Bestsellers - Macleans.ca
 

Bestsellers

Top-selling fiction and non-fiction titles (week of September 6th, 2010)


 

Top-selling fiction and non-fiction titles (week of September 6th, 2010)

Fiction

1 THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST
by Stieg Larsson
1 (16)
2 FREEDOM
by Jonathan Franzen
2 (2)
3 THE BEAUTY OF HUMANITY MOVEMENT
by Camilla Gibb
6 (3)
4 SANCTUARY LINE
by Jane Urquhart
(1)
5 THE HELP
by Kathryn Stockett
9 (28)
6 STAR ISLAND
by Carl Hiaasen
4 (4)
7 FAUNA
by Alissa York
10 (5)
8 ROOM
by Emma Donoghue
(1)
9 THE ELEPHANT’S JOURNEY
by José Saramago
(1)
10 THE THOUSAND AUTUMNS OF JACOB DE ZOET
by David Mitchell
5 (10)

Non-fiction

1
A JOURNEY
by Tony Blair
(1)
2 ILL FARES THE LAND
by Tony Judt
1 (4)
3 THE POWER
by Rhonda Byrne
(1)
4 HITCH-22
by Christopher Hitchens
6 (14)
5 PETER GZOWSKI
by R.B. Fleming
10 (2)
6 THE BERLIN-BAGHDAD EXPRESS
by Sean McMeekin
(1)
7 THE TIGER
by John Vaillant
3 (2)
8 WOMEN, FOOD AND GOD
by Geneen Roth
9 (2)
9 CARAVAGGIO
by Andrew Graham-Dixon
5 (4)
10 MEDIUM RAW
by Anthony Bourdain
7 (13)

LAST WEEK (WEEKS ON LIST)


 
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Bestsellers

  1. Can nothing stop the phenomenal dominance of the Hornet's Nest over our popular culture? Jonathan Franzen, you may be our last best hope…

    • Very popular trilogy. Even the Swedish movie is popular.

    • You have just incurred the wrath of Lisbeth. Your life will be short and not so sweet.

    • The first book, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, was really weak and loaded with clichés and comically stereotyped villains. I read it when it was published in the UK. It was as bad as any Michael Connelly, except it made fumbling attempts as seriousness about politics and violence against women, which made the crap mystery appear to be even more absurd. In the end, though, it was just tired. Most people I know who read it were not fans, either. But the author's dramatic death, the court battles over his estate, and the love of all things franchise seem to have warranted unprecedented marketing and PR efforts to support these books and films. Once one of these sensational juggernauts gets started, no amount of reason is involved in their popularity. Thanks, Dan Brown.

      • That;'s too bad – I was a great admirer of his brother Gary's work and was looking forward to more absurdist insect humour.

      • By mistake I picked up the second book first. I rarely read fiction and hadn't heard of the trilogy, but I saw the second book in a store, was intrigued by the plot and got into it before it dawned on me there was a previous book. However I liked it so much I went on reading and then had to get the third book to find how it all came out.

        Then I read the first book. I knew I'd find it less interesting because I'd already read the other two, but even so if I'd done it in the right order I probably wouldn't have bothered going past the first one…so it's a good thing I goofed. LOL

        Last fiction I'd read were two of Dan Browns some years ago. I preferred Angels and Demons to the Da Vinci code…which I thought had a flat ending. In spite of what the courts said it was a rip-off of a dull book written by 2 Frenchmen years before.

        However it did create a new genre, which we certainly needed, and it made people look at art and history in a new way….so it wasn't all bad.