exist.)

    This is not just some hare-brained theory I have concocted as M. Bilingual who has lived in Québec but something that I heard put forward quie often by Québecois media theorists and other intellectuals.

    One need only think of Les FIlles de Caleb to see the hold that a particular show can have on the entire province. Or how Tout le Monde en Parle is a passage obligé for any politican seeking to connect with the population.

  10. Another reason that Québec made television has such a hold on the local populace is because television became a popular medium during much the same time as Québec was becoming self-aware during the 50s.

    Prior to that is had not been a largely literate or literary society due to the hold of the Catholic Church. (Obviously many exceptions exist.)

    This is not just some hare-brained theory I have concocted as M. Bilingual who has lived in Québec but something that I heard put forward quie often by Québecois media theorists and other intellectuals.

    One need only think of Les FIlles de Caleb to see the hold that a particular show can have on the entire province. Or how Tout le Monde en Parle is a passage obligé for any politican seeking to connect with the population.

  11. I suspect comedy is hard to do in two languages especially if it has to appeal to language/culture groups that don't speak one of them.

  12. I'd love to see the French networks provide English closed captions along with French, and vice versa for the English networks. You'll occasionally see Spanish captions available on some of the English US networks, and vice versa.

  13. I'd love to see the French networks provide English closed captions along with French, and vice versa for the English networks. You'll occasionally see Spanish captions available on some of the English US networks, and vice versa.

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